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Full text of "A report to the Blyth-Zellerbach committee on modern management for San Francisco"

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GSVflSNMENT INFORMATION CENTER 
SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC LIBRARY 



SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC LIBRARY 



3 1223 90120 8240 

DOCUMENTS DEPARTMENT 



feS2.«T? 



A REPORT TO THE 
BLYTH-ZELLERBACH COMMITTEE 



ON 

MODERN MANAGEMENT 

FOR SAN FRANCISCO 



Recreation and 

\ 



Park Department 

JUNE 1961 VOLUME 3 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

California State Library Califa/LSTA Grant 



http://archive.org/details/reporttoblythzel02sanf 



fECSEATIDN MD PARK DEPAHTME3ST 



Report of the 
Task Force 

June 1961 



A PEPCRT 

WITE RECOMMENDATIONS 

CONCERNING THE ACTIVITIES 

OF TEE 

RECREATION AND PARK DEPARTMENT 

OF THE CITY AND COUNTY 

OF SAN FRANCISCO 



•i 
RECREATION AND PARK 
TASK FORCE OF TEE MAJOR'S 
COMMITTEE FOR MUNICIPAL MANAGEMENT 






63 08 ^e 






May 1961 

Marshall &« Mustain, 

Project Director 

Mayor's Committee for Municipal Management 

San Francisco, California: 

Dear Mr» Mustain: 

The Recreation and Park Task Force has completed a six-iaonth study of 
the organization, policies, manpower, tnd methods of ths Recreation and 
Park Department of the City and County of San Francisco ■> The attached 
report contains our findings and recommendations for larprovemei 

The following techniques of data gathering vere used in the course of 

the study; 

lo Interviews were held with management, key supex*visory, and 
ns many non-supervisory personnel as necessary to develop 
knowledge of the Recreation and Park Department organization 
and operation o 

2<> Keetirxgs of the Recreation and Park Commission held during the 
course of fS.eld work vere attended and minutes of the Commission 
for an eighteen -month period ^rere read and analyzed. 

3, Properties and facilities assigned to the Department were 
visited, inspected, and data gathered regarding physical 
facilities available, programs offered, and personnel assigned 
to the location. 

Ho Data were requested from other cities in San Francisco's 
population class „ 

5o Literature research included examination of budgets for 

recreation and park activities of other cities, annual reports 
of other recreation and park deper'&nents , master plans for 
recreation and park facilities published by other cities, and 
publications of the National Recreation Association and the 
California Recreation Commission o 

The analysis of these data and discussions of the Task Force are 
reflected in the attached report* 

We would like to take this opportunity to express our eppreciation 
the members of the Recreation and Park Commission, the management and 
staff personnel of the Recreation and Park Department, and members of 
other City and County departments for the excellent cooperation rect; 
in making available to us whatever sources of information were required 
and the time devoted to members of the Task Force durirg the course of 
the studyo 

Robert E. Hoffman 
rmai 



TABLE OF COHTEKTS 

Section Wbo F e ge 

Summary and Major Recommendations 6 

I General 9 

II Recreation and Park Commission 36 

III Recreation and Park Department lt-1 

IV Administration and Business Division U6 

V Recreation Division 50 

VI Park Division 63 

VII Engineering Division 70 

VIII Zoo Division 73 

IX Admissions and Fees 76 

X Savings and Additional Revenue 109 



•cliat 


Exhibit 


No. 


No- 


I 


I 




II 



INDEX OF E XEJOMfflS 

Title 

Recreation and Park Locations (Map) 

Per Cent of City Area in Recreation and Park. 
Facilities and acres per 100 population - 
Cities with 500,000 - 1,000,000 population 
and under 100 Square Miles in Area 

III Recreation Land Holdings in Acres 

IV Selected Recreation Facilities - 1958, 

V Schools Adjacent to Recreation - Park Units 

VI Recreation Facilities used by Various Schools 
during School Hours 

VII Schools Using Recreation Facilities after 
School Hours 

VIII City-ovned and Department-operated Automobiles - 
Assignment and Usage for i960 

IX Use of and Reimbursement for Privately-ovned 
Automobiles 

X Recreation and Park Department: Gross Expense 

Revenue, Bond Service Costs - Tears 1951-1961 

XI Recreation and Park Department: Gross Operating 

Expense - Revenue - Net Operating Expense - Bond 
Charges - Tax Funds Allocated, 1951-1961 Fiscal 
Years (Chart) 

XII Recreation and Park Department: Tax Rate - Per 
Capita Costs, 1951-1961 Fiscal Years (Chart) 

XIII 1959 Gross Expenditures for Recreation and Park 
(Excluding Capital Outlay) - Cities having 
population of 500,000 to 1,000,000 in 1950 Census 

XIV 1959 Net Expenditures for Recreation and Park 

Excluding Capital Outlay (Cities having population 
of 500,000 to 1,000,000 in 1950 Census) 

XV Per Capita 1959 Expenditures for Recreation and 
park (Chart) 

XVI Tabulation of Maturities of Recreation and Park 
Bond Issues 



.-^u.^rtTj.u« nau r>u\A 



Section Exhibit 



III 



IV 



VI 



IX 



XVII 

XVIII 

XIX 

XX 

XXI 

XXII 

XXIII 

XXIV 

XXV 
XXVI 



IHDEX OF EXHIBITS {Cont'd) 

Title 

Recreation and Park Department, Present 
Organization Chart 

Recreation and Park Department, Interim Proposed 
Organization Chart 

Administration and Business Division, Present 
Organization Chart 

Administration and Business Division, Proposed 
Organization Chart 

Recreation Division, Present Organization Chart 

Recreation Division, Proposed Organization Chart 

Park Division, Present Organization Chart 

Park Division, Proposed Organization Chart 

Golf Rates 

Zoo Admission Charges 






SWJKARI 

AND 

MAJOR RECOMMENDATIONS 



StiMMR¥ . ' , RECOMMENDATIONS 



The Recreation and Park Department is responsible for 'tin- 
ning for land and facilities necessary for park and recreational pur- 
poses, (2) acquisition of land and construction, reconstruction, 
operation and maintenance of facilities, (3) planning and supervising 
organized recreational activities on the Department's properties, and 
(l'y negotiation of and administration of agreements with lessees and 
concessionaires operating on the Department's properties., 

The total estimated expenditures for the Recreation and Park 
Department for the fiscal year 1960-61 ia $9,939,000, including requests 
for supplemental appropriations. Of this amoujot, $7>826,000 is for 
operating purposes and the balance of $2,163,000 is for major facilities 
repair projects and capital additions c 

The Department employs 836 full-time, 333 part-time, and kl exempt 
employees o It owns or controls properties at approximately 125 loca- 
tions, including Sharp Park Golf Course in San Mateo County and Camp 

' in Tuolomne County. 

Ma^or Recommendations 

1. Appraise use and need of present land and facilities, whether 
developed or undeveloped, and declare unnecessary parcels surplus for 
possible return to the tax rolls. Eight properties are covered in 
detailed recommendations. A complete and detailed review would un- 
doubtedly reveal others which might be considered unnecessary to current 
or anticipated needs of the Department. 

2c Discontinue the practice of purchasing land from General Fund 
appropriations after voters have defeated a bond issue for the same 
purpose . 

3. Establish a long-range planning program for new installations 
and facilities, including a review of the master plan approved in 1956, 
and distinguish between those essential and those merely desirable. 

Discontinue capital expenditures for facilities and equipment 
which will be used only by special hobby groups or which appeal to only 
small segments of the population. 

5. Establish a Joint committee with the School District to 
coordinate planning of proposed, and use of present, facilities of both 
organizations in order to avoid duplication and insure maximum use of 
recreation area6. 

6. Periodically review organized and supervised programs and 
eliminate high-cost, limited -attendance programs unless they can be made 
self-supporting. 






7» Reassign supervisory responsibilities to achieve better super- 
vision and coordination of effort and eliminate unnecessary positions., 

8» Reschedule present morning programs to afternoon hours thus 
reducing the number of hours of supervision necessary by 22, 9^5 hours 
annually. 

9. Establish work performance standards for all field classifi- 
cations and declere excess positions resulting therefrom cancelled as 
present personnel retire or leave the Department. Experience in the 
industrial field indicates this should result in a man-power savings 
of at least 15$. 

10. Establish a realistic schedule of fees for activities which 
should be self-supporting, or nearly so, and adopt as a policy that 
adult programs should generally be self-supporting. 

SavingB 

The recommendations contained in this report not requiring charter 
revision for adoption or implementation would have the following 
monetary effect: 

Annual savings from present operations $ 610,000 

Elimination of future operating costs 290,500 

One-time realization of value from sale of 

unnecessary property and prevention of 

capital improvement expenditures. 15? 353>003 

Annual ad valorem taxes from land returned 

to the tax rolls and new or additional fees 

and admissions. 2,178,000 



Grand Total $ 18, U3I, 500 



Charter Amendment Recommendations 

1. Amend Section k2 to eliminate exclusive supervision and 
direction of recreational activities after school hours by the San 
Prancisco Unified School District on facilities under its supervision . 






Amend Section 78 to eliminate the minimum, and establish a 
maximum amount, expressed as a number of cents in the tax rate, vhich 
may be devoted to Recreation and Park purposes. 

Separate detailed reports supporting these recommendations, as 
well as others, are attached „ 



Recreation and Park Task Force 

Robert E. Hoffman, Chairman 
J. F. Brandeburg 
S. G. Clark 
W. J. Rafaelli 
E. C. Tabler 



RECREATION AMD PARK 



I 

GENERAL 

Page No< 

Land Holdings, Acquisitions, and Capital Improvements 10 

Recreation and Park - School System co-operation in 21 

Recreation Programming 

Recreation Programs 28 

Automobile Use 31 

Limitation on amount of Funds Allocated to Recreation 3^ 
and Park Purposes 

Exhibits I - XVI 



LAMP B0LDHE3S, A CQUISITION, AND CAPITAL IMPROVEMENTS 

Findings 

Land owned or controlled by the Recreation and Park Department 
was as follows: 

Acres 



Inside (a) Outside 
City Limits City Limits Total 



19^7 (1) 3,210 (b) 655 (c) 3.. 865 

19^ (2) 3,326 (b) 655 (c) 3,981 

19^0 (3) 3,^26 (b) 655 (c) M8l 



(a) Exhibit I shows locations of properties as of June 30, I96O0 
Does not include estimated 52,372 acres of San Francisco 
Bay and Pacific "Ocean areas within the city limits, some 

of which is used for recreation purposes and all of which 
provides open space. 

(b) Includes 368 acres of Lake Merced water area. Does not 
include school playground areas used from time to time by 
Recreation and Park Department on a part-time basis, nor the 
k2 schoolyards presently staffed with School District person- 
nel on a six-day, 22-hour schedule when school is in session 
and six-day, Uo-hour schedule when school is not in session, 
nor 18 gymnasiums with School District coverage 15 hours 

(5 evenings) per week. " 

(c) Includes: Sharp Park Golf Course, San Mateo County ^55 acres 

Camp Mather, Tuolumne County 200 acres, 



Land controlled by the Recreation and Park Department on June 30, 
i960, represented 5»35 square miles or 11.5$ of the availaV :rea 
on the mainland of the City and County of San Francisco. This land 
provides ,k6 acres of recreation and park property per 100 population 
(i960 census) . Guides used nationally for determining minimum adequacy 
of recreation and parks are: (a) 10$ of available land area, or 
(b) 1 acre per 100 population. Master plans for recreation and park 
facilities in several cities were replete with the caution that there were 
no universally accepted standards for such facilities. The factors of 
geographic location of the city, density of population, nature of popu- 
lation, availability and cost of land, and availability of recreation and 
park facilities in the surrounding territory were among those to be 
considered in determining present and future adequacy of facilities * 



10 



Of eleven cities vith from 500,000 to 1,000,000 population in 
San Francisco ranks third in the percent of city area devoted 
to recreation and park facilities (Exhibit XI} and exceeds the average 
of 9o97# of the other ten cities » San Francisco's dense population 
places it below the weighted average of 0633 acres per 100 population 
of the other ten cities. 

(l), (2), (3) — Numbered references are listed on sheet headed 
"References" at the end of narrative,, 



Other factors vhich must also be considered, and which are ignored 
in the above comparisons, are the availability of recreation and park 
facilities owned or operated by other governmental units in the 
vicinity of an urban city and also the availability of privately owned 
and operated facilities. Exhibits III and IV show total recreation 
and park area and facilities available to residents of San Francisco in 
10 counties within relatively short driving distances from the city. 

Capital investment (4) in Recreation and Park Department facilities 
exclusive of Candlestick Perk, was as follows: 

Buildings 
Structures 
Total Land Improvements Equipment 



Playgrounds 
Parks and Squares 
Golf Links 

P ' .idium 



$16,344,907 

32,139,991 

2,107,993 

1, 328,246 



$ 3,721,768 

21, 383, l4o 

745,205 

222, 823 



$11,85^,1*06$ 768,73** 
10,787,680 96U,170 
1,362,788 

1,105,1*15 



$5l,92l ; 137 $26,077,944 $25,110,289 $1,732,90^ 



Additions to properties (4) in Recreation and Park Department 
facilities, exclusive of Candlestick Park, for the ten-year period July 1, 
1950 to June 30, i960 were as follows: 

Buildings 
Structures 
m 3 ' -\1 Land .improvem ents Equipmer t 



Playgrounds 
Parks and Squares 
Golf Links 
Kezar Stadium 


$10,307,619 

4, 815, 413 

1,177,407 

286,943 


$ 


709,947 

421,039 

745,205 

167 


$ 9,076,227 

3,965,724 

423, 202 

286 , 776 


$ 


521, 

428,650 


Total 


$16,587,382 


$ 


1,876,358 


$13,760,929 


$ 


950,095 


Average Cost of 
Additions Per Yr. 


$ 1,659,000 


$ 


168,000 


$ 1,371,000 


$ 


95 



11 



RK 



Source of funds (k) for these additions to properties vere: 

19^7 and 1955 Recreation Bonds $12,579,271 75 M 

Current Funds 3,297,565 19o9# 

State Funds 575,000 3»5^ 

Gift 116,750 0% 

Undetermined 1§, 796 .10 



Total $16,587,382 100 .0* 



The additions to properties for the period July 1, 1950 to June 30, i960 
represents approximately 32$ of total investment in properties as of 
June 30, i960. Thus nearly one -third of the capital investment in pro- 
perties and facilities was made in the last decade — a decade in which 
San Francisco's population decreased 35,000 or k.yja. 

"Repo rt on a Pl an for the Locat ion of Parks and Recreation Areas in 
San Francisco " 

This report, prepared by the San Francisco Department of City 
Planning, published in April, 195^, recommended the addition of approxi- 
mately 550 acres of land to be added to the major city-wide park system 
and approximately 200 acres of land to be added to the recreation and 
park system in the community areas of the city. The report defines 
twelve community areas for purposes of planning <> The total of 750 acres 
recommended would have increased land owned or controlled by the 
Recreation and Park Department within the city limits by approximately 
22.5$ (from 3,326 acres to l+,076 acres) « Including Sharp Park Golf 
Course in San Mateo County (^55 acres) and Camp Mather in V 
County ((200 acres), the total land owned or controlled by the Recreation 
and Park Department and devoted to recreation and park purposes would be 
U,731 acres o 

The U,076 acres recommended within the city limits would equal 
approximately 6 .,35 square miles or 13 „7$ of the city's land area.. 
Based on the i960 population this would be approximately .,55 acres per 
100 population,. 

On Page 26 of the report the following statement is made, 
"San Francisco is comparatively rich in large park lands, but is 
deficient in the number and distribution of its playgrounds and play- 
fields, and small parks." However, the land proposed to be added for 
park purposes, in the main, were on the perimeter of the city or in 
the proposed interior green belt surrounding Twin P^ais and not in the 
type of facility in which the city is deficient. The proposed a 
tions for community areas for parks, playlots* playgrounds , and pla; 
fields would have increased the proportion in such conEronity areas 
from 25„6$ to 25.8$ of total Recreation and Park Department contrc' 
lands. 



12 



■-TIOT AND PARK 



In addition, on pages 13-15 of the report there is a diBcussion 
of the recreation programs and use of facilities of the School 
District and the Recreation and Park Department, The discussion 
ended as follows: 

"Instead of following the concept of school -playground neighbor- 
hood centers, which is gaining acceptance throughout the nation 
for reasons of economy and efficiency, the present charter pro- 
vision (Section *v2, fourth paragraph, amended I9U9) is fostering 
a concept of division. It is here contended that this is undesir- 
able from the standpoint of general planning principles, as well 
as the principle specifically 6tated as follows in the Land Use 
Section of the Master Plan: 'Within each residential community 
area the public and semi -public facilities, such as high school, 
Junior high school, and playfields, should be grouped wherever 
possible into conmiunity centers easily accessible to all residents 
of the area. ' 

"In any plan for recreation areas consideration of school properties 
must be included „ It is 1 not within the scope of this report, how- 
ever, to present a solution for the jurisdictional difficulties of 
the present dual authority „ Nevertheless, it is recommended that 
the situation be re-examined and that provision be made at least 
to formalize and strengthen the coordination which now exists on 
a voluntary basis between the two public agencies providing recrea- 
tional services in San Francisco o" 

NOTE: Parenthetical reference to Charter Section k2 added. 

There is no evidence that the caution of the City Planning De^ . Lment was 
heeded nor that their recommendation was acted upon. In fact, while the 
School District U6es 1*5 locations on Recreation and Park properties, 
they also have U2 schoolyards with School District personnel supervision 
six days per week for 22 hours while school is in session and six days 
per week for kO hours while school is not in session and 18 gymnasiums 
with School District personnel supervision five evenings per week for 
15 hours o 

Capital Improvement Program 

The "Capital Improvement Program, 196O-I96I through I965-I966" 
transmitted to Mayor Christopher on January 11, 196o> lists 126 projects 
for the Recreation and Park Department which are proposed for after 
June 30, I96O0 The total estimated amount for these projects was 
$11,71+7,800 or an average of approximately $1,958,000 per year for the 
six-year period. The projected source of funds was as follows: 

Annual Budget $ U, 0^2,100 

19U7 and 1955 Recreation Bonds 2,8Vv,kOO 

Proposed New Bond Issues 2,970,000 

Prior Years' Budgets 11,300 

Other Sources 1,880,000 



13 






Major proposed projects are: 

Ferry Park Land and Development $ 2,970,000 
Mc Laren Park Development 2,230,000 
Marina Small Boat Harbor 1,825,000 
Diamond Heights (2 playgrounds) 600,000 
Hamilton Playground Development 350,000 
Harding Park Golf Course, Automatic Irriga- 
tion System 300,000 
Alta Plaza Play Area Redevelopment 300,000 
Golden Gate Park - New Playground 202, 500 
Hew Playground at Melrose, Mangels & Terecita 200,000 
San Francisco Zoological Gardens: (a) 

New Service lard and Building 185,000 

New Aviary for non-aquatic bir4s 180,000 

Relocate Service Area 115,000 

New Playground in Presidio, Marina District 175,000 

Helen Wills Playground Rehabilitation 105,000 

Holly Park Development Activities Area .. 100,000 
Sigmund Stern Grove Golf Driving Range & 

Picnic Area 100,000 
Total Major Projects $ 9,937,500 



(a) Total long-range capital investment program for San Francisco 
Zoological Gardens total $3,900,000, 

These sixteen major projects represent approximately 85$ of the 
six-year total proposed capital improvement program for the Recreation 
and Park Department,, The Capital Improvement Program does not list such 
projects as the rehabilitation of the Palace of Fine Arts or the possi- 
ble purchase of Fort Funston lands. 



In summary, historical capital cost per acre is $15,613, which 
includes $8,687 for land (based upon additions for the last 10 years) 
and $6,926 for structures and improvements . 

Annual costs per acre total $5,58^ which includes $1,100 for main- 
tenance of land and structures and $U, kQh loss of property tax income « 
For the city's 3,1*26 acres, this amounts to more than 16^ million 
dollars annually. 



1U 



Specific Recommendations 



.. 5 ;• 



lo Review immediately land end facilities "owned" or controlled 
by the Recreation and Park Department which are undeveloped or inopera- 
tive for possible classification as surplus property. This review 
should include consideration of the following factors: 

a. Purpose for which land is held and the objectives for 

which it was or might be developed, 
bo Capital invested in land or improvements. 

c. Current annual operating and maintenance costs, if any. 

d. Estimated capital costs for proposed development to meet 
purposes and objectives of the facility. 

e. Estimated sale price if property were to be declared 
surplus and sold. 

f o Estimated annual operating and maintenance cost if facility 

were developed in accordance with plans, 
g. Estimated ad valorem tax Income if property were sold and 

developed and added to the tax rolls, 
h. Examples s 

(1) McLaren Park: Under acquisition since 1928. Total 
area is 326 acres with land value of $U, 672, 000 
and improvements valued at $25,000 according to the 
June 30, i960 property list. These figures do not 
reflect $*K)6,U00 invested in the swimming pool 
completed October, I958 nor $580,000 invested in a 
nine -hole golf course to be completed in 196I0 The 
presently undeveloped area in McLaren Park comprises 
255 acres and represents approximately $3,600,000 in 
land value. As indicated in the previous ion 
on the "Capital Improvement Program", it is planned 
to spend $2,230,000 for development of McLaren Park 
and it is estimated that annual buildings and 
grounds maintenance costs will be $280,500. Based on 
average property tax income per acre, the undeveloped 
portion of McLaren Park represents a minimum annual 
loss of $1,1^3,1*20 for ad valorem taxes. 

(2) Bay View Park: Acquired 1915. Land area is approxi- 
mately 26 acres with a land valuation of $130,000. 
This land, composed of red rock, would be difficult, 
and expensive, to develop and maintain. No plans to 
develop this park are included in the Capital 
Improvement Program. 

(3) Sunset Heights Park: Acquired 192U. Land area is 
approximately 5 acres and has a valuation of $125,000. 
The eastern side of the park is flat and has a lawn 
area, play apparatus, and tennis courts. The balance - 
is hilly with an imposing view of the Pacific Ocean. 



15 



RECREATION AM) PARK 



(h) DuPont and Richmond Tennis Courts: This land is 

owned by the School District and each parcel is .83 
acres and the total valuation for the tvo is $288, 000c 

(5) Other undeveloped areas include Lake Merced lands 

(157 acres), Mt. Davidson Park (39 acres), Twin Peaks 
Park and Interior Green Belt (28 acres), Orandview 
Park (l acre) and other miscellaneous properties 
totaling .9 acre. 

It is recognized that some natural areas in the city's park system may 
he desirable but provision for these must be balanced with total 
recreation and park facility needs and other requirements of the city, 
including minimizing land exempt for property taxes unless a real public 
need is demonstrated. 

2. Review immediately and revise the "Report on a Plan for the 
Location of Parks and Recreation Areas in San Francisco" giving due 
consideration to: 

a « I -ease iu t»"olatioa in Sac Fraiiois^** between 1930 and I960 

and the shift in location of the population during this t 

period, 
b. Recreation and park facilities within and near San Francisco 

owned by other governmental agencies. 
Co Plana for recreation and park facilities in and near 

San Francisco prepared by other governmental agencies. 

d. Imbalance between neighborhood and community playground and 
play field acreage vs. large park acreage. 

e. Realistic evaluation of population served at existing 
locations. 

f . Recreation facilities planned by the School District on 
projects proposed or under construction. 

g. Recreation and park facilities in or near San Francisco which 
are privately owned and extensively used by San Francisco 
residents . 

Examples: Russian River area, Valley of the Moon,. Blackberry 
Farm near Cupertino, etc. 
h. Examples: 

(1) The California State Park Department in a recent annual 
report outlined plans to add portions of the Presidio. 
Fort Baker, Fort Barry, and Fort Ci'onkhite to the 
State Park System. These lands were to be acquired as 
they are declared surplus by the Federal Government. 

(2) 195^ Plan Project 8.t: Proposed play lot on Carolina 
Street between 23rd and 25th Streets. This location is 
across the street from the Starr King Elementary School 
and there is some play apparatus already at this 
location. 



16 



m PARK 

ja Project 8o5: .Bernal Heights Park and Play- 
ground, completely encircled by Bernal Heights Boule- 
vard . This land is "owned" by the Department of Public 
Works and is approximately 20 acres « The June 30, i960, 
valuation on the land was $100, 000 <> The area involved 
is a red rock hill and leaves much to be desired as 
far as accessibility is concerned,. Since it is on a 
hill, there is a question whether a playground at this 
location would be adequately patronized. In addition, 
development costs would be higher than normal 

(U) I95U Plan Project 87: South Bernal Playground, 

Tompkins Avenue and Folsom Street . This location is 
a short distance from existing Bernal Playground and 
is related to Paul Revere School, which currently has 
a School District supervised program., 

(5) 195^ Plan Project 9,1: Hunters Point Park-Playground, 
south of Northridge Road, adjacent to the Ridgepoint 
School then under construction.. At the present time, 
the Housing Authority has constructed a recreation 
center at 1 Kiska Road and there is a School District 
supervised program at Jedediah Smith Elementary School » 

(6) Playground on McLaren Park (added to 195^ Plan when 
approved in 1956) : This proposed playground location 
seems to be on top of a hill, which detracts from 
patronage o Suggest using playground at Eldorado Home 
School o 

(7) Playground in vicinity of Silver Avenue, Cambridge 
Street, and ¥ale Street (added to 195^ Plan when approved 
in 1956): This location is near HillcreBt Elementary 
School which has a School District supervised program, 
both in the schoolyard, and at night in the gymnasium, 

(8) I95U Plan Project 10 „2: Avalon Playground* 
proposed playground is in the vicinity of Monroe 
Elementary School at Madrid Street and Excelsior Avenue « 

(9) 195U plan Project 11«>5: San Miguel Park and Flaylot, 
interior of block bounded by Bruce Avenue, Edgar Place, 
Niagara Avenue, Howth Street and Geneva Avenue » This 
property is owned by the Seventh Day Adventist Church 
and is being developed for their own purpose 8. 

(10) I95U Plan Project 11»6: Merced Playground, South Side 
of Eucalyptus Drive between 25th Avenue and Inverness „ 
This location is site of the new Lowell High School, 
presently under construction,. 

NOTEs Th e Recreation and Park Task Force of the Mayor's Committee 
for Municipal Management made no attempt to visit each 
proposed facility listed in the 195^ Plan, The above 
examples are illustrative only, 

17 






3. Iteclare as surplus the recreation and park properties whJ 
have bbec developed hut which have little patronage, are diffi< 
maintain, and are near other facilities. 

Examples: 

a. James Rolph, Jr. Playground: Disposition recommended in 
195*4- Plan since its location at intersection of Army c 
Potrero Avenue and Bayshore Freeway cuts it off from r 
dential areas it might serve. The land valuation on 
June 30, i960 was $305,000. 

b. Bay View Playground: Disposition recommended in 195*4 
since its service area had developed into industrial area. 
The land valuation on June 30, i960 was $250,000. 

C Alta Plaza: Area on Clay Street between Steiner and Scott 
Streets to a depth of 120* to 150'. This area is stee 
terraced, is difficult to maintain, and is little us 
Even vith this 2.k acres removed from the Alta Plaza there 
would remain approximately 9-5 acres for recreation and 
park purposes,, The land valuation as of June 30, 196^ 
the 2.4 acres is estimated at $620,000. 

d. Lafayette Park: Area on Gough Street between Sa- 

Washington Streets to a depth of 130' except for exist 
private property. This represents 1.3k acres of the exir 
II.56 acres in Lafayette Park. The eastern slopes of 
lafayette Park are steep and grassed or planted in trees 
and shurbs requiring little attention. The land valua 
represented by the portion under discussion as of June 30, 
i960 was approximately $406,000. 

NOTE Again, no attempt was made to review all existing prope 

but the examples listed are Illustrative of the principle 
involved. 

k. discontinue the practice of purchasing land for recreation and 
park purposes from general fund appropriations after proposed bond 
for such purposes have not been approved by the voters t . Example: 
McLaren PSirkc 






a. McLaren Park: On November 6, 1928 a $2,000,000 bond p 
sal to purchase and develop 550 acres of land and to e 
this proposed park* This bond proposal was defeated. The 
city began buying the land from general funds. Over the 
years the area has been reduced to 326 acres and the final 
land acquisition was accomplished the latter part of i960* 
Thus, land acquisition has taken 32 years. land acquisi- 
tion costs to date have been $1,532,320. Capital improve- 
ment costs to date have been $986,000 (for a swimming pool 
and a nine-hole golf course). A plan proposed in 1959 by 
contract engineers and landscape architects proposed a 
$6,500,000 development of McLaren Park, not including the 
golf course presently under construction. $2,230,000 is 
included in the capital improvement program for expendi- 
ture through June 30, 1966. Total cost of McLaren Park 
acquisition and development is currently estimated to be 
in excess of $9*000, 000. 

5. Discontinue capital expenditures for facilities and equipment 
which will be used only by special hobby groups or appeal to small 
segments of the population. Examples: Photography Center and some 
facilities at the Junior Museum. 

6. Establish a committee to coordinate the planning of proposed 
Recreation and Park Department playgrounds and playf ields with proposed 
School District playgrounds and playf ields, or changes in such facilities 
so that duplication of facilities, and resulting high capital costs, 

may be avoided. The recommended membership of this committee is: 

a. One representative of the Chief Administrative Officer's 
office or Department of Public Works. 

b. One representative from City Planning Department* 

c. One representative from budget unit in the Mayor's office 
(or Budget Department when established). 

d. One representative from Recreation and Park Department. 

e. One representative from the Board of Education or School 
District. 



19 



RECREATION AND PARK 



References 

"Report on a Study of the Proposed Consolidation of the Park and 
Recreation Departments" - Office of the Mayor, City and County 
of San Francisco - August 19U7» 



2. "Report on a Plan for the Location of Parks and Recreation Areas 
in San Francisco" - San Francisco Department of City Planning - 
April 195U. 



"Valuation of Real Properly Owned by City and County of 
San Francisco" - Director of Property - July 1, I96O0 



"Annual Report of the Controller of the City and County of 
San Francisco for the Fiscal Year Ended June 30, 196o„" 



20 



REACTOR AND PARK 

RSCREATXON AM) PARK - SCHOOL SY STEM COOPERATION IS RECREATION PROSRAMMINB 

General 

This discussion is based on the premise that the Recreation and 
Park Department should provide and supervise the organized recreational 
activities of the community and the Unified School District should be 
charged with providing the educational facilities and programs for the 
community,, For the hast utilization of the tax dollar, cooperation 
between those responsible for the recreation system and those responsible 
for the school system is essential. Existing state laws provide the 
means whereby any community can cooperate with another legal jurisdic- 
tion to finance, construct, maintain and program facilities and 
activities*, San Francisco, under the present dual authority over recrea- 
tion programs, is not taking advantage of these provision The division 
of responsibility for recreation programs within tha area of the City 
and County of San Frencisco encourages duplication of recreation facili- 
ties and programs. Building and maintaining separate facilities and 
providing separate personnel when, for the most part, use i6 heaviest 
at different times of the day, is a waste of the taxpayer's money . 

"Repo rt on a Pl an for the Location of Parks and Rec reati on Areas " 

The jurisdictional difficulties of the dual responsibility for 
recreational activities in San Francisco was recognized in the "Report 
on a Plan for the Location of Parks and Recreation Areas" prepared in 
April 1954 by the Department of City Planning. The report reviewed the 
consolidation of the Recreation Department and the Park Department, which 
was stimulated by duplication of service and a nationwide trend toward 
simplifying governmental structure and administration. Efficiency of 
operation and economy of effort were principal arguments in favor of 
the merger, which was consummated on July 1, 1950 « 

The report continued by emphasizing the following: 

"Although the consolidation was promoted to achieve an economy in 
effort and to eliminate the duplication of services, the Charter amend- 
ment (see Section k2) established a new form of duplication and over- 
lapping between the new department and the School District. The 
amendment states that it shall be the policy of the Recreation and Park 
Commission to promote and foster a program providing for organized 
public recreation of the highest standard. But it also provides that 
the San Francisco Unified School District shall supervise and direct 
recreational activities in facilities under its Jurisdiction, a 
function previously carried out by the Recreation Department by agree- 
ment with the School District. 

"During the 1952-53 fiscal year, the third year of the new School 
District recreation program, it operated on an all-year basis on 36 
schoolyard sites as playgrounds and at 16 gymnasiums as night recrea- 
tion centers. The activity programs on the schoolyards are planned 
for all school-age groups, but particular emphasis is placed upon the 
activities for children within the age range of the school at which the 
program is being conducted. The evening gymnasiums provide recreational 
activities for adults as well as boys and girls „ 

21 






ause of the increase in the number of schoolyard teams in 
city -wide athletic leagues and play days, the School District has 
discontinued participation in the Recreation and Park Department sports 
program and has formed the Schoolyard Athletic League Chess, bad- 
minton, the handicrafts have been added to the activities program. 
During the summer vacation last year (1953) approximately 6,500 children 
vere taken on weekly outings and 335 children, under School District 
supervision, spent a week at the Silver Tree Day Camp operated by the 
Recreation and Park Department in Glen Canyon. 

"The Charter mandate that the San Francisco Unified School District 
supervise and direct recreational activities in facilities under its 
jurisdiction has in part nullified the primary purpose of the consolida- 
tion amendment, which was to create a single department in the city 
charged with the responsibility for public recreation.. However, this 
clause and the Charter provision that the newly created Commission and 
the School District shall have the power to supervise and direct other 
adjacent recreational and park facilities either Jointly or severally 
by agreement, reflects the traditionally close alliance between the public 
recreation function and public education. Just as park and recreation 
properties became similar in visible aspect, so from the beginning of 
the public recreation movement there developed a less and less sharp 
distinction between the educational aspects of the Recreation Department 
and the recreational activities of the School District. 

"Because of the similarity of purpose there was close cooperation 
between the Recreation Department and the School District before the 
1950 charter changes. The usefulness and economy of placing recreation 
grounds next to schools, so well demonstrated at Aptos Playground and 
Junior High School, where the school use the ball fields during school 
hours, and the Recreation Department conducted programs in the school 
gymnasium after school hours and in the evenings, guided the choice of 
particular sites in the recreation bond issue development program. 
Many of the new post-war schools have been built with gymnasiums or 
all-purpose rooms to supplement the recreation facilities in nearby 
playgrounds, llloa School and South Sunset Playground, the new Bret H 
School and Gilman Pl&yground, and the schools and recreatio ties 
of the Sunset Community Center are examples of this juxtaposition. In 
neighborhoods where no playgrounds exist and none have been planned, the 
new l$kQ bond issue schools such as Anza and Hillcrest are equipped with 
indoor and outdoor play space to supply the neighborhood need. Although 
the Recreation and Park Department of the City and the Recreation 
Division of the School District work closely together to insure a proper 
spread of service throughout the city, the present Charter provision 
forces a situation where two similar recreation programs, planned and 
supervised by different authorities, operate side by side. 



22 



. AMD PARK 



"The importance of this newly created duality of function and 
puriNjse to ths plan for parks and rec •< ; .ion areas is this: the 19^5 
Playgrounds Plan of the Master Plan and the 19*+ 7 Reci-catiCi* 2~:".r 
Issue program were "ba sed^ on the p rincip le th at^recr eatlon ^ areaT " 
should be located ad jacent to schools so ohau infaxiiama us-s of the 
facilities of each department could be obt giiicfl by joint use, at an 
OveraU 'savlng to the taxpayer . Thus, the School District c 3 
ttecreation Department grounds during the school hours, and the 
Recreation Department could conduc ty-wide act ivi ty programs 

in school gymnasiums and all-purpose rooms after school hours . 

"It was formerly considered desirable by both departments to plan 
school and recreation facilities in conjunction with each other; the 
present division of authority encourages a separation of facilities so 
that each department can conduct a full neighborhood recreation 
program under its own policy = 

"Instead of following the concept of school -playground neighborhood 
centers, which is gaining acceptance throughout the nation for reasons 
of economy and efficiency, the present charter provision is fostering a 
concept of division. It is here contended that this i6 undesirable 
from the standpoint of general planning principles, as well as the 
principle specifically 3tated as follows in the Land Use Section of 
the Master Plan: 'Within each residential community area the public 
and semi -public facilities, such as high school, junior high school, 
and playfield, should be grouped wherever possible into community 
centers easily accessible to all residents of the area,' 

"In any plan for recreation areas consideration of school properties 
must be included. It is not within the scope of this report, however, 
to present a solution for the jurisdictional difficulties of t 
present dual authority. Nevertheless, it is recommended that the situa- 
tion be re-examined and that provision be made at least to formalize 
and strengthen the coordination which now exists on a voluntary bf\ 
between the two public agencies providing recreational services in 
San Francisco." 

The Curr ent Situation 

The present status of the services rendered by the Recreation 
Division of the Recreation and Park Department and the San Francisco 
Unified School District is as follows: 

Recreation and Park Department: 

I. Supervises and provides programs and personnel coverage 
either full-time or part-time for some 30 recreation units 
with 12 gymnasiums plus the Junior Museum, Recreation Arts 
Building, Aquatic Park, Lake Merced (La^e and Fports Center), 
four golf courses, Storyland, Golden Gate Tennis Courts, 
rifle range, and Summer Day Camps (Silvar Tree and Fine I 
nine swimming pools and phelan Beach for a total of ] 
tions. These locations include playgrounds, playfiel' 
playlots and housing centers. 

23 



2 C The administrative staff consist;; 

Superintendent of Recreation* fc.ro Supervison 
Athletics, five Supervising Directors, and three 
Recreation Directors. 

3o The recreational units are supervised and serviced 

1 Supervisor of Aquatics 

1 Supervisor of Music 

1 Curator of the Junior Museum 

1 Supervisor of Drama and Dance 

7 Supervising Directors 
lUo Full-time employees 
229 Rart-time employees 
Ul Exempt employees (not to exceed $12Uo99 per mo 

School System Recreation Divisions 

lc Supervises and provides programs and personnel coverage 
on a pnrt°>tlm@ basis at %2 schoolyard playgrouads and 18 
gymnasiums (five Elementary Schools,, nine Junior High. 
and four Senior High Schools) at night „ See Exhibit I 
for location of these units and their relationship to 
Recreation and &rk Department locations. 

2. The administrative staff consists of a Coordinator of 
Health, fhysical Education , Athletics and Recreation 
(l/3 assigned to Recreation), and two Supervising 
Directors « 

3. The schoolyard playgrounds and night gymnasium programs 
are serviced by: 

Uh Schoolyard Directors with schedules of : 
3*00 p. mo to 6:00 p.m. Monday through Friday, 
lOiOO a.m. to 5*00 p«m. Saturdays and school 
holidays, ^J-O-haur (6 day) week during Easter* 
Christmas, and summer vacations * 

kO Exempt Civil Service Recreation Directors; 
38 are evening gymnasium directors scheduled 
7:00 p m to lOsOO p.iac Monday through Friday. 
Two (2) Directors are assigned to each gym and 
alternate two nights one week and three nights 
the following week,, as under the limitations of 
Civil Service "Exempt" regulations a Director 
cannot work the full week night schedule . 

8 Locker Aides scheduled 7s 00 to 10:00 p.m, Monday 
through Friday through the year. 

ho Authorized expenditures of this activity were as foil 
Fiscal liear Ended 
June 30, 1959 1303*538 
June 30, I960 207, Vfl 



Zk 



RECREATION AND PARK 



There are 18 schools immediately adjacent to or across the street 
from recreation units (Exhibit V). Nine of these have gymnasiums. 
!The school system provides evening programs in five. 

Thirty-three recreation units or facilities and eight swimming 
pools are used by schools during school hours for gymnasium classes , 
R.OoT.C training, play and lunch periods (Exhibit VI). 

Thirty- three recreation facilities, plus swim pools are used by 
schools for "after school sport activities" (Exhibit VII) and for 
Academic Athletic Association competition. 

Although there has been cooperation between the two organizations, 
only two school gymnasiums have been used recently by the Industrial 
Division of Recreation and Park Department. They are used for adult 
men's basketball league and women's volleyball league competition. 
However, the school system recreation department supervisee the 
gymnasiums during these programs. 

The cooperation aad coordinated u.=>c o± facilities appears to be ? 
sided. The Recreation Division of Recreation and ]?ark Department provides 
the school system with unlimited use of their facilities; the school 
system's facilities are generally available for only the school's 
recreation programs » This does not allow the Recreation and Park Depart- 
ment to conduct community-wide activities and programs in school gymna- 
siums and all-purpose rooms after school hours » It defeats the princi- 
ple that maximum use of the recreation areas and facilities of each 
department could be obtained by Joint use, at an overall saving to the 
taxpayer „ 

Following is a list of cities where contract agreements have been 
arranged between Recreation and/or Park Departments and the School 
Districts authorizing use of certain defined school areas, buildings 
or facilities by the City Recreation Department: 

New York West Covina Fremont 

Chicago Santa Rosa Newark 

San Diego Glendale Antioch 

Beverley Hills Daly City Skiah 



Specific Recommendations 



lo Develop a plan for the cooperative use of facilities ovned by 
San Francisco Unified School District and the Recreation and Park 
Department.. The Recreation and Park Department should supervise 
"organized recreation" after school hours with cooperation from the school 
district. Formalize this plan in the form of an agreement between the 
San Francisco Unified School District and the City and County of 
San Francisco. 



25 



This agreement should provide for: 

a„ Specifying the location for and nature of cooperative programs, 

ho Selection of personnel to supervise such cooperative programs * 

Co Equipping and maintaining facilities cooperatively used. 

2o Estahlish a committee to coordinate the planning of proposed 
Recreation and Park Department facilities vith proposed School District 
facilities, or changes in such facilities, so that duplication, with 
resulting higher capital costs, may be avoided* The term "facilities" 
includes playgrounds, playfields, playlots, gymnasiums, auditoriums, 
recreation center buildings, multi-purpose rooms, swimming pools, etc 
The recommended membership of this committee is: 

a. One representative from the Chief Administrative Officer's 
office or the Department of Public Works. 

bo One representative from the City Planning Department* 

Co One representative from the budget unit in the Mayor's 
Office (or Budget Department, when established). 

do One representative from the Recreation and Park Department 

e. One representative from the Board of Education or the 
School District o 

Note: This same recommendation is included under the subject 
of "Land Holdings, Acquisition and Capital 
Improvements » n 

3o Undertake an immediate and thorough study to determine possible 
utilization of School District facilities and programs which might ful- 
fill proposals contained in approved master plan for recreation and park 
locations. 

Uo Consider the appointment of a representative of the Board of 
Education or School District to the next vacancy on the Recreation and 
Park Commission. Many communities in the state have found this advanta- 
geous for developing understanding, coordination and cooperation between 
two governmental units with overlapping responsibilities. 



26 



RECREATIOfl AND PARK 

Charter ftaendment 

5. Amend Section ^-2 of the Charter to eliminate exclusive super- 
vision and direction of recreational activities after school hours 
by the San Francisco Unified School District in facilities under its 
supervision. As the School District is not accountable directly to 
the top management of the City and County (Mayor or Board of Super- 
visors), it should not control recreational activities. 

The school district's responsibility is basically educational 
in nature. Recreation logically concerns the youngsters' free time 
after school hours are completed and adults during their free time, 
vhich generally occurs during evenings, veek-ends, or days off from 
work. 



27 



RECREATION AND PARK 



RECREATlOff PROGRAMS 

The Recreation and Park Department operates a great variety of 
activities, both outdoor and indoor. There is apparently no attempt 
made to differentiate between programs which are purely recreational 
and those of a quasi -educational nature » Also, programs are instituted 
without regard to the degree of acceptance by the populationo 

The general principles governing recreation programs should bes 

lo Primary emphasis should be on mass appeal ard free playo 

2.0 Heavy capital investment should not be incurred unless the 
installation will qualify under #1 above, 

3o Adult programs should be self-supporting and 9 as nearly as 
possible f self-administrefio 

h„ Teenage and pre-school age programs having limited appeal 
(patronage) should be self-supported either by the parent? 
or booster clubs, or discontinued.. 

5o Programs should be inaugurated, or continued s only when a 
spontaneous public desire has been demonstrated ., The 
public should not be proselyted or pressured to participate „ 

6o Existing programs should be reviewed periodically, and 

those not having general acceptance should be promptly dis- 
continued 

7° Programs evidencing lack of attendance at certain locations, 
due to changing population patterns, etc , should be dis- 
continued at those locations o 

The 1S&7 "Report on a study of the proposed consolidation of the 
Park and Recreation Departments" prepared by the budget staff of the 
Mayor's Office contains the following observations: 

Page 6, Paro 13 (in part): "Soaae of the facilities provided 
now or in the past have limited appeal and x-equire compara^ 
tlvely heavy unit costs o The propriety of free use of such 
facilities which appeal to persons who otherwise spend con~ 
siderable sums in pursuit of their hobbies say well be 
questioned a <> ° « » o » In any case more st ress s hould be lai d o n 
programs with mass' appeal and less on those requiring expen- 
sive equipment that can be used by onSy"a limTbed number of 
particlpantsT " (Underlining addedol 



23 



EEC PARK 

Page 52s "'Free Play' versus Organized Programs » There is, In 
Francisco at least, an expressed disbelief in organised play - 
the opinion that it means forcing little Johnnie to play tiddly- 
winks when he vould rather kick a football around „ The facili~ 
ties should be available for 'free play,* for uses expressing 
the individual wishes of the users » Hence the Park Department 
has kept playground supervision 0.0000 down to the minimum , a > 9 
In many of these matters the Recreation enthusiasts are moti° 
vated by other considerations Their thinking is based 
primarily on the idea of organized programs of play, with 
character formation as an end product, as in the school <=• just 
as, in fact, their activities differ little from many which 
are provided for children during school hours and for adults in 
the eveningo" 

The above observations have the same validity today as in 19^7° 

Attendance 

No attempt is made to record the actual number of persons attending 
the i?ecreation programs* The records relate to "units of attendance „" 
Thus, a child participating in several programs during the day may be 
counted as many as five times, onee for each of three count times and 
once for each programo As an example, the report of the Drama and Dance 
Section includes in their figures attendance at the following Special 
Events ass 

Carnival at Stern Grove 7,798 

Photography Day 3*560 

Joseph Lee Day 1*370 

and the Music Section includes in their attendance report? 

Carnival at Stem Grove 6 f 6kk 

Photography Day 3*535 

Joseph Lee Day 1,270 

Obviously the same persons are included in total figures twice „ 
The same situation exists with the regular programs » If figures were 
available they would certainly show that the cost of a number of the 
programs, when Recreation Director, Music and Drama^ and Music Section 
costs were included, is very high per person participating „ high- 

cost organized programs with not too large participation, and which 
closely parallel the school curriculum, should be analyzed with the 
view of replacing them with other types of less expensive recreation o 



29 



RECREATION AED PARK 



An evaluation of the various programs should be based upoi 
actual number of persons attracted to the activity and not to the 
figures appearing in the Department •s annual report, which, in nearly 
all case&j, represent the sum of the persons present at three separate 
hours of each dayo Thua B one person present at each count time every 
day would appear in the report of attendance as 1,095* 

Specific Reccemendations 

lo Attendance records should be maintained to reflect the actual 
number of persons using the facilities for« 

Bo free play 

b a each organized program*- 

and reports should be made on this basis » 

2 Distinction should be made between purely recreational and 
educational or quasi -educational programs s and the latter should be 
left to the School Department u Many of the present programs in the 
Drama and Dance and Music Sections closely parallel the school cur- 
riculum and are conducted at high per-unit costo 

3<> Discontinue all programs not conforming to the general 
principles enumerated above 



30 






AUTOMOBILE USE 

Twenty automobiles are assigned to individuals rather than to 
department "divisions B " In 6oae cases , however, other supervisors or 
employees of the department may use the vehicles, when they are not in 
use by the assigned persono This is particularly true in the Recrea- 
tion Division, where the automobiles assigned to the Assistant Superin^ 
tendent and the Supervisor of Athletics -Male are used by others for 
field visits or meetings during the day work-hours, evenings, or week- 
end assignments o In addition, a station wagon is assigned to the 
Engineering Division . 



Division assignment of these automobiles is: 



Division 



Engineers 
Administration 
Park 

Recreation 
Total 



Number 
of Autos 

3 

U 

3 
21 



Toial 
Annual 

21,586 

1*3,625 

113,278 

.22,572 

gaum 



Mileage 

Annual Average 
Bar Auto (l) 

7,285 
10,906 
10,298 

9,587 Avgo 



(1) See Exhibit Vin for auto use detail. 



The average number of miles used may not be an accurate picture of 
actual usage in the ^ob operation, as most of these vehicles are parked 
or garaged at the assigned individual supervisor's or employee's resi= 
dence during evening hours o These are used for personal transportation 
to and from their place of work or headquarters, and some arc used for 
lunch period transportation 

Employee-owned automobiles are used as follows? 



Division 



Administration 
Engineers 
Bark 

Recreation 
Miscellaneous 
Total 



Average 

Ho. of 

Autos 

n 

12 

19 
2 

2 



Annual Usage (estimate) (2) 

Mileage Aaouet Due Amount B ald 



1^,196 

22,6m 

92,760 
3.108 

I3^OT 



1,1126.00 
2,101o00 
8,363»00 

310.00 

$16,216.06" 



(2) Based on average of 3 months 8 usage in 1960c 
breakdown of above figures on Exhibit IX » 



922,00 

l,391oOO 

5A97.00 

I890OO 

I71999T0O' 

IT T "tli 1.1 J T 

See additionsl 



31 



' AND PARK 



In most instances, Recreation supervisors use their personal 
automobiles when covering evening assignments, such as meetings, din- 
ners, recreation center activities, etc., and week-end supervisory 
responsibilities. A considerable amount of this type of work is done 
by these supervisors. 

There is a definite question as to the practicality, reasonableness 
or economical use of several of the permanently assigned vehicles. 
Examples ares 



Division 

Park 

Park 

Park 

Park 

Engineers 

Engineers 

Admin. 

Admin. 

Recreation 

Recreation 



Title 



Four (k) Supervisors of 
Buildings and Grounds 
Supervisor of Roads & Paths 
General Foreman Carpenter 
Supervisor Golf Course-Maint. 
Engineer 

Supervising Engineer 
Commissary 
Business Manager 
Asst. Supt. of Recreation 
Supervisor of Athletics 



Permanently Assigned Auto 

k - Ford 6, k Dr. Sedans 

Chev. 6, k Dr. Sedan 
Ford 6, k Dr. Sedan 
Rambler- AmerCar, k Dr. Sedan 
Rambler- AmerCar 6, k Dr. Sed. 
Chev. 6, h Dr. Sedan 
Rambler-AmerCar 6, k Dr. Sed. 
Stude. 8, k Dr. Sedan 
Rambler 6, h Dr. Sedan 
Chev. 6, k Dr. Sedan 



Specific Recommendations 

1» Another type of vehicle, such as a pick-up truck, would be 
better able to cover "in the field" operations of the seven Park 
Division personnel. (First four items above.) The transportation of 
tools, hoses, materials, etc. would be accomplished more quickly and 
economically. The truck should be returned to the main yard at close 
of each day. The presently used sedans should be transferred to the 
pool when trucks have been provided. 

2. A car pool should be established at the main yard. Of the 
total of 18 cars, exclusive of the Engineers Division, seven would be 
assigned full time to specific positions, and 11 would be in the pool. 
It is possible that experience will indicate that some reduction in the 
pool could be made. The seven permanent assignments should be 

General Manager 
Superintendent of Grounds 
Superintendent of Maintenance 
Four District Supervising Directors. 

3. All other personnel would obtain cars from the pool upon 
proper authorization. This would require forward planning of work by 
these persons and a "scheduled in advance" requisitioning of automo- 
biles. 

All automobiles, except the General Manager's and those 
authorized for evening or overnight business use, would be returned to 
the pool at close of business each day. 



32 



.! AND PARK 



k. The car pool should he operated under the following systems 

a. Limit allocation of automobiles to individual use and 
prohibit use of city»owned cars for personal purposes s 
such as to and from home, lunch, etco 

b. Management of the pool should be placed with the present 
personnel in Administration and Business Division,. 

Co Require pool cars to be returned to pool at end of each 
day, except when properly authorized for evening and 

week-end use., 

do Require advance scheduling of pool-car use to permit 
pool supervisor to efficiently allocate use and provide 
authorization and record forms for this purpose. 

e. Reduce use of personal automobiles and require management 
approval for such use in city business. Provide author! « 
zation and use forms to record and control this use. 

f o Provide full reimbursement for authorized use of personal 
automobiles. 

g. Obtain verification that adequate insurance coverage is 
carriecl on use of personal automobiles. 

5° Recording forms should be introduced to permit accurate 
recording of the use of each car and from which periodical reports 
could easily be compiled. Also institute requisition authorizing 
release of cars by main yard pool custodian and form on which he reports 
its return to pool supervisor. 

NOTE: Pool supervisor and pool custodian duties can be 
handled by present personnel. No new positions 
required. 



33 



RECREATIOH AMD ?P$X. 



LIMITATION ON AMOUNT OF FUNDS ALLOCATED TO 
RECREATION AND PARK PURPOSES 

During the last ten years the cost of Recreation and Park 
activities has steadily increased, and present indications are that 
the current high level will continue for some time. (Exhibit X) 

Gross expenses (exclusive of bond service) have increased from 
$1^,75^,000 in 1951 to an estimated figure of $9,815,000 in fiscal I96I, 
and bond service has increased in the same period from $177,000 to 
$1,102,000. During this period revenue generated has increased but 
little, from $1,127,000 to $1,258,000. Thus, the cost of operations 
and capital requirements has increased 153*8$ over the cost in 1951 • 
(Exhibits XI and XII) The portion of the ad valorem tax rate required 
to cover these costs is 83. 18 cents or ^.k'fo over the 1951 figure of 
U2. 78 cents; the percentage of the ad valorem rate is 9-8l# or 1*4.2$ 
over the 1951 figure of 6.8$. 

The Consumers Price index during these ten years has risen 25.6$, 
while the cost of government represented by the ad valorem tax rate 
has risen 3^»8#j but the portion devoted to Recreation and Park 
purposes has risen 9koU$. 

This rapid and continuing increase is made possible by the absence 
of any limiting provision in the charter as presently written. The 
charter prior to 1932 provided a maximum amount to be devoted to 
Recreation and Park purposes of 17^ in the tax rate; 10^ for Recreation 
and 7$ for Parks o Upon adoption of the present charter in 1932, 
Section 78 was written to provide that these former maxima become the 
minima without making any provision for a ceiling on the amount to be 
devoted to these purposes. 

Comparison of San Francisco Bscreation and Park costs with those 
of other cities is not easily made owing to the many different con- 
cepts of accounting and responsibility. However, whatever method is 
used indicates that San Francisco is a very high cost city. The fact 
that San Francisco is a combined city and county government does not 
prevent comparison with other city governments, for there are 
contiguous to San Francisco many recreation areas which are available 
(Exhibits III and IV). Perhaps the best comparison is that provided 
by the Census Bureau, for while the Bureau figures include museums, 
auditoriums, etc. not included in the Recreation and Park budget and 
exclude capital expenditures, they nevertheless provide a uniform 
basis of comparison. The Census Bureau figures for 1959, the latest 
available figures, show San Francisco's per capita expense for park 
and recreation purposes to be exceeded only by Washington, D.C. in 
cities of comparable population. (Exhibits XIII, XIV, and XV) 

As bond service costs for Recreation and l&rk purposes will 
remain at, or about at, present levels through 1969, (Exhibit XVT) 
San Francisco 's Recreation and Park costs cannot be immediately re- 
duced to levels comparable with other cities, but it is imperative 
that these costs should be limited by statute. 



3* 



RECREATION AMD PARK 



S pecific Recommendations - Charter Change 

1. Amend Section TS of the Charter to eliminate the minimum and 
establish a maximum amount, expressed as a number of cents in the tax 
rate, vhich may be devoted to Recreation and Park purposes. To the 
funds so determined vculd be added the revenue generated. This total 
amount would then be applied first to bond interest and retirement 
requirements, and the remainder to operating expense and capital 
expenditures. 

2. Also amend the Charter to provide that any funds so 
appropriated but not used in the current year shall be earmarked for 
use in future years for capital expansion. 

3. The initial maximum should reflect the cost reductions 
recommended in this report. 

k. Provision should be made to review the maximum limit 
periodically, particularly when the bond service requirements diminish, 
to determine the propriety of a downward revision of the maximum. 

5. The figures in Exhibit X indicate that this maximum should be 
fixed initially at 6k cents per $100 assessed value of real property. 

These recommendations will result in more efficient operation by 
making mandatory certain procedures which are the subject of ether 
recommendations, vizt 

1. Curtail or eliminate programs which have only limited appeal 
unless self-supporting, including cost of supervision and indirect 
costs. 

2. Establish more realistic work norms and rearrange duties, 
eliminating excess positions and improving supervision. 

3. Project future costs of contemplated new installations and 
programs to insure staying within statutory limit. 

k» Provide mutual planning with School Department for future 
expansion to avoid the duplication of facilities, and 

5. Obtain full cooperation with School Department for full time 
use of both school and recreation facilities under a single super- 
vision after school hours » (This may require amending Section 1+2 of 
the Charter.) 

6. Increase the income derived from operations by charging for 
certain activities now free, and charging more realistically for 
others . 



35 




RECREATION AND PARK 

EXHIBIT I 



LEGEND 

PROPOSED 

A PLAYLOT 

A PLAYGROUND 

A PLAYFIELD 

m PARK -UNDER I ACRE 

JQP PARK- 1-5 ACRES 
Gilfe PARK - 5-10 ACRES 
Up PARK - OVER 10 ACRES 

PARKWAY TREATMENT 

| CENSUS BOUNDARY 

—$— COMMUNITY BOUNDARY 

EXISTING 

© ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 

© ELEMENTARY SCHOOL ANNEX 

® HIGH SCHOOL OR JR. HIGH 

A PLAYLOT 

A PLAYGROUND 

A PLAYFIELD 

^ PARK 

®\(ZSs SUPERVISED SCHOOL YARD 
^^ PLAYGROUND 



1 NIGHT GYM 

10TH SCHO 
AND NIGHT GYM 



QQBOTH SCHOOL YARD PLAYGROUND 



RECREATION 
AND PARK 

LOCATIONS 



RECREATIOH AND PARK 
EXHIBIT I 



PROPOSFD 

A PLAYLOT 

PLAYGROUND 

PLAYFIELD 

PARK -UNDER I ACRE 
OP PARK- 1-5 ACRES 
£& PARK - 5-10 ACRES 

PARK - OVER 10 ACRES 

PARKWAY TREATMENT 
"CENSUS BOUNDARY 
"3~ COMMUNITY BOUNDARY 

EXISTING 

© ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 

ELEMENTARY SCHOOL ANNEX 
® HIGH SCHOOL OR JR. HIGH 

PLAYLOT 

PLAYGROUND 

PLAYFIELD 

PARK 



AA BOTH SCHOOL YARD PLAYGROUND 
**Jw AND NIGHT GYM 



RECREATION AMD PARK 
EXHIBIT II 



PER CENT OF CITY AREA IN RECREATION AND PARK FACILITIES 
AND ACRES PER 100 POPULATION 
CITIES WITH 500,000 — 1,000,000 POPULATION* 1 ' 
AND UNDER 100 SQUARE MILES IN AREA 



Washington, D„ C. 
Milwaukee, Wisconsin 
San Francisco, California 
Buffalo, New York 
Baltimore, Maryland 
Boston, Massachusetts 
St<> Louis, Missouri 
Cincinnati, Ohio 
Cleveland, Ohio 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 
Seattle, Washington 

(1) - I960 Census 

(2) - Includes park facilities administered by 

National Park Service,, 



Per Cent 
of City 

Area 


Acres 

Per 100 

Population 


16.5< 2 ' 


c96 


15 cO 


lol9 


Ho 5 


o^3 


11.0 


o57 


10.9 


o&r 


10o2 


M 


8o2 


M 


7o8 


068 


7o6 


cU2 


6„5 


,38 


5*5 


«57 



Fe deral 

Marin County 

San Francisco County 

Hapa County 
Total Federal 
State 

Alameda County 

Contra Costa County 

Marin County 

San Francisco County 

San Mateo County 

Solano County 

Santa Clara County 

Napa County 

Sonoma County 

Santa Cruz 
Total State 
County 

Contra Costa County 

Marin County 

San Francisco County 

San Mateo County 

Santa Clara County 

Napa County 

Sonoma County 
Total County 

Alameda County 
Contra Costa County 
Marin County 
San Mate© County 
Solano County 
Santa Clara County 
Napa County 
Sonoma County 
Santa Cruz County 

Total City 
Recreati on District 
ATarnioa^CounEy" 
Contra Costa County 
Marin County 
San Mateo County 
Solano County 
Santa Clara County 
Sonoma County 
Santa Cruz County 

Total Recreation 
District 



RECREATION AND PARK 

EXHIBIT III 
(Page 1 of two pages) 
RECREATION LAND HOLDINGS IN ACRES 
(Nine Bay Area Counties and Santa Cruz~Cbunty) 

Bot. & Wildlife 

Nat. Refuges 
A reas & Ranges Total 



Parks & Recrea 
tion Areas 



Total 

1*85 

19,250 



Hist. 
Monu- 
Developed ments 



iklSL 



2,^97 

^,877 

21*. 

1*,001 

123 

12,161 

1,137 
13.267 

38*08T 



1,^31 
186 

1,133 

2,500 

7,207 

1 

105 



2,71*2 
633 
632 

1,101* 

*6l*l* 

3*229 

812 

We 



8,330 
33 

8 

152 
26 

3 

3 § 



105 
111 

100 



16 

T*91 



8 

5 

3,633 

800 

6,692 

1 

90 
11,229" 



2,218 

556 

516 

1,000 

1*1*9 

1,^71 
811 

21*7 
230 

77m- 



8,309 

21 

6 

11*6 

26 

3 

23 



1*85 
91 
19,250 
9TC — J9JBgg 



91 



396 
80 
1 
T*W 



^70 1*70 

2,1*97 

M77 
21* 

1*,001 

10,1*87 10, 611 

12,161 

72 U68 

317 1,53!* 
13,268 

"Wf 10,559 ^9,911 



1,1*31 
186 

fc,133 

2,500 

7,207 

1 

105 

15,563 



2,7U2 
633 

632 

l,10l4 

610* 

3*229 

812 

573 

656 

MS 



8,330 
33 

8 

152 

26 

3 

3 § 



8,588 8^0 



8,583 



RECREATION AND PARK 

EXHIBIT III 
(Page 2 of two pages ) 





Parks 


& Recrea- 


Hist. 


Bote & Wildlife 






tion Areas 


Monu- 


Nat= 


Refuges 






Total 


Developed 


ments 


Areas 


& Ranges 


Total 


Unclassified 














Marin County 


29 










29 


Total Unclassified 


29 










29 


Grand Total 


93,02? 


27,761 


U78 


787 


10,650 


10Jv,9te 


Total Acreages 














By Counties 














Alameda 


U 5 072 


10,527 




1^70 




11,5^2 


Contra Costa 


fc,59fc 


690 








4,59^ 


Marin 


6,217 


6ta 








6,217 


San Francisco 


^157 


3,633 






91 


k,2k8 


San Mateo 


7,757 


2,6k6 








7,757 


Solano 


793 


U75 


1 




10,U87 


11,281 


Santa Clara 


22,600 


8,166 








22,600 


Napa 


20,063 


812 


396 




72 


20,531 


Sonoma 


1,9*5 


376 


80 


317 




2,2US 


Santa Cruz 


13*929 


395 


1 






13,930 




93,027 


27,761 


1*78 


787 


10,650 


io>*,9te 



Sources "California Public Outdoor Recreation Plan «• Part II" 
Published July^ i960, by California Public Outdoor 
Recreation Plan Committee <> 



RECREATION AMD PARK 
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.'HON AMD PARK 
EXHIBIT V 



San Francisco Unified School District 
Schools Adjacent to Recreation-Park Units 



Schools 

A. P, Giannini Jr. High (G) 

Mark Twain 

Aptos Jr.. High (Supervised evenings-G) 

Bret Harte (Supervised evenings-G) 

Burnett (Supervised schoolyard to supplement 

limited outdoor facilities at Joseph 

Lee) 
Geary 
Longfellow 

Marina Jr. High (Supervised evenings~G) 
Miralonia (Supervised evenings-G) 
Ulloa (Supervised evenlngs-G) 
Visitaeion Valley 
West Portal 



Recreation Units 

Vest Sunset 
West Sunset 
Aptos 

Oilman 



Joseph Lee 
Laurel Heights 
Alice Chalmers 
Funs ton 
Miraloma 
South Sui. 
Visitaeion Valley 
West Portal 



Benjamin Franklin Jr 

Douglas 

Grattan 

Mission High (G) 

Pelton Jr. High (G) 

Starr King 



Hot Adjacent hut Across the Street 
High (G) 



Hamilton 
Eureka Valley 
Grattan 
Mission Park 
Silver Terrace 
Potrero Hill 



(G) Gymnasium at school location 



;REATION AND PARK 

EXHIBIT VI 
(Page 1 of two pages) 



RECREATION FACILITIES USED BY VARIOUS 
SCHOOLS DURING SCHOOL HOURS 



Recreation Unit 



School 



ALTA PLAZA 
APTOS 

BALBOA 



BIG REC 
LITTLE REC 
CHBJISE CENTER 



KEZAR PARKING AREA 

GOLDEN GATE PARK PANHANDLE 

DU PONT TENNIS COURTS 

EUREKA VALLEY 



FOLSOM 
FUNSTON 



GRATTAN 
HAMILTON 
HAYWARD BOYS 

H4YWARD GIRLS 



JR. MUSEUM 
KAHNo Jo 

LARSENSQo 

McCOPPIN 

MISSION DOLORES PARK 

NORTH BEACH 



Town School Gym M - F 

Aptos Jr<> High Girls' and Boys' Gym Classes 

all year 
So Fo City College Men's and Women's Gym 

Classes M - F 
Balboa RCTC Friday 
Polytechnic Boys' Gym Classes M - F 
Polytechnic Boys' Gym Classes M - F 
Commodore Stockton Gym M-W-F 
Jo Parker Gym T-Th 
Sto Mary's T»Th 
Polytechnic ROTC as needed 
Lowell Boys' Gym Classes M-F 
Presidio Jr. High Girls' and Boys' 

Tennis T-W 
Douglas School Boys' Gym Classes and 

lunch period M-F 
Most Holy Redeemer Gym Classes 
Hawthorne Gym M-F 

Sto John's Lutheran Gym and lunch M-F 
Marina Jr., High Gym Classes 
Stuart Hall Gym Classes M-F 
Miss Burke's as needed 
Grattan School Gym Classes 
Bo Franklin Gym Classes M-F 
Sacred Heart Gym Classes M-F 
Sto Paul's School Gym and Lunch M-F 
Cathedral School Lunch and Gym 
Laguna Nursery Lunch and Play Periods 
Golden Gate Nursery Lunch and Play Periods 
Science Classes visit during School Hours 
Wilkins' Private School uses it for 

their Gym Periods 
St. Cecilia's Boys and Girls at Lunchtime 
A. Lincoln Boys' Gym Classes 
Boys' and Girls' Gym Classes M-F 

ROTC K - F 
Francisco Jr. High Boys' and Girls' Gym 

Classes M-F 



RECREATION AND PARK 

EXHIBIT VI 
(Page 2 of two pages) 



Recreation Unit School 



PARKSIDE SQ. 

PORTOLA Kittredge Private School Boys' and Girls' 

ROCHAMBEAU Gym Classes M - F 

ROLPH St. Peter '8 Boys' Gym Classes Monday a.m. 

ROSSI Roosevelt Jr. High Boys' Gym Classes M - F 

ST„ MARY'S St. John's High School Girls' Gym Classes 

Thurso a.m. 
SOUTH SUNSET St. Gabriel's Grammar School Boys* Gym 

Classes M - F 
Ulloa School on occasion 
SUNSET Talmudical Seminary daily M - F 

UPPER NOE St. Paul's High School Girls' Gym Classes 

T-Th. 
VISITACION VALLEY Visltacicn Valley School Gym Classes M - F 

WEST SUNSET Giannini Jr. High School Gym Classes M «» F 



Swimming Pools 

Fleishhaeker 

Hamilton 

Balboa 

North Beach 

Rossi 

McLaren 

Mission 

Larsen 



M » Monday 
T - Tuesday 
W - Wednesday 
Th «- Thursday 
F » Friday 



EXHIBIT VII 

(Bag* l^of^our^egea ) 

Saa Francisco Unified School System 
SCHOOLS USING RECREATION FACILITIES AFTER SCHOOL HOURS 



Recreation 
Facility 

ALTA PLAZA 



APTOS 



BALBOA 



BEACH CHALET 



BIG REC 

CABRILLO 
CAYUGA 

CHALMERS 



School 



Emerson Grant 
Pacific Heights 
Town School 

Aptos Jr« 

High practice 
Jr<> High League 

Balhoa practice 
Lick Wilmerding 

practice 
So F City College 

practice 
Denman Jr» High 

practice 
Jr High League 
Sr„ High League 
S« Fo City College 

League 

Lincoln High practice 
Washington 
Polytechnic 
Lowell " 
AAA League Games 
Presidio Jr„ High 
Jr* High League Games 

Polytechnic practice 
Lowell " 
St» Ignatius " 
AAA League 
Jr» College League 

St, Thomas 
Lafayette School 

Benraan ?„ToAo 
Balboa P„ToA a 

Longfellow P e T A 



Fall 



Baseball 



Football 



Baseball 



Soccer 



as needed 



Winter 
All year 
All year 



All year 



Spring 



Soccer 



Baseball 



Baseball 



Soccer 



Baseball 






Recreation 
Facility 

CHINESE 
PLAYGROUND 



CHINESE 

CENTER 



COW HOLLOW 



School 



EXHIBIT VII 
(Page 2~oTT5ur~p6S2s) 



Fal l Winter Spring 



Co Stockton, J Parker as needed 
Redding, W. Irving* " 
Francisco, Marina, " 
Sherman, Cooper, 
Spring Valley, and 
Church schools " 

Stockton, Parker, " 
Redding, Irving, " 
Francisco, Marina, 
Sherman, Cooper, Han- 
cock, Spring Valley " 

Scott, Grant, Yerba " 

Buena, Burkes, Hamlin, " 

Town School, 

St. Vincent, St, Lukes, " 

Sacred Heart, and 

Kindergarten 



CROCKER 


Balboa practice 


Soccer 




AMAZON 


Mission " 


ii 






Burbank " 




Soccer 




Denraan " 




i> 




Pelton 




ri 




AAA League Games 


i> 






Jr Q High League Games 




ii 




Balboa J. V. 




Baseball 




AAA J V Q League 




tt 


DOUGLAS 


Jo Lick practice 




Soccer 


DUSOCE 


McKinley, Dudley Stone 


as needed 






Everett 


it tt 




DU PONT 


Washington practice 




Tennis 


COURTS 


Presidio High " 


Tennis 




FUNSTON 


Galileo practice 




Baseball 




Sacred Heart " 




n 




AAA League Games 




tt 




Marina Jr« High 








practice 


Baseball 






Jr« High League 


tt 






St» Brigids 


ss needed 






Sto Vincents 


it n 




GLEN PARK 


Mission J. V. practice 




Baseball 




Jr» High League Games 


Baseball 





Recreation 
Facility 

GOLDEN GATE 
TENNIS 



HAMILTON 
JACKSON 

McCOPPXN 



MISSION 

DOLORES PARK 

NORTH BEACH 
OCEAN VIEW 



PORTOLA 



'.HON AND PARK 
EXHIBIT VII 
(Page 3 of four pages) 



School 



Rail 



Winter 



AAA Tournament 

So Fo City College 

Hatches 
Uo So Fo Matches 
Lowell practice 
Poly 

Sto Ignatius practice 
Washington 

B. Franklin practice 



Spring 
Tennis 



Tennis 



Tennis 



1 snnia 



Closed at present, but usually takes care of Mission, 
Horace Mann B and Everett for baseball and tracko 



Lineoln practice 
Lincoln J* V« practice 
Lincoln practice 

Mission J. V. practice 
Mission practice 

Francisco practice 

So Fo City College 

practice 
Jr. College League 

games 
Jr. High League games 
Balboa J« V» practice 
Jo V League games 

Portola Jr« High practc 
Jr. High League Games 
Portola practice 
Portola practice 



Baseball 



Soccer 

Football 
Soccer 



Soccer 



Basketball 



ROLPH 


Horace Mann practice 
Horace Mann " 


ROSSI 


Roosevelt Jro High " 
St. Ignatius Jr " 
Jr High League 


SILVER 

TERRACE 


Pelton Jr. High 

Jr. High League Games 


WEST SUNSET 


A„ P» Giannini Jr« Hii 



Baseball 



Baseball 



SPEEDWAY 
MEADOWS 



practice 
AAA League Games 
Jr. High League Games 

Washington J. V. 
practice 



(:OCC : i?~ 



Soccer 
Baseball 



Socc ... 



S;iec ::•. 



Baseball 



Track 



Soccer 
Baseball 



Ba3eba.ll 



RECREA'HCM AHD PARK 

EXHIBIT VII 
(Page k of four pages) 



Recreation 
Facility 


School 


Fall 


Winter 


Spring 


GOLDEN GATS 
PARK 

STADIUM 


AAA League 

Lowell practice 
Sacred Heart practice 
Lowell Jo Vo 
Sacred Heart Jo V„ 

practice 
Jo Vo League Games 


Football 
n 

it 

n 

tt 




Cross 
Country 



LITTLE REG* 



Polytechnic practice 
Polytechnic Jo Vo 
practice 



Football 



REGgTSfcTXOM -"J PARK 
EXHIBIT Vllf 



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EXHIBIT XI 

RECREATION & 

PARK 



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EXHIBIT XII 
RECREATION AND PARK 



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oo r» r~ 



RECREATIOi, 



1959 GROSS EXPENDITURES FOR RECREATION AND PARK 
EXCLUDING CAPITAL OUTLAY 



( Cities having population of 500,0 00 to l c 000 o 000 in 1950 Censug ) 



City 


Population 
802,178 


Expenditures 
$7,828,000 


Gross Cosu 
Per Capita 


Washington, D.C f 


$9e75 


San Francisco 


775 P 357 


7,446,000 


9*60 


Minneapolis 


521,718 


3,948,000 


7o56 


St, Louis 


856 f 796 


6,006,000 


7o01 


Boston 


801,444 


4,952,000 


6,18 


Baltimore 


949 o 708 


5,368,000 


5ol5 


Cleveland 


914,808 


4,891,000 


5o34 


Pittsburgh 


676,808 


3,441,000 


5o09 


Buffalo 


580,132 


2,891,000 


4c98 


New Orleans 


570,445 


2,715,000 


4o76 


Cincinnati 


503,998 


2,266,000 


4o49 


Milwaukee 


637,392 


2,577,000 


4»04 


Houston 


596,163 


2,254.000 


3o78 



Source: U C S, Bureau of the Census "Compendium of City Government 
Finances in 1959*" 













RECREATION i 
EXHIBIT 






XIV 


1959 NET EXPENDITURES FOR RECREATION AND PARK 
EXCLUDING CAPITAL OUTLAY 


) Census) 




(Cities havirw? population of 500,000 to 1,000,000 


in 19 » 




City 


Population 

1950 

Census 

802 „ 178 


Gross 
Expenditures 

7,828,000 


Revenue 
Generated 

135,000 


% 
of 

Gross 

Ex- 

pense 

lo7 


Net 

Expenditure 

7,693,000 


Cost 

per 

Capi.1 - 


Washington 


9c59 


San Francisco 


775,357 


7,446,000 


1,700,000 


22*8 


5,746,000 




Boston 


801, 444 


4,952,000 


122,000 


2,4 


4,830,000 




St. Louis 


856,796 


6,006,000 


1,054,000 


17»5 


4,952,000 




Pittsburgh 


676,806 


3,441,000 


31,000 


0,9 


3,410,000 


5o04 


Minneapolis 


521,718 


3,948,000 


1,427,000 


36,1 


2,521,000 




Baltimore 


949,708 


5,368,000 


961,000 


17o9 


4,407,000 


4o64 


Buffalo 


580,132 


2,891,000 


449,000 


15o5 


2,442,000 


4o21 


Cincinnati 


503,998 


2,266,000 


360,000 


15 o9 


1,906,000 


3o78 


Cleveland 


914,808 


4,891,000 


1,513,000 


30,9 


3,378,000 


3o69 


New Orleans 


570,445 


2,715,000 


772,000 


28,4 


1,943,000 


3o41 


Milwaukee 


637,392 


2,577,000 


575,000 


22o3 


2,002,000 




Houston 


596,163 


2,254,000 


538,000 


23 o4 


1,716,000 


2o88 


All Cities Except 
Washington and 
San Francisco 


7,609,410 


41,309,000 


7,802,000 


18o8 


33,507,000 


4,40 


All Cities Except 
Washington, San 
Francisco, Boston 
and Pittsburgh 


6,131,160 


32,916,000 


7,649,000 


23o2 


25,267,000 





Source: U„,S ( . Bureau of the Census "Compendium of City Government 
Finances in 1959 o" 



EXHIBIT XV 
RECREATION AND PARK 




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o> r- r- 



RECREATION AND BARK 

"" EKHtei* XVI ' " 



TABULATION OF MATURITIES 
RECREATION AND PARK BOND ISSUES 



Outstanding 



1947 
Issue 



1955 
Issue 



Total 
Redemption 



Outstanding 6/30/60 



$6,013,000 3 $ 460, 000 



Total 
O utstanding 

9,473,000 



Maturing to 6/30: 1961 


622,000 


260,000 


882,000 


8,591,000 


1962 


677,000 


260,000 


937.-000 


7,654,000 


1963 


692,000 


260,000 


952,000 


6,702,000 


1964 


747,000 


260,000 


1,007,000 


5,695,000 


1965 


707,000 


260,000 


967,000 


4,728,000 


1966 


613,000 


260,000 


873,000 


3,855,000 


1967 


460,000 


260,000 


720,000 


3,135,000 


1968 


460,000 


260,000 


720,000 


2,415,000 


1969 


460,000 


260,000 


720,000 


1,695,000 


1970 


295,000 


260,000 


555 c OOO 


1,140,000 


1971 


200,000 


260,000 


460,000 


680,000 


1972 


so,ooo 


260,000 


340,000 


340,000 


1973 


- 


260,000 


260,000 


80,000 


1974 


- 


60,000 


60,000 


20,000 


1975 


- 


20,000 


20,000 


=> 



,013,000 3 I 460,0O0 9,473,000 



Authorized but unissued 



3,100,000 



..CIOK AHD PARK 



RECRSATIOK AMD PARK COMMISSIOH 

Page Hoc 

Functions *7 

37 



Organization 

Meetings 39 

Specific Recossaendations 



36 



OH AND PARK 

BBEREAI3CCIB AMD PARK CQMg SSIjDH 

Functiona 

The Recreation and Park Commission acts in the following functional 
groups : 

1. Executive: 

(a) Selection of the General Manager of the Department 

(b) Reviews and approves, or passes resolutions recommending 
approval of administrative actions. 

(c) Approves use of Recreation and Park locations and 
facilities by hobby, civic, commercial, and other 
groups or individuals . 

(d) Approves contracts with concessionaires or lessees. 

(e) Review and approve plans for development of facilities. 

2. Quasi-* legislative; 

(a) Establishment of policies or formulation of reeonnenda- 
tions on policies. 

(b) Controls revenues and passes on budgets, requests for 
appropriation, transfers of funds and special expandi° 
tures, such as progress and final payments on contracts. 

(c) Controls expenditures from bond funds and public trust 
funds. 

3. Quasiojudlclal: 

(a) Hearing appeals from the public regarding proposed plans. 

Organization 

The Recreation and Park Commission is composed of seven members 
appointed by the Mayor for staggered four=year terms. At least two 
m em bers must be women. The Commission members elect a President and a 
Vice President from among their members. 



37 



. PARK 



misaioner is Chairman of a c u-ned with specie] 

i.zed activities of the Department and, in turn, is Co=Chairman of anothe 
committee. Current primary committee assignments are as follows: 



Commissioner Haas 
(President) 



Budgets and finance 
Maintenance of buildings, strut 

equipment 
Public relations 
Small boats 



Commissioner Coffman 
(Vice President) 



Candlestick Park 

Kezar Stadium and Pavilion 

Aquatic Park 

Maritime Museum 



Commissioner Bercut 



Commissioner Casey 



Equestrian activities 
Trails and roadways 
Irrigation systems 
Maintenance of parks 

Personnel 

Recreation programs 

Camping 

Maintenance of playgrounds 



Commissioner Conway 



Golf courses 

Boat Harbors 

Leases and concessions 

Land acquisition and sales 



Commissioner Hers 



McLaren Park 
Palace of Pine Arts 
Coit Tower 
Hall of Flowers 



Commissioner Koore Arboretum 

Horticultural development 
and maintenance 
Japanese Tea Garden 
Zoological Gardens 
Storyland 

As a committee chairman, the Commissioner works with staff members 
o: the Department in studying problems, developing recommendations to 
be submitted to the full Commission, and presenting recommendations for 
Commission approval; reviewing proposed plans and programs and making 
recommendations thereon to the Commission, and handling public contacts 
on assigned activities. 

The President of the Recreation and Pari Consaission is an ex-offidc 
member of the board of trustees of the California Palace of the Legion 
of Honor, Art Commission, and the board of trustees of the H. M. de 
Memorial Museum. 



38 



RECRii: -J liU PARK 



In addition to the Commissioners, there is a Secretary to the 
Commission (vho also acts as an Executive Secretary to the General 
Manager of the Department) and a clerk-steno. 

Meetings 

Regularly scheduled meetings of the Recreation and Park Commission 
are held on the second and fourth Thursday of each month. Special meet- 
ings may he called uhen action must be taken before deadlines, such as 
expiration of bids unless contract awarded within 21 days of opening 
bids, or important plans on which action must be expedited. 

Specific Recommendation s 

1. Within provisions of the Charter, establish policies and 
administrative rules to permit the General Manager to approve specific 
actions without ratification of the Ccamission. 

Examples: 

(a) Granting licenses for mooring of boats at the Yacht 
Barbo**° 

(b) Scheduling use of Recreation and Park properties for 
public meetings or for other purposes. 

(c) Scheduling of floral displays at the Conservatory or 
Civic Center Plaza. 

(d) Progress or final payments on contracts previously 
approved by the Commission. 

(e) Permits tc locate or relocate public utility facilities. 

(f ) Routine orders for work and/or service. 

(g) Property damage claims under specified monetary limits. 

2. Charter changes 

(a) Eliminate the executive and administrative functions 

presently performed by the Recreation and Park Coasissicn; 
limit the functions to; 

(1) Providing opportunities for the public to express 
views relative to plans to construct or reconstruct 
facilities, or relative to policies. 

(2) Providing advice to the Mayor and ths General 
Manager relative to policies regarding recreation 
and park facilities and programs. 



39 



• .' AND PARK 



This action will strengthen the authority, responsibility, and 
accountability of the General Manager and Division Heads in the 
Department e It will also eliminate the by»passlng of the General 
Manager by Commissioners in dealing with staff members. 

(b) Delegate to the General Manager present authorities 
granted the Commission in existing Charter Sections: 

(1) Acceptance of gifts and donations in the name of 
the Department. (Section 19d) 

(2) Appointment of non-civil service and exempt employees. 
(Section SO) 

(3) Approve budget for submission to Mayor for review 
prior to approval by the Board of Supervisors. 
(Section 69) 

(k) Requests for allocation of appropriations. 
(Section 72) 

(5) Transfer of funds. (Section 77) 

(6) Award of contracts to low bidders, or reject bids. 
(Section 95) 

(7) Others as necessary. 



1*0 






Ill 

RECREAfflOK MP PARK EEPAKEMEBT 

Page Ho. 

Functions *& 

Organization ^2 

Specific Reeonsaendations *»3 

Maritime Museum ^5 
Exhibits XVII and XVIII 



hi 



RECREATIOB AW PARK 

RECRE ATIOH ABD PARK DEPARTMEBT 

Functions 

The Recreation and Park Department 1b responsible for the planning, 
development, operation, and maintenance of recreation and park properties 
and programs and the negotiations and contractural arrangements vith 
lessees and concessionaires using Recreation and Park Department 
properties or facilities. 

Organization 

The elements of the organization as found when this study started 
vere: 

1. The Recreation and Park Commission. 

2. The General Manager and his staff. 

3. Divisions: 

a. Administration and Business Division 

b. Recreation Division 
Co Park Division 

d. Engineering Division 
So Zoo Division 

(See Present Organization Chart, Exhibit XVII ) 

A discussion of the Recreation and Park Commission has preceded 
and recommendationo have been made regarding its proposed functions 
and responsibilities. 

Each of the Divisions is treated in succeeding sub= sections of 
this task force report. 

The General Managei* 9 s position was established by Charter amend - 
Rent prior to the merger of the Recreation and Park Departments in 
1950. The General Manager is appointed by and responsible tc 
Recreation and Park Commission for administration of policies and 
procedures established by that body. 

The General Manager's personal staff consists of: 

1. An Executive Secretary, (B-86), who also acts as Secretary, 

Recreation and Park Commission. 
8. A Senior Clerk - Stenographer (B=fcl2). 
3» A Recreation Director (R»53) wbo acts in the capacity of 

publicity writer and public information representative. 
k« A Chauffeur (0«l) who drives the City car assigned to the 

General Manager. 



k2 



PARK 



Specific Recommendations 

1. Include the Recreation and Park Department in the proposed 
Culture and Recreation Department. (See proposed "Reorganization Plan" 
in a separate section of this report ) <> 

2. Delegate to the General Manager the necessary authority for 
management and administrative actions necessary for the accomplishment 
of objectives and responsibilities assigned to him. Hold him account- 
able for prosecution of policies developed by the proposed Cultural and 
Recreation Commission and approved at the proper executive level within 
the City and County management. Also, hold him accountable for the 
economic performance of the Department. 

3. a. Establish a position of Departmental Personnel officer 

(Code 1270) reporting to the General Manager. Examples 
of duties to be assigned to this position are: 

(1) Consults with and advises department management and 
supervisory personnel, employees and their representa- 
tives and others on the interpretation and application 
of the civil service provisions of the Charter, related 
ordinances, civil service rules and regulations, per- 
sonnel policies, standards, procedures, and other 
personnel problems. 

(2) Screens classification requests; conducts classification 
studies; advises management on the merits of requests 
for reclassification. 

(3) Cooperates with supervisory personnel in the assignment, 
reassignment, replacement, and transfer of personnel, 
and other related in-servies personnel activities. 

(k) Cooperates with the civil service commission in matters 
relating to the expediting of personnel transactions, 
recruitment, placement, employee evaluation, training 
programs and other personnel services and activities. 

(5) Supervises the preparation of personnel documents and 
maintenance of personnel records; analyzes personnel 
records to determine cause of turnover and otl 
related problems. 

(6) Reviews and reports on the service of employees; in- 
vestigates and reports on disciplinary charges against 
employees; investigates other related matters such as 
employee grievances, reductions in force and makee 
reports thereon. 



fc3 



... 



(7) May participate in conferences related in effective 
personnel services, budgeting, planning and over-all 
operation of the departmental personnel program. 

The number of employees in the Recreation and Park Department, 
both on a full- time or part-time basis, and the emphasis that 
should be placed on in-service training and performance 
evaluation justifies the establishment of this position. 

b. Utilize the authorized employment in the Recreation Division 
currently assigned to personnel activities and. one clerical 
employment in the Administration and Business Division to 
provide the manpower for staffing this proposed unit. 

k. Reclassify position of Recreation Director (R-58) assigned to 
publicity and public information to Publicity Representative. Evaluate 
the effectiveness of publicity activities in order to reduce the volume 
of news releases prepared and distributed. 

5. Eliminate the position of Chauffeur (O-l); cause the General 
Manager to drive bis own vehicle. 

The Proposed Organization Chart, Exhibit XVIII, reflects the 
proposed' changes. 






RECREATION AMD PARK 

maritime vosam 

Operation and Function 

The Maritime Museum, located in Aquatic Park, is operated by the 
San Francisco Maritime Association, a non-profit, educational corpora^ 
tion, vhich leases the building from the City for one dollar per year. 
The Museum houses a valuable collection of ship models, figureheads, 
bells, photographs, etc., donated by steamship companies and the general 
public interested in sea lore. There is also an excellent compact 
library for staff research. 

The Museum, under the direction of Carl Kortum, Director of the San 
Francisco Marltiioe Museum, has developed and grown to its present status 
through his untiring effort. The Museum opened in May, 1951. Attend- 
ance the first year was 225,000 and is currently at the rate of 200,000 
annually. 

In 195^ the San Francisco Maritime Association purchased the historic 
sailing ship Balclutha now on exhibit at Fishermans Wharf. The Balclutha 
attracts approximately 200,000 visitors paying 50^ each, resulting in 
gross revenue of $100,000 per year. This furnishes nearly all of the 
Museum's present operating income, for there is no charge at the build- 
ing itself. The balance comes from donations and members of San 
Francisco Maritime Association, who pay annual dues of $10. 

The cost of operation of the Balclutha and of the Museum except 
for the salary of the Director, who is a Civil Service employee of the 
City, comes from admission charges from the Balclutha. Park Division 
provides Janitorial, gardening, and security services from personnel 
assigned to Aquatic Pari:. 

Specific Recommendation 

1* Greater administrative control be exercised by the General 
Manager and the Director of the San Francisco Maritime Museum. While 
the Maritime Museum, and its related activities, is predominantly sup- 
ported by the San Francisco Maritime Association, the Director is paid 
by the City and is considered an employee of the Recreation and Park 
Department. 

2. Reschedule existing personnel to provide greater security 
coverage. This might be accomplished by assigning a Janitor to the 
h: 00 p.m. to midnight shift and rescheduling the watchman to the mid- 
night to 8:00 a.m. shift. 



^5 



RECREATION * PA RK 
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RECREATION AKD PARK 



IV 

AaamsmtisiciB ahp hjsikbss division 

Page Ko. 

Functions **7 

Organization ^7 

Specific Recossaandationa *& 
Exhibits XIX and XX 



k6 



RECREATION AND PARK 

AZftmST RATIOK m) RJSIBESS DIVISION 

Functions 

The Administration and Business Division is responsible for: The 
purchasing, accounting and payroll operations of the Department; pro* 
viding stenographic pool services for the Department; operation of Kezar 
Stadium and Pavilion, Candlestick Park, and the Municipal Yacht Harbor; 
supervision of contract commitments with all concessionaires who have 
contracts vith the Department; ticket sales at Story land; and the opera- 
tion of rides and the refreshment stand at Children's Playground in 
Golden Gate Park. 

Organization 

The Business Manager has direct supervision over all sections. Be 
negotiates all contracts for lease of the two stadia and the Pavilion, 
and the contracts for all concessions that are directly granted by the 
Department. Be also is responsible for the assembly, preparation and 
presentation of the annual budget of the Department. Through the 
Accounting and Purchasing Section, he is responsible for the administra- 
tion of the budget. He originates and follows through all requests for 
transfer of funds, and for supplemental appropriations. 

The division consists of a nus&er of sections which are summarized 
separately below: 

*■' Accounting : Receives the annual budget requests from each of 
the divisions, compiles and classifies Objects of Expenditure, and 
assembles data into proper form for presentation to the Commission and 
Mayor. Keeps records for control of expenditures vithin the budget. 

2. Personnel (Tiwe Rolls) : Receives daily time reports form 
employees of the Department, posts time to send^monthly payroll forms, 
computes and verifies Individual amounts to be paid (before taxes or 
other deductions). Payrolls are then sent to the Controller's office 
for completion of payroll work. 

3« Purchasing and Issuing s Receives field requisitions for ser- 
vices, supplies, and equipment, and prepares Request for Purchase Order 
forms and sends to City Purchaser. Keeps records of requisitions and 
Purchase Orders, and notifies Controller of receipt of goods and com- 
pletion of services. 

Orders and distributes Stores Items from Storerooms, and raain~ 
tains inventory of all Storekeeper items. 

k. Kegar St&divua & Pavilion and Candlestick Park : Stadium Manager 
has charge of all operations (except concessionaires) at Kesar Stadium 
and Pavilion, and of all activities other than Giant games at Candlestick 
Park. 



*7 



RECREATION AND PARK 



5. Commissary Units ; This section is responsible for the operation 
of rides and the refreshment stand at Children "a Playground, and for 
ticket sales at Storyland. (Refreshment stand at Pleishhacker Playfield 
was taken over by the Zoological Society in February, 196l- ) It also 
has the responsibility for supervising contract coamitments of concession 
aires at Xezar and all other department operations. 

6. Camp Mather s This is a summer camp in the Sierras. It accommo- 
dates about 2,600 people per season. The camp manager and a man in 
charge of reservations are "borrowed" from other sections. All other 
employees, except a full-time gardener, are temporary. 

7. Municipal Yacht Harbor : Harbormaster and Watchmen are responsible 
for policing and patrolling the Yacht Harbor. They assign visitors' 
berths, and keep a log of arriving and departing boats. Billing for 
berth space, reporting of payments, and re-assignment of vacated berths 
are presently done by an employee in the Business Manager °s office. 

8. Stenographic Section ; This section prepares letters, reports 
and mimeographed material for all divisions. 

(See Present Organization Chart, Exhibit XIX. ) 

Specific Recommendations 

1. Centralize all payroll work for the City, involving computation 
of amounts due, computation of deductions, and preparation of pay checks 
This could affect four employees in the Administration and Business 
Division. 

2. Transfer the following activities from the Personnel Time Roll 
Section: 

Activity Transfj- 

Posting time rolls Accounting Section 

Processing personnel forms Proposed Personnel Unit 

and records under General Manager 

3- Consolidate under one supervisor the operations now covered by; 



(I) 



Commissary Units 

Kesar (Stadium and Pavilion) and Candlestick Park 
(3) Camp Mather 



This would eliminate one position, which would be taken care of 
by the imminent retirement of the present stadium manager. 



UP. 



RECREATION AHD PARK 



h. Appoint replacements for retiring key employees prior to such 
retirement, and permit them to vork with said employees for a reasonable 
period of time prior to their retirement. This would save for the City 
the knowledge and experience gained by the key employees, which is 
presently lost. 

5. Put the entire operation of the Yecht Harbor in the hands of a 
Harbor Master, including assignment of berths, billing for berth space, 
and collection of such billed amounts. 

6. Consider the use of an Armored Car service instead of a city- 
employed cashier in collecting receipts from Department-operated units. 
This would eliminate the position of one BIO 3 Cashier and release one 
uniformed police officer and one City-owned vehicle for other use. It 
is believed that this would result in a reduced cost for this operation. 

7. Acquire a postage meter for use by the Stenographic section. 

8. Eliminate the position now held by a Head Clerk (B-23*0 upon 
his retirement this year. 

9. Reassign the duties of a Senior Bookkeeper (B-6) that pertains 
to the functions of the Business Manager, and return this employee to 

1 time vork in the Accounting Section, to ^hich his time is chart 

10. Give serious consideration to the coraolidstion of all Cit; 
accounting operations, in connection with a centralized data processing 
operation. This would reduce the need for the present decentralized 
departmental accounting units. This could affect 5 employees in the 
Administration and Business Division. 

The above reccBBaendations are reflected in the Propose! Organisation 
Chart, Exhibit XX. 



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RECREATION AND PARK 



RECREATION DIVISION 

Function 51 

Organisation 51 

Staffing 5^ 

Specific RecoEaaendationa 55 

Handling of Agreements and Reservations for Use of Special 6l 
Recreation Facilities 

Exhibits XXI and XXII 



50 



RECREATION AHD PARK 

RECREATION DIVISION 

Function * 

The Recreation Division under the direction of the Superintendent 
of Recreation and the Assistant Superintendent of Recreation is respon- 
sible for planning, supervising and directing the operation of free 
play areas, gymnasia, swimming pools, community recreation centers, 
camps, tennis courts, boating facilities and other recreational facili- 
ties composing a city-wide recreation program. 

Organization 

This Division (see Present Organization Chart, Exhibit XXX) is 
composed of the following sections: 

1. Athletics - (Male) : This section, under the supervision of a 
Supervisor of Athletics "-' (Male) (R105 or Code 32?6), consists of one 
Supervising Director and two Recreation Directors and is responsible 
for direction and coordination of city-wide recreation activities in 
four units of the Athletic Section (men and boys) as follows: 

(a) Industrial Association Athletic activities (men) 

(b) Adult and Boys" baseball leagues. 

(c) Boys" playground recreation leagues and tournaments in 
various sports. 

(d) City-wide recreation men s athletic programs. Examples 
Soccer and Softball. 

There appears to be some lost time in this operation due to a 
volume of schedules, rules and regulations, entry forms, as well as 
printed game, league and tournament results. 

2. Athletics - (Feipale) : This section, consisting of a Supervisor 
of Athletics - (Female) (R105 or Code 3276) and one Supervising 
Recreation Director, is responsible for coordination and supervision of 
the activities in three units of the athletic section (voaen and girls) 
and at the Golden Gate Tennis Clubhouse and courts. 

(a) Industrial Association women "s athletic activities. 

(b) Girl athletic playground leagues, tournaments and programs. 

(c) City-wide recreation woaen's athletic programs. 

3. Aquatics : This Section, consisting of the Supervisor of Aquatics 
(R106D or Code 3216), two Matrons - Swimming Pool (Clerk- Typist) on the 
staff, and 36 full tisse and 108 part-time employees operating the swim 
pools, plans, organizes, supervises and directs the city~wide aquatic 
activities, programs and facilities of the Recreation Division. The 
facilities include seven indoor and two outdoor pools, the Lake Merced 
Sport Center, Aquatic Park, and Phelan Beach. 



51 



RECREATIOH ahd park 



k, Dramatics and Dancing ;: This Section consists of the Supervisor 
of Dramatics and Dancing CRlOoA or Code 32te), a Supervising Director 
(U58) > a Seaastress and a Laundress on the staff, and 7 part-time dance 
instructors (R56 Ex. ) and 1 part-time Recreation Assistant. Also 2 full 
time Recreation Directors and 2 part-time Recreation Assistants are at 
Storylacd. This Section plans, assists in organizing, teaching, and 
directing the many adult and youth programs in the field houses. Also 
as many of these activities require music, there is a close tie-in with 
the Music Division. Instructs and supervises special groups who appear 
in Civic celebrations. 

5. Music : This Section consists of the Supervisor of Music (R106C 
or Code 325277 °Be part-time Recreation Director, two exempt Recreation 
Directors, and 22 pianists on call as needed. Provides music (pianists) 
for musical programs such as "Rhythm Singing n at various field houses. 
Also arranges places for outside musical groups to meet at field houses. 
Gives instruction to souse musical groups at Recreation Center building 
and provides ukuleles, am drums to one group. 

60 Junior Museum ; This Section consists of a Supervising Director 
(R58 or Code 3252), a Curator, two full-time Recreation Directors, and 
six part-time Recreation Directors. They operate the Josephine D. Randall 
Junior Museum on Corona Heights. An Auxiliary Committee also function* 
to foster public interest and promote development of the Museum. The 
Museum offers exhibits of a limited number of small animals and reptiles, 
and classes in arts and crafts, science, and nature studies. Conducted 
tours are held daily for school groups and others. The Junior Museum 
building has a theater at which motion pictures are shown and an audi- 
torium where about 16 clubs meet free of charge. Hot all the clubs are 
science groups. Facilities for model airplane building, woodworking, 
model railroad, end telescope making are available. 

7« Photography C enter: This Section consists of a Supervising 
Director - Photography~TR5B or Code 3258), one full-time Recreation 
Director and 11 exempt Recreation Directors, each specializing in a 
special field of Fnotography. Large and well furnished quarters are 
provided for developing, enlarging, and printing photographs, as well 
as a meeting room where seven Camera Clubs and groups meet free of charge. 
This is an exceptionally high-cost activity. There is a "Special 
Activities Committee" operating here who put on lectures, competitions, 
etc., and who charge a fee for admission, none of which accrues to this 
Department. 

8„ District "A" Recreation Units : This Section, under the direction 
of a Supervising Director and staff at 15 installations consisting of 16 
full-time Recreation Directors, 18 part- tine Recreation Directors and k 
Recreation Assistants, promotes and coordinates recreation programs and 
activities in approximately oncfturtii (15) of the Recreation Centers and 
playgrounds in the city. This includes supervising and training assigned 
personnel and study and preparation of reccaaaendations relative to recre- 
ational needs of the area. The Supervising Director represents the 
Department before civic and neighborhood groups within the area. 



52 



. ) PARK 



9„ District "B" Recreation Units ; This Section, under the super- 
vision of a District Supervising Director (R58 or Code 3288) and consisting 
of 27 full-time and 37 part-time recreation directors, directs, promotes, 
and coordinates recreation programs and activities for approximately one~ 
fourth (20) of the Recreation Centers and playgrounds in the city. This 
includes supervising and training assigned personnel, study and preparation 
and recomosndations relative to recreational needs of the area. The 
Supervising Director represents the Department before civic and neighbor- 
hood groups within the area. 

10. District "C" Recreation Units ; This Section, under the direction 
of a Supervising Director (R58 or Code 3288) and staff at 22 installations 
consisting of 17 full-time Recreation Directors, 21 pert-time Recreation 
Directors, and 12 Recreation Assistants, promotes and coordimt es recreation 
programs and activities for approximately one-fourth (18) of the Recreation 
Centers and playgrounds in the city. This includes supervisirg and train= 
ing assigned personnel, study and preparation of recommendations relative 

to recreational needs of the area. The Supervising Director represents 
the Department before civic and neighborhood groups. 

11. District "D" Recreation Units ; This Section, under the supervision 
of a district Supervising Director (R5B or Code 3288) and consisting of 

18 full-time and 30 part-time recreation directors, directs, promotes, and 
coordinates recreation programs and activities for approximately one- fourth 
(19) of the recreation centers and playgrounds in the city. This includes 
the supervising and training of assigned personnel, study and recommenda- 
tions relative to recreational needs of the area. The Supervising Director 
represents the department before civic and neighborhood groupe within the 
are&o 

12. Personnel ; One Supervising Director (R58 or Code 3280), handles 
the assignment of full-time, part-time and relief recreation directors to 
recreation units and assists in developing the recreation personal services 
(salaries and wages costs) required for the annual budget. This includes 
interviewing applicants and maintaining the Division a personnel records. 

13' Equipping and Furnishing Recreation Units ; One Supervising 
Director (R5& or Code 3290) performs duties in anxilyK^ng and pianaing 
needs of recreational activities insofar as furniture and equipment are 
concerned and making recommendations regarding requirements. This includes 
planning the equipping and furnishings of new and existing recreation 
centers and field houses, research on new types of equipment, checking 
and inspection of new materials and merchandise, expediting of delivery, 
and installation of equipment. 

1^. Regulation of Park Areas and Facilities s One Supervising Director 
(R58 or Code 3290) handles requests, reservations, assignments and regula- 
tions for the use of certain Recreation and Park Areas and facilities by 
special groups and organizations. This includes such responsibilities as 
supervision of day camping program, picnic areas, Wawona Clubhouse, Anglers 
lodge, Model Yacht Club, dog training areas, Horseman's Equitation Area, 
Sigmund Stern Grove clubhouse and facilities, contacts with other city- 
wide agencies using recreation facilities for camping prograua: and 
arrangements for lsuniclpal transportation for participants in city-wide 
specialized recreation programs. 

53 



i) PARK 



15. Tiny Tots an d Senior Citizen Activities ; ThiE section la under 
the supervision of a 'tecreation Director (R56 or Code 328*0 who prescribe*! 
the form of the programs, assigns program to various field houses and 
directs the playground personnel in the operation of the program. Also 
supervises the annual Senior Citizens Hobby Show at the Emporium. Main~ 
tains attendance records, a tiiae- consuming clerical function. 

16. Golf Course Activities, Balboa and Golden Gate Pa r k Stadiums 
and Colt Tower Operations ; This section under the supervision of an 
Assistant Director of Recreational Activities (R20 or Code 3223) who 
reports directly to the Superintendent of Recreation, consists of 12 
golf starters, seven janitors and one vendor. The Assistant Director 
of Recreational Activities is responsible for direct supervision of the 
golf course starters and janitors at the four municipal golf courses 
and the assignments, schedules, tournaments and rules and regulations 
pertaining to the courses. Ee is also responsible for special events 
and receipts at all paid events in the Balboa Stadium and Golden Gate 
Park Stadium and the operation of Colt Tower. 

Staffing 

The 163 full^tiae, 229 part=>time, and kl exempt employees are dis- 
tributed among the sections as shovn on the Present Organization Chart, 
Exhibit XXI. 



RECREATION AMD PARK 

Specific Recommendati ons 

Organization 

The organization of this Division should be revised as outlined 
in chart entitled Proposed Organization 4 , Exhibit XXII. 

Under the present arrangement one Assistant Superintends^ of 
Recreation and an Assistant Director of Recreational Activities .Golf) 
report directly to the? Superintendent of Recreation, In turn, the 
Assistant Superintendent has !*♦ key management-supervisory people and 
one Recreation Director reporting directly to him* 

The proposed re organization would result in the supervisors of 
special activities sections answering directly to the Superintendent , 
while the Assistant Superintendent would supervise and direct the field 
activities, including the operation of aquatic facilities, playgrounds, 
and golf courses „ 

This change should result in a better balanced distribution of 
supervisory responsibilities; furnish closer on~the-Job direction; and 
provide a more complete analysis of personnel woiic operations, methods, 
Individual performance, progress and attitudes « 

*-° Athletics t This section would be supervised by one Athletic 
Supervisor, TR105»Code 32?6) reporting directly to the Superintendent 
of Recreation. Under him would be 2 Supervising Recreation Leaders 
(R5&»Code 3290)* one for raen°s athletic activities and one for women's 
athletic activities, to whom the Athletic Supervisor would delegate 
responsibility to a proper extent, The Supervising Recreation Leaders 
would each have one Senior Recx*eatlon Leader (Code 3286) to assist them 
in their respective duties. 

2. Dramatics, Dancing and Music ; The present two sections would 
be combined into one section entitled dramatics, Dancing and Music. " 
This section would be supervised by a Dramatics and Dar.eing Supervisor 
(R106a Code 32H2) reporting directly to the Superintendent of Recreation. 
Under the Dramatics and Dancing Supervisor would be one Senior Recreatior 
Leader (R58 Code 3286 ) to whoa would be delegated responsibility to a 
proper extent. Bot e - The present Supervising Director (R58) in the 
Drama and Dance section is overclassified and this position should be 
reclassified as "Recreation Leader (R56 Code 328^). " The present 
Director of Music (R106c Code 3252) should be reclassified at a lower 
grade or eliminated ss the recommended elimination of high-cost 
"educational" and "nursery school" programs will considerably reduce 

the work load. 

3. Junior M usevm; This section would be supervised by a Senior 
Curator, Junior Museum (R118 Code 3550) reporting directly to the Super- 
intendent of Recreation. This position would combine the two present 
positions of Supervising Director (R58) and Curator (RX18). He would 
be responsible for all activities of the Junior Museum, delegating re- 
sponsibility to the Recreation Leaders (Code 328U) under him. 



55 



RECREATION AHD PARS 



^° Photography Center ? This section would be supervised by one 
Photography Director (R?8 Code 3258) reporting directly to the Superin- 
tendent of Recreation. He will have complete supervision over the Center, 
with one Photography Instructor (R56 Code 3256). 

5. Special Program and Results : This section would he supervised 
"by one Supervising Recreation Leader (R58 Code 3290) reporting directly 
to the Superintendent of Recreation, and who would supervise the follow-* 

ing programs: 

(a) Arte and crafts training. 

(b) Assigning and regulating use of Park Areas by special 
groups and organisations. 

(c) Day Camp Programs. 

(d) Assigning overnight camping areas and supervising their use. 

(e) Planning, equipping and furnishing new and existing in- 
stallations and associated responsibilities. 

(f ) Supervision of Senior Citizens and Tiny Tots activities. 

(g) Annual report and other interim reports. 

Under this Supervising Recreation Leader would be 2 Senior 
Recreation Leaders (new classification Code 3286) and 1 Recreation 
Leader (R?6 Code 3284) to whoa he would delegate the responsibility for 
the prograas enumerated above. The Recreation Leader (R56 Code 3284) 
should have assigned to him items (f) and (g) above and such other duties 
as the Supervising Recreation Director may assign. 

6, Aquatics : This section would be supervised by one Aquatics 
Supervisor (R106D Code 3216) reporting directly to the Recreation Assis- 
tant Superintendent. This is the same organization set-up as at present. 

7« D istrict Recreation Units, #1, #2 and #3 ? It is reconmended that 
the present four districts be combined into three districts to conform 
with Park Division Districts. 

By developing compatible districts and organizations in both 
the Recreation and Park Divisions (see Park Division recommeiida.\;ions), 
It will enable the district supervisors of both divisions to co-ordinate 
their efforts and to reconcile the programs and objectives of two some- 
what divergent schools of thought. 

Each district Recreation Unit would be supervised by a Recreation 
Area Supervisor (R58 Code 3288) reporting directly to the Assistant 
Superintendent of Recreation. Each will be responsible for the recreation 
activities in his area, and the proper functioning of the Recreation 
Leaders (R56 Code 3284) on the ground. 



56 






It is further recommended that those large recreation units 
requiring three or acre Recreation Leaders on duty at the sane time, 
be staffed with a Senior Recreation Leader (new classification Code 
3286) as one of the required staff. This person will have complete 
responsibility for the unit and will report directly to the Recreation 
Area Supervisor. At present there are Ik such units. The working 
supervisor at the installation level should reduce the amount of super- 
vision needed at the unit level. 

8. Golf Course Operation ; This section would he supervised by a 
Golf Course Operations Supervisor (R20 Code 3228) reporting directly 
to the Recreation Assistant Superintendent. The duties of this person 
will be the sacse as at present except that direction of Coit Tower 
should be transferred to the Business Division. Balboa Stadium and 
the old Golden Gate Park Stadium may remain under supervision of this 
section. 

(The above eight reorganization recommendations will result in 
a saving of $^1,000 per annum in personal services. ) 

9« Recreation Field Units Personnel ? (Recreation Leaders, etc. ) 
By revising schedu3.es at many units during Fall, Winter and Spring months, 
or 39 weeks of the year (excluding Summer vacation), a saving of h^S 
full-time director hours and 152 part«time director hours per week can 
be accomplished. This will equal an annual saving cf $66 ; OCO. 

Principally, these revisions involve rescheduling or discon<= 
tinuing programs now being conducted during morning hours. 

Supervisors Instruction Manual ~ Recitation 

Written procedures and Instructions as well as detailed job de» 
scriptions should be developed in the form of a manual for the supervisory 
personnel. 

Lack of written procedures for various jobs or operations has 
caused inconvenience, misinformation, nonuniform practices by employees, 
and costly guesswork on how to do the job. They would be of tremendous 
assistance in training supervisors or personnel when they are appointed 
to a new position. Many times the previous incumbent has left the 
department employment, retired, or transferred to another position and 
is unable to assist in the training. 

This division has prepared a "Recreation Directors Instruction 
Manual, "which Is of real assistance to the field forces. 

Supervisors Instructi on Manual ° Aquatics 

An instruction manual for the Aquatics Section personnel should be 
prepared. A manual similar to the "Recreation Director's Instruction 
Manual" should include all rules, regulations, and instructions about 
h andling various types of situations, policy information, reports, 



57 



Rotation of Personnel 

A plan should be developed for management personnel, such as 
Supervising Directors (R58 or Codes 3288 and 32 Q 0)> thereby they can 
be rotated between any of five positions. 

1. Supervising Director in Athletics Section. 

2. 3 Supervising Directors in Districts. 

3. Supervising Director in assigning and regulating use of 

Park Areas. 

This should; 

1. Strengthen tbe department, as more than one person will kr 
the details of the particular operation. 

2. Strengthen and broaden the individuals in the overall, 
departmental operation. 

3. Provide cross- training, which will develop a better 
understanding and co-ordination of all activities. 

k. Provide an incentive for individuals to improve themselves 
for future appointments. 

In-S ervice Trai ning Pro g ram 

The training program for the Division should includes 

1. Recreation leadership actually put into effact at a 
recreation unit or a playground under supervision of 
an experienced Recreation Leader, This would include 
observation of program leadership techniques by new 
trainee e&ployees. 

2. On=°the°groun&a training of new recreation leaders in 
recreation skills, department operation procedure 
safety practices before the individual is assigned to 
a recreation area. 

3. A thorough indoctrination regarding Park Division goals 
and cooperation between di visions. 

Such initial training should develop a stronger ±nd better versed 
employee, who will produce acre efficiently. In adcltion a public re- 
lations course should be developed for the new Senior Recreation Leaders - 






RECREATION AND PARK 



Supervisory Verification Mat 

A verification list for use by district supervising directors should 
be prepared. Such a list would include: 

1. Recreation leaders" responsibilities. 

2. Recreation leaders' objectives. 

3. Sequence of recreation unit operation. 
1*. Recreation unit programs. 

5. Attendance records at unit. 

6. Other records, which must be kept by the unit director. 
7« Supply requirements. 

8. Safety practices relative to hazards. 

9. Techniques. 

10. Work plan . 

11. Personnel rating chart aimed at performance improvement. 

12. List of failures, if any. 

13. Attitude and morale indications. 
Ik. Public relation activities. 

15. Condition of quarters and equipment. 

16. Any other items, as necessary. 

Each item should have a verification date assigned at logical in- 
^tervals. The management supervision would use this as a guide for making 
supervisory checks, at regular intervale, to determine the type of Job 
performance. In turn, the list should be reviewed by the Assistant 
Superintendent or the Superintendent. It can be an effective management 
tool. 

Attendance Records 

Reassign the '*3?iny Tots" attendance recording to the stenographic 
pool. At present, this record takes the time of a staff member. All 
other unit attendance records are maintained by personnel in the 
stenographic pool. 

Budget Suggestions 

Review items in budget, which have been deferred or deleted due to 
lack of funds on an organized scheduled quarterly basis to determine s 

1. Maintenance problems incurred. 

2. Further deterioration of equipment or buildings. 

3. Hecessity of curtailing services. 

Report serious conditions to the General Manager in order to assist 
in establishing project priorities for ensuing budget period. 



59 






Department and Recreation Division Publicity 

A programmed study should "be undertaken to evaluate the amount 
and type of departmental and Recreation Division publicity that is 
developed, prepared and distributed. A considerable amount of this 
written material should be discontinued. A saving in personnel time 
could be realized, as much time is spent by various supervisors in 
addition to the tiiae spent by the staff supervisor delegated to handle 
publicity releases, pamphlets, etc. 

Filing System 

Generally, each supervisor keeps a master file on each matter 
which he handles. It is recommended a thorough review of the files 
and filing methods be made in order to consolidate files and arrange 
a uniform, neat, and orderly method, and a central file. This should 
save considerable time of supervisory personnel doing filing and save 
time in locating filed material. 

In addition, a retention schedule should be developed for the 
orderly disposition of filed records. Such a plan would result in 
considerable saving of filing cabinet and file room space, and would 
assure destruction of obsolete records. 

Long and Short Term Plannl 



A recommendation was made to the Superintendent and Assistant 
Superintendent of Recreation to introduce a calendar booklet for long 
and short term planning. The Division readily accepted the suggestion 
and put the plan into effect with all management supervisors. 

The booklet is used to plan ahead by listing dates for racetingB, 
projects, start and completion dates for various programs ax.d .j.ivitiee 
affecting the individual and the entire division, follow-up dates for 
important verifications or checks to be made, etc. If utilized 
correctly, it presents a visual picture of each month °s plans,, which 
provides the supervisors a concrete organized method of planning their 
daily, weekly, monthly, quarterly, semi-annual and annual work. 



60 



TIOH A3D FARK 



Handling of Agreements and Reservations For Use of Special Recreational 
Facilities 

The following special facilities are handled "by one Supervising 
Recreation Leader (R58 Code 3290) s 

1. Dog Training Area 

2. Horseman "s Retreat (Bercut Equitation Ring) 

3. Casting Pools (Anglers " Lodge) 
k. Model Yacht Club 

5. Wavona Club House 

6. Sigmund Stern Grove Barbecue and Camping Area 

7. Camping Facilities and Grounds: 
20 Golden Gate Park locations 
Buena Vista Park 

(c) Balboa Park 

Pine Lake Park 

Silver Tree Camp (also Day Camp activities) 
(f ) McLaren Park (being developed) 



(c) 

ft! 



All requests for the use of these facilities are officially directed 
to the General Manager or the Superintendent of Recreation and are 
handled at one centralized location in the Recreation staff headquartere . 
Normally, clearance must be obtained from headquarters by any individual 
or group wishing to use these facilities. The same procedure is followed 
when a request is Eade to reserve a playground clubhouse, auditorium or 
meeting room. However, in these cases, the Recreation Area Supervisor 
involved investigates, clears, approves and notifies the individual or 
group involved. 

A fee of $5*00 is charged, or an amount sufficient to cover the 
expense of a Recreation Leader opening the clubhouse and regaining in 
attendance until the group is finished with their meeting or program. 
This also includes Slgmund Stern Club House reservations. The exceptions 
to a fee are as follows: 

Ko payment applies to any bona fide Community Chest agency, 
Public or Parochial schools, Church or Playground groups, 
P.T.A. or similar non-profit organizations. 

The fees and reservations are recorded hy a supervisor at the 
Recreation headquarters. Very little revenue is derived from this source. 

In addition, the supervisors in charge of the Junior Museum and the 
Recreation Arts buildings make reservations for public group meetings 
at these locations. Ho rental fees have been charged for these facilities. 

The reservations for meeting or conference rooms at the Lake Merced 
Sports Center are handled by a matron at the building, A definite 
schedule of fees has "been established and is being adhered to. 



61 



PARK 



Specific ReconwwEdr.-t'crc 

1. Handle all reservations for any facility under the jurisdic- 
tion of the Superintendent of Recreation in one location at Recreation 
headquarters. The request should be investigated, cleared, approved or 
refused and notification sent to the party making the request. All 
reservation records should he kept and fees collected at Recreation 
headquarters. Closer and more complete supervision should be given to 
this subject , 

Under the recommended reorganization plan, this operation need 
not be handled by the Supervising Recreation Leader exclusively. It 
could be assigned to one of the Senior Recreation Leaders assigned to 
him. At least three of the present staff should be trained in hov to 
handle this procedure. This should decrease the amount of clerical 
work done by the Supervising Recreation Leader and provide vacation 
and absence time coverage. 

2. Fees should be carefully reviewed and made comparable for all 
facilities. A definite fee schedule and method of procedure should be 
written, distributed to supervisors and followed closely. 



62 



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VI 

PARK DIVISION 

Page Ho. 

Function 64 

Organization 64 

Staffing 66 

Specific Recommendations 66 

Cut Flower Production (Balboa Park Bursery) 68 
Exhibits XXIII and XX2V 



o3 



PARK DIVISION 

Function 

The responsibilities of the Park Division are; 'i : he design, 
development, redevelopment, and maintenance of landscaped areas on 
properties under the jurisdiction of the Recreation and Park Depart- 
ment and other Departments on a transfer of funds basis; construction 
and maintenance of structures, buildings, roads, paths, courts, play- 
fields, and related equipment; construction, maintenance, and operation 
of irrigation and domestic water supply systems and water reclamation 
systems; operation and maintenance of nurseries and the Conservatory; 
design, construction, reconstruction, and maintenance of municipal 
golf courses; and development, operation, and maintenance of the Ball 
of Plovers and the Strubing Arboretum and Botanical Gardens , 

Organization 

The Park Division is under the direction of the Superintendent, 
Park Department. The Division is composed of ten sections as follows: 

1. Grounds : Responsible for horticultural development end main= 
tenance and custodial services in approximately 100 perks, squares, 
playgrounds, and assigned library branches, and the War Memorial Opera 
House in San Francisco and Camp Mather in Tuolumne County. Supervision 
of geographically dispersed units throughout San Frmcisco is provided 
by four Buildings and Grounds Supervisors. 

2. Maintenance : Responsible for horticultural development and 
maintenance and custodial services in Golden Gate Park and the Panhandle, 
San Francisco Zoological Gardens, Storyland, Great Highway and Ocean 
Beach, Sutro Heights Park, Mountain Lake Park, and Park Presidio 
Parkway; horticultural development and maintenance at the Horth Point 
Sewage Treatment Plant and provision of tree toppiEg, powered insecti° 
cide and weed control spraying, and rodent control services to other 
units in the Department. 

3- Conservatory ; Responsible for propagation, or transplanting, 
and maintenance of permanent specimens on display and the planning, 
propagation, and exhibition of temporary floral extibits in the Con» 
servatory in Golden Gate Park; and conducting group tours through 
the Conservatory. 

k. Nurseries ; Responsible for propagation and development of 
shrubs, trees, and other planting stock for locations under -he juris- 
diction of the Recreation and Park Department; maintenance of flowering 
shrubs periodically displayed in Union Square and other locations; 
and propagation, development, cutting, and deliver:' of floral arrange- 
ments for various City offices. 



6k 



■xIOH AND PARK 



5« Golf Course Maintenance .* Responsible for planning, construe- 
tion, reconstruction, and aaintenance of four municipal golf courses 
in San Francisco, and one course at Sharp Park in San Mateo County. 

6. Strutting Arboretum and Botanical Gardens, Eall of Flowers : 
Responsible for planting, development, maintenance, classification, 
and labeling of specimens in the Arboretum and Botanical Gardens; con- 
ducting group tours through the Arboretum and Botanical Gardens; and 
operation of the Hall of Flowers as a meeting place for garden and 
flower clubs, civic groups, commercial groups, and flower shows. (The 
Hall of Flowers was constructed with State funds and. a portion of 
annual operating costs are obtained from State funds on the basis that 
an annual flower show held in the fall months is, in effect, a County 
Fair.) 

7- Building Maintenance ; Responsible for inspection of buildingB 
and structures under jurisdiction of the Department to determine need 
for major reconstruction or maintenance work; prepares cost estimates 
for such work and a justification explanation for projects to be sub- 
mitted as part of the annual budget; preparation of specifications 
for purchase of building materials, supplies, and equipment; mainten- 
ance and repair work on buildings, structures, and equipment as pro- 
vided for in the annual budget for major projects, or as requisitioned 
by Department personnel for minor repairs; and the provision of watch- 
men for specific locations. 

8. Construction of Roads and Paths ; Responsible for the construc- 
tion, reconstruction, and maintenance of roads, paths, and paved areas 
on Recreation and Park properties, except major thoroughfares handled 
by the Department of Public Works; provision of equipment and operators 
for hauling of materials and cuttings, road or land grading, bulldozing, 
power moving of large grass or meadow areas, and hauling of garbage for 
locations not handled by scavenger service; operation of Land's End - 
Lincoln Park dump; and preparation of budget estimates and justifies" 
tions and purchasing specifications for automobiles . trucks, and other 
motorized equipment. 

9. Operating Engineer ; Responsible for operation of, or prescrib- 
ing operating procedures for, pumping, heating, ventilating, and re- 
frigerating equipment; operation of chlorinating, filtering, and puri- 
fication of water for swimming pool installations; preventative main- 
tenance programs for mechanical, electrical and auxiliary machinery 
and equipment; and preparation of budget estimates and justifications 
and purchasing specifications for equipment, supplies, installation, 

and repair of pumping, heating, ventilating, refrigerating, chlorinating, 
and filtering machinery and equipment. 



65 



,:j PARK 



10. Water Reclamatio n Pl ant-'Chemical and Bacteriological Analysis : 
Responsible for operation and maintenance of water reclamation plant in 
Golden Gate Park which supplies water to the Park s irrigation system; 
operation of Lloyd Lake and Elk Lake pumping stations and SOth and 
Lincoln sand trap; and performance of chemical analysis and bacteriolo- 
gical services for other Park Division units for plant control in lakes 
and ponds, control of boiler and swimming pool water, soil analysis, 
construction material testing, water quality control in lakes and 
reservoirs, and mosquito and gnat control. 

Staffing 

The 559 positions in this Division are distributed among the ten 
sections as shown on an organization chart included as Exhibit XXIII. 

Specific Recommendations 

Organization 

1. Reassign territory assignments of the current four Supervisors, 
Buildings and Grounds (proposed title: Area Supervisor: Parks, Squares, 
and Facilities) to eliminate overlapping geographic territories and 
reduce travel. Suggested assignments: 

a. U.S. Bureau of Census districts A, B and J. 
(See map included as Exhibit I.) 

b. U.S. Bureau of Census districts C, D, E, P, 0, 
H, 0, P, and Q. 

c. U.S. Bureau of Census districts K, L, M, N. 

Work with Recreation Division toward goal cf aaving territories 
of Area Supervisors: Parks, Squares, and Facilities coincide / . : those 
of the three Recreation Area Supervisors. This arrtngoment will reduce 
coordination problem which currently exists in having dissimilar 
geographic "territories. 

The suggested arrangement would permit reduction of one 
Supervisor of Buildings and Grounds position in the Park Division. 

2. Transfer labor crew working on construction and reconstruction 
of athletic fields to proposed Assistant Superintendent (Structural 
Maintenance and Services) as this unit provides various craft labor 
services to all Recreation and Park locations. 



66 



PARK 



3. Transfer supervision of Golden Gete Park Nursery and the 
Conservatory to the Supervisor, Maintenance (proposed title: Assistant 
Superintendent* Large Parks). The Nursery and the Conservatory are 
physically located in Golden Gate Park, the horticultural development 
and maintenance of which is assigned to the Supervisor, Maintenance. 

k. Transfer the tree topping, insecticide spray, and rodent con~ 
trol services presently under the Supervisor, Maintenance, to the 
Assistant Superintendent (Structural Maintenance and Services) for 
same reason outlined in paragraph "2". 



5. Transfer the activities under the present Supervisor of 
Construction, Roads and Paths; Chief Operating Engineer and Chemist, 
Sewage Treatment Plant to the Assistant Superintendent (Structural 
Maintenance and Services). Again, this organisational arrangement 
will put into one component the service activities i-elating to main« 
tenance and repair of all facilities within the Department. 

Institute a program for establishment of work nieasureHsnt standards 
for gardening and custodial activities. These activities are represented 
by approximately 375 positions in the Park Division and $2,750,000 in 
labor costs, including fringe benefits. Industrial applications of 
various work measurement techniques anticipate a mi-iimum savings of 
15$ in labor costs. Such a savings in this situation would equal 
$412,500 per year. 

Develop plans for new landscaping, or for replacement landscaping, 
to reduce continuing maintenance to a minimum. For example, the 
perimeter planting of several playgrounds includes cypress trees which 
are pruned and trimmed in a manner befitting a form*! garden. In other 
cases, areas are planted and replanted when the obvious traffic patterns 
preclude maintaining lawn or plant growth. 

Adopt the planning calendar for supervisory pluming recommended 
In the Recreation Division section of this report aod adoptee by that 
Division. This calendar should be useful in establishing and programming 
short= and long-range objectives, target completion dates, and follow 
up on personnel evaluations and other actions. 

Develop and use a check list or audit sheet for systematic and 
periodic (recommend semi-annual) inspection of facilities one. vo.:k 
performance at each installation under the jurisdiction of the Park 
Division. An excellent example is included in "Pars Kaintenejace" - a 
manual published by the State of California Recreation Commission. 



67 






Cut Flower Production (Balboa Park Hursery) 

This Operation provides cut flowers for numerous oity offices, 
and for special events such as receptions at City Hall, commemorative 
observances, dedications of public buildings, civic banquets, recrea- 
tional activities, etc. Flowers are delivered veekly uo% 

1. Mayor's office 

2. Supervisors ° office and meeting room 

3. Miscellaneous City Hall offices: 

Chief Administrative Officer, Civil Service Commisaion, 
Controller, Department of Public Works, Marriage License 
Bureau, Public Utilities, Sheriff and Undersheriff , re- 
tirement Board 
k. McLaren Lodge offices and Hall of Flowers 
5. Five members of the Recreation and Park Commi3sion. 

In Addition, during the concert season at Stern Grove, 100 to 
150 bunches of flowers are delivered for each of about 12 concerts. 
Also, when flowers are plentiful, the extra supply is given to 
nurses "quarters at the San Francisco General Hospital and to the 
Auxiliary of the Laguna Honda Home. Special events in i960 covered 
such things as a doll show at the Sharon Building, Lincoln memorial 
services at the City Ball, dedication of the Civic Center Garage, two 
receptions for President de Gaulle, reception for Mr. and Mrs. Avery 
Brundage at the City Hall, dedication of the Hall of Flowers, anc many 
others . 

The operation is staffed by a Foreman Gardener an £ four Garceners. 
Approximately 63-55» of this labor is chargeable to the cut flower opera= 
tion; the balance of 36.5$ being chargeable to the production of shrubs; 
the warehousing of fertiliser, grass seed and grain, for general 
Department requirements; and maintenance of grounds, applying the 
factor of .635 to the budget request for 1961-62 gives the following 
amountB chargeable to cut flowers: 

Personal services (including holidays and overbid) $ £&,86l 
Retirement and Federal Insurance Contributions Act Taxes 3,l6^ 

Total Labor $ 20,025 

Maintenance and Repair 2,kh0 

Utilities 650 

Materials and Supplies 2,600 

Total annual cost $""??. 715 



68 



AMD PARK 



On the basis that requirements for flovers for 1961-62 will be 
approximately the same as in 1960> the regularly scheduled deliveries 
plus special events will account for about 75$ of the flowers produced 
and delivered. The remaining 25$ represents excess production delivered 
to the hospitals. The total cost of production and delivery should be 
charged to the regularly scheduled deliveries, which issans that thic 
service will cost the city: 

For production of cut flowers $ 33,715 

For transportation and labor for placing and arretin g 2,550 

Total annual cost $ 36,265 

The Department has made estimates of the cost of a contracted 
service. Based on the i960 deliveries (excluding surplus to hospitals) 
the estimated contract cost is $12,765, roughly one- third of the cost 
of the city-grown flowers. (To this must be added about $2,700 to 
cover estimated contract cost for certain items provided by the Con- 
servatory, and for which no cost figures are available. This would 
bring the total estimated contract cost to about $15,500. Undoubtedly, 
the city cost figures above would be increased more than in proportion 
if cost 8 for the Conservatory items were included. ) 

This subject of cut flowers is brought into sharper focus because 
the present greenhouses and growing fields at Balboa Park will soon be 
taken over by the State Highway Department for a new freeway. Tentative 
plans call for a relocation of this activity at a new site in McLaren 
Park. A rough estimate made by the Department indicates that the cost 
of construction of greenhouses and auxiliary buildingt; at the new site 
would be approximately $170,000 This would cover the erection of 
greenhouses of considerably greater size than those now used at Balboa 
Park. 

S pecific Recommendation s 

1. In view of the apparent great discrepancy between the cost to 
the city of growing its own cut flowers and purchasing them on a contract 
basis, terminating this activity when the area now occupied in Balboa 
Park is taken by the State, is recommended. 

2. Further economies could undoubtedly be made by a positive 
reappraisal of the need for weekly delivery of flowers to citj ffices. 
It should be noted that on the estimated contract bas:".s, such deliveries 
would account for approximately $9? 000 per year, or a]>proxlmately 5&$ 
of the total estimated contract cost of about $15,500 per year. 



69 



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RECETA110H AND PARK 



VII 
ENGINEERING DIVISION 



Pa ge Mo. 

Function 

Staffing 72 

72 
Interim Transfer 



70 



KECREASXOK AHD PARK 



EttamKKimiG division 

Functio n 

The Engineering Division performs, or arranges for contract, 
professional engineering and architectural work for the Department. 
This includes: 

1. Collaborating on the establishment of engineering policies and 
programs in connection with construction, rehabilitation, and major 
maintenance projects to be Included in the annual budget. 

2. Assists in estimating costs for projects to be included in the 
budget, including engineering and architectural costs if project is to 
be contracted or performed by bond projects personnel. 

3. Prepares plans, designs, and construction drawings and specif i~ 
cations for projects approved and Included in the annual Appropriation 
Ordinance; arranges for such work to be performed by contract engineers 
and architects, when performance is by outside firms. 

k. Advertises for bids, analyzes bids after they are opened, and 
makes recommendations regarding award of contract. 

5. Determines that contractor to whom contract ie awarded has 
posted required performance bond and is properly insured after the 
Recreation and Park Commission has accepted bids and awarded contract, 
the contract has been approved by the City Attorney, and certified by 
the Controller. 

6. Inspects work performed by contractors, certifies progress and 
final payments, and arranges for contract modifications as may be neces- 
sary during construction. 

7. Makes topographic surveys as necessary for major project plan= 
nlng. 

8. Formulates basic landscaping plans for major projects including 
all aspects of the use of land and preparation of preliminary sketches 
of landscaping plans. 

9. Maintains ledgers accounting for Recreation ard Park bond fund 
encumbrances and expenditures. 

10. Processes contract payments to contractors, architects, engineers, 
and testing laboratories. 



71 



R3CR3ATI0N AND PARK 

Staffing 

The authorized staff for the Engineering Division was as follows: 

F-U30 Supervising Engineer 1 

F-4o6A Assistant Engineer II 3 

F-kCkA Assistant Engineer I 5 

F-401A Junior Engineer 3 

F-122 Senior Architectural Draftsman 1 

F-110 Landscape Architect 1 

F-610 Chief of Party (Survey) 1 

F-102A Draftsman 2 

B-6 Accountant II 1 

B-512 General Clerk-Typist 1 

B-2 Account Clerk 1 



Total 20 



Interim Transfer 



During the course of this study, in February, 1961, the Engineering 
Division was transferred to the Department of Public Works after the 
State Legislature ratified voter approval of this action in November, 
i960. Due to this transfer the Recreation and Park Task Fores dis- 
continued further consideration of the Engineering Division. 



72 



RECREATION .W) PARK 



VIII 
ZOO DIVISION 



73 



Page No. 



Function 7^ 

Staffing 1^ 

Attendance 7^ 

Concessions 75 

Specific Recosmend&tions 75 



RHCR3ATI0N AND PARK 



ZOO DIVISION 



Function 



The Zoo Division is responsible for the care and feeding of animals, 
maintenance of their health, and their display at the San Francisco 
Zoological Gardens (Fleishhacker Zoo), the Buffalo Paddock in Golden 
Gate Park, and the animal farm at Children's Playground which is also 
in Golden Gate Park. The Zoo Division is also responsible for animals 
included in special displays, such as the sheep in the Christmas scene 
arranged annually in a meadow area in Golden Gate Park. The Director 
of the Zoo makes recommendations relative to acquisition, disposition 
or exchange of animals and birds. 

Staffing 

Manpower in the Zoo Division consists of the following: 



1 


¥-212 


Director of Zoo 


1 


W-210 


Head Animal Keeper 


1 


W-208 


Assistant Head Animal Keeper 


28 


W-206 


Animal Keeper 


31 




Total 



The Park Division provides grounds and building maintenance and 
janitorial personnel for the Zoo, Fleishhacker Pool, Fleishhacker 
Playground, and Storyland, which are all in the same area. The 
personnel involved total 22. 

Attendance 

The annual attendance at the San Francisco Zoological Gardens has 
been estimated at 1,500,000. The attraction of this facility to 
tourists is evidenced by a sampling of visitors conducted by the San 
Francisco Zoological Society on several days throughout the cummer of 
1959- The results showed the following distribution of origin of 
visitors i 



San Francisco 


2% 


Bay Area other than 




San Francisco 


yrf> 


Balance of California 


25* 


Balance of U. S. 


12* 


Foreign 


1% 


Total 


1o5fe 



7^ 



RECREATION aND PARK 



Concessions 

The San Francisco Zoological Society has concessions for rides at 
Fleishhacker Playfield and audio devices, gift shop, cafeteria, food 
"booths, and seal feeding at the Zoo. San Francisco Zoo Tours, Inc. 
has the concession for sightseeing tours of the Zoo. In addition to a 
concession fee, the surplus of receipts over expenses for the San 
Francisco Zoological Society are used to purchase equipment for main- 
tenance of the Zoo end for donations to the city for capital improve- 
ments or purchase and exchange of animals. 

Specific Recommendations 

Refer to recommendation on fees and admission charges in another 
section of this report. 



75 



RECRE- 



DC 



ADMISSIONS AND FEES 



*33£. 

General 77 

Specific Recommendations 78 

Summary of Detailed Reports 80 

Tiny Tots Program 81 

Sanior Citizens Program 81 

Summer Day Camp Program 82 

Photography 8U 

Drama and Dance 87 

Music 88 

Junior Museum 89 

Swimming - Aquatics 93. 

Industrial Athletic Division 93 

Softball Association 95 

Golden Gate Park Tennis Courts 9& 

Camp Mather 97 

Coit Tower 98 

Golf Courses 98 

Stadiums and Kezar Pavilion 101 

Model Yacht Club 108 

Angler's lodge 103 



Page 

So F Zoological Gardens 103 

Storyland 105 

Rifle Range at Sharp Park 106 

Archery Range at " " 107 

Beach Chalet 107 

Yacht Harbor Rentals 107 
Exhibits XXV and XXVI 



76 



RECKED PARK 



AUnLiliiOu AM) F EES FOR RECPEAT IQK ACTIVITIES AND FACILITIES 

General 

Self-support through fees and charges in recreation is now an 
established and publicly accepted fact. Since local government is 
often competing with private recreation agencies, the public mini is 
partially geared to a fee system for public recreation,, It is the 
present and future obligation of the people in this profession to be 
certain that the monies obtained in this manner are Justified, equit- 
able, levied on a sound basis and wisely used. Activities for children 
should be free of unnecessary charge, while adult programs should be 
self-supporting. This was the general concensus of a Committee assigned 
to this subject at the 12th annual California and Pacific Southwest 
Recreation Conference held at San Jose in February I960, 

NOTE: The Committee membership was composed of the following: 
South Gate Director of Parks and Recreation, Chairman; 
Oakland Superintendent of Recreation; Chula Vista Director 
of Recreation; Santa Fe Springs Recreation Supervisor; and 
Huntington Itark Director of Recreation . 

This committee held the opinion that financial responsibility for 
facilities and programs designated as indispensable or essential should 
be provided by the agency, while those evaluated as desirable should be 
self-supporting. Their feeling was — "It is the responsibility of the 
community to provide the bread — the butter and Jelly must come from 
those who eat" 

An opinion, generally accepted by the Committee was that fees 
should not deter participation of underprivileged individuals or groups,. 
Scholarships or booster organisations can be a means of providing for 
those who cannot pay„ 

The concensus of many in the recreation field is that laoniea 
derived free feea and charges should not become a part of a central or 
general fund, but should be ear-Earked in some fashion by the Controller 
so as to be used to supplement inadequacies of capital assets or to 
preside for participation of under-privileged. This is recommended in 
Section I of this report. 

Specific changes should relate to specific costs determined by 
sound and business-like methods. The recreation profession must accept 
this fact if it is to survive and improve its status. As budgets rise, 
so also does the affioaat of public scrutiny. Recreation is a business 
and s&st accept the responsibility of adequate Justification. Mora and 
sore thought and positive action must be given by recreation management 
toward fees and charges to supplement established income from ad-valorem 
taxes. A definite written policy end plan, established on a concrete 
basis, is an absolute necessity. 



77 



RECREATION AMD PARK 



Specific Recommendations 

1. The following principles should he observed in establishing a 
schedule of admissions and fees:- 

(a) Financial support should he provided by those participating 
in high-unit cost programs » 

(h) Financial support should he provided by those participating 
in programs requiring specialized leadership or individual or 
small group instruction. 

(c) The ad valorem taxpayer should, in general, support only pro- 
grams with mass appeal requiring little or no specialized 
leadership, no individual or small group instruction, and 
those with low unit costs „ 

(d) Adult programs should be established only when adult partic- 
ipants are willing to fully defray the costo 

(e) Non-residents of San Francisco should support proportionately 
those mass appeal activit5.es which attract a substantial 
attendance from that group. 

2. The objectives to be sought are: 

(a) To 3et charges no higher than necessary to recover out-of- 
pocket costs 6 

(b) To generally provide services and programs free to children 
under 12 or lU years of age. 

(c) To deter undesirable use of recreation facilities. 

(d) To regulate and control use of facilities, equipment, and 
supplies. 

3. A definite written policy and schedule of admissions and fees is an 
absolute necessity to accomplish the desired resu3.t. 

The Seanary whieh follows auraasrizes the operations which are the sub- 
ject of detailed reports included in this Section and includes all 
revenue generated by the Recreation and Park Department. 3o capital 
costa hare been included in the SusEary tabulation nor in the detailed 
report 3 o Also, costa do not include payroll fringe benefit costs, 
eatisated to total $100,000 nor overhead expenses of heat, light, 
water, etc. Specific recoa»endations pertaining to each activity are 
also inclined in the detailed reports. 



73 



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80 






lo — Tiny Tots Frograra 

The "Tiny Tots" program represents an extension of the public 
schools kindergarten classes to children from 3 years to k yearc 9 
months of age, an age vhen the child should be in the home. This 
activity closely resembles a nursery school,, There is considerable 
feeling even within the Department that 2 years 9 months of kinder- 
garten results in a restless and hard to contx*ol child during the 
kindergarten year in the public schools. 

This program costs the Department $26,823 annually, or $15«91 per 
child, a very high cost. It operates 39 weeks per year, being sus- 
pended during the school vacation periodo It requires the attention 
of k6 playground directors for a minimum of 2-1/2 hours for each class 
during morning hours when the clubhouse would otherwise be closed* As 
a result these full-time directors are able to complete ^0 hours in 5 
days, whereas otherwise it would require 6 days This fact may have 
influenced the decision to institute this program some 7 years ago. 

There are 80 groups meeting once a week with 5 more projected, the 
total attendance being 1,686, or about 8$, of approximately 20,500 
children of this age group in San Francisco,, 

This is not a true "recreation" program but is more nearly an 
educational program, designed to teach the pre-school age child over a 
year and nine months substantially the things which the child will be 
taught in kindergarten in one year,, We hear throughout the field that 
its real result is to allow the parent free time to "visit the reighbor 
over a cup of coffee" or "to go shopping",. 

Specific Recommendations 

(a) These classes should be moved to an afternoon period which will, 
remove the necessity of morning supervision,, 

(b) Because of its high cost and lack of pure recreation character thif: 
program should be eelf -supporting,, Eased on an attendance of 20 
children per class in each of 8l classes, the fee schedule would 
be $8,00 per semester, $16.00 per year for each child,, A cecrease 
in attendance would not decrease the cost of the program as the 
expense is entirely supervi3or^o This would necessitate an upward 
revision of the fee schedule <, Otherwise the program should, be 
discontinued, 

2. — Senior Citizens Program 

Social recreation indoor areas and programs are provided for some 
15 groups of Senior Citizens composed of approximately 380 of the esti- 
mated 1^0,000 population in this age group (60 years and over). The 
programs include such activities as hobby arts and crafts^ music, teble 
games (cards, chess, checkers, etc.), folk and square dancing, luncheon., 
teas, dinners, conversation, and informal visiting. 



81 



RECREATION AND PARK 



Thirteen recreation directors at recreation units plus one director 
on the headquarters ' staff spend a total of approximately 3^- hours per 
week, or an estimated 1,767 hours for 39 weeks at a nine months depart- 
mental expense $k ? 6f6 o 00 o This expanse is $12,, 5° P©*" participant for a 
nine months' period or approximately $1.^0 per month,. 

Only 25$ to 30$ of a Senior group's activity time is supervised by 
a recreation director,. Each group does a considerable amount of their 
own planning and work. Most groups indicate this is the way they wish 
it to be, as they prefer to be as self-sufficient as possible* No 
recreation director assistance 1b given to the group meeting at the 
Yerba Buena Senior Citizens Building or to the men who meet daily at 
Funston and Rolph Playgrounds,, 

An annual Senior Citizens Hobby Show is conducted at the Emporium 
under the Sponsorship of the Chamber of Commerce, Labor Council, 
Emporium, Adult Education Division of the School District and others. 
Recreation and Park provides supervision by a Recreation Director, pro- 
grams, ornate certificates of participation, ribbons for prizes, badges, 
etc A Recreation Director spends considerable time In receiving and 
returning exhibits preceding and following the show, '["here were 207 
exhibitors In I960 and an attendance of 5,225. Only a7>out 10 to 15 per 
cent were connected with Recreation and Park programs at recreation 
centers, the remainder coming mainly from about 30 otherwise sponsored 
groups, kj were not affiliated with any group. 

Specific Recommendations ; 

(a) As most of these folks are pensioners with limited income and they 
generally wish to handle their own activities and programs, no 
change or charge is recommended* It is further suggested that any 
of these groups be allowed to use available rooms or recreation 
buildings during day or evening hours when the facilities are 
normally covered by recreation personnel, A minlnura amount of 
director supervision should be provided, as most of these folks 
seem to prefer to program their own activities ami time. They like 
to have their own responsibility to do for themselves rather thai: 
be pressed into specified programs „ The Recreation Division's 
approach should be one of cooperation rather than supervision. 

(b) The Senior Citizens Hobby Show should be fully supported > vr the 
sponsoring groups and the clubs in which 85 to 9C4 of the partic- 
lpants hold membership. 

3° Summer Day Camp os 

Th© attendance at the i960 Summer Day Camp Program was as follows? 

Ho. of Ho. of Youngsters Total 
Camp A fle Groan Weeks Per Week (5 B ays) Toungstei-s 

Silver Tree 7 to 12 11 1B5 2 *°35 
Pine Lake 11 to 13 9 V? ^5 

Grand Total 2,1*0 

82 



8 


5 


1*0 


9 


20 


180 


2 


20 


to 



RECREATION AMD PARK 



The Municipal Railway provides round trip transportation from 
designated recreation areas and school yards,, In addition the follow- 
ing attended from other groups s 

*Total 
Outside Group Ho, of Weeks No„ Per Week Youngsters 

Aid to Retarded Children 

Child Care Centers 

St Joseph Academy 

* Included in Grand Total Above „ 

These camp3 are operated five days each week during the school 
summer vacation and provide a wholesome opportunity for outdoor living,. 
Each child attends for one week only The supervised program includes 
camp crafty nature lore, hiking, music, general crafts^ camp fire pro- 
grams, tours and f5„eld trips Each child is furnished a noonday meal,, 

The expenditures of $lit-,5Tf in i960 cover the wages of 11 full- 
time and 8.5 part-time personnel during the season, as veil as trans- 
portation, food and materials. Payment of $2*00 per week for each child 
produced a total revenue of $k,800 in 1960 o Thus the net coat to the 
department was $9 -,777 or $4 „ 00 per child „ 

Mo immediate expansion is contemplated except possible increased 
attendance when the new Silver Tree Camp building is completed in the 
Summer of 196l« This year it is planned to operate Pine Lake Camp as 
in the past,, Increased attendance will depend upon availability of 
personnel,, 

Specific Recommendations 

Increase the fee to at least $k„00 per week per child, or B0£ a 
day„ At present cost figures this would cover approxiraately two-thirds 
of the expense,, The City and County would still be subsidising one- 
third of the cost,, 

This is anothar case where parents should pay for the service 
rendered* 

The expense factor in this program seems to be all important „ It 
is evident that this program could expand in the next five years if 
satisfactory financing could be arranged „ 



83 



RECREATION AND PARK 

h. — Photography 

The Photography Center Is an example of a high cost, proportion- 
ately low attendance activity producing relatively little income It 
is housed in about 7,800 sq. ft. of the Recreation Arts Building at 
50 Scott Street and is equipped with a huge dark room, 30 Omega 
enlargers, 6 contact printers, paper cutters and developing trays, a 
print room equipped with the latest type rotary print washers and dryers, 
a negative developing room, a studio equipped with the latest lighting 
equipment, locker rooms, library and large meeting room for lectures 
and club meetings. Use of the equipment is limited to those who have 
taken out memberships in the Center. The membership fee is nominal and 
the impression is conveyed that it is designed to insure continued 
attendance and perhaps weed out undesirables. 

A staff of 13 operate the Center: 1 Supervising Director, 1 
Recreation Director full-time, and 11 Recreation Directors all part- 
time, exempt. Also two-thirds of a .janitor's time is required. 

The following Camera Clubs use the Center for their meetings at no 
cost. 

Northern California Council of Camera Clubs com- 
posed of delegates from 21 clubs in the Bay Area 1 per month 
California Camers Club k 
Sunset Camera Club k 
Photochrome Club of San Francisco 2 
Thursday Night Camera Club 2 
Westwood Movie Club 1 
Special Activities Committee: 
consists of representatives of various clubs 
and Center members 2 " 

The Special Activities Committee provides special programs for 
which they make a charge. These consist of lectures (illustrated) on 
various facets of photography. 

These meetings and programs attract an appreciable number from the 
surrounding Bay Area. 

The staff gives frequent short "quickie courses" on various rather 
basic principles of photography, beamed at beginners, who are encouraged 
to become members of one of the clubs who meet at the Center. Ho charge 
is made for these courses. 

The i960 annual report of the Recreation and Park department con- 
cerning the Photography Division is misleading. In one paragraph it 
says that "During the year *6,T30 people made use of the Ph^t -phy 
Center's facilities" and in the next paragraph "the toial activs member- 
ship for the year was 1,508". 

Actually, as of March 30, 1961 the membership was as follows: 



m 



RECREATION AND PARK 

676 holding currently valid membership cards . 

l8l memberships paid for but cards not yet picked up. 

857 Total paid up members. 

As no delinquencies are collected, this is the actual number of 
persons entitled to use the facilities and are the only one6 currently 
providing financial support to the center. They represent Just over o l# 
of the population. 

I» addition they carry in the live membership file: 

553 who vere delinquent up to 6 months. If any should renev their 
membership (and some will) no charge will be made for the period 
of delinquency and 
1,25^ who are delinquent from 6 months to 1 year, none of whom will be 
charged for the delinquency period, should they renew. 

Of the l8l cards not picked up (indicating that the person has not 
visited the Center since taking out membership) k9 are annual memberships 
and by far the most of the remainder are 3 months memberships. 

Of these cards 29 will expire in April (1 month) 
3^ " " " May (2 months) 
h6 " " " June (3 months) 

6 " " " August to December (5 months) 
k6 " " " January to March 1962 

(9 mos. to 1 year) 

The i960 annual report also states that since the opening of the 
facility in fiscal 1958 they "have had a total membership of 4,500". 
Here again is an overstatement, for this is the number of cash receipts 
issued. Thus, a person maintaining membership and paying qucr'rsrly 
would be counted about 12 times in this figure. 

The annual cost of operating this activity is $35*195 for salaries 
and materials alone „ The only income is from locker rental and dues of 
Center members, which in i960 fiscal year was $5,878, leaving a deficit 
of $29,317* For fiscal 1961 the deficit is estimated to be $28,900. 
This is an annual cost of $33=70 per person. No attempt has been made 
to increase revenue, notwithstanding the fact that the programs presented 
by the Special Activities Committee, for which a charge of $^.00 or $5.00 
is made, attract substantially greater attendance than the free courses. 

The money derived from activities of the Special Activities Com- 
mittee is said to be about $2,500 per annum and is retained by them for 
the purpose of defraying lecturers' fees and prizes 1 the remainder is 
used to buy articles for the Center, which the Supervising Director 
believes would be very difficult to get through regular budgetary pro- 
cedures . 



85 



HECHE •' PARK 



The objective of the Photographic Center is said to be to encourage 
a greater use of this activity as a "full-tine hobby" instead of an 
occasional pastime. This would of course increase the cost of materials 
to the individual,, 

Photography is a recreational avocation requiring a comparatively 
substantial investment in equipment and a constant expense for materials, 
and is therefore to a very great extent an activity of those at least in 
moderately good income status. Attracting Just over 0,1# of the 
population, it must be classed as being in the category of merely 
desirable but by no means essential for the health and welfare of the 
community. As a matter of fact, San Francisco's installation is the 
only one of its kird in the country, although several cities are 
exploring the desirability of installing some form of photography center. 

Specific Recommendations 

(a) The Center should produce income as near as possible to offsetting 
the expense of wages and materials. It is of such high cost that 
charges for repair and maintenance of equipment cannot be covered 
by dues. The following table sets forth the present and recommended 
fee schedule: - 

Present Present 

Annual Recommended Estimated 
Annual Rate Income Rate Income 
Membership in Center - Adult $6" ) $30 ) 

) $*,896 ) $23,268 
Under 19 $2 ) $12 

Rental of Lockers $k to 12 892 $8 to 2k 1,78k 

Rental of meeting room, 

including meetings of 

Special Activities Comm. none - $20 U,320 

Lecture courses (quickie) 

given by Center personnel none - $1 per lecture 1,600 



TOTAL $5.873. $30,972 , 

DEFICIT $29,317 $ *,223 

(b) In the event of any future increase in costs these recomEer.aed rates 
should be adjusted accordingly. 

(c) If those using this facility do not wish to cover the costs the pro- 
gran should be discontinued. 



66 



RECREATION AKO PARK 

5. — , Drama and Dance (Except Story land) 

This section occupies approximately two-thirds of the Recreational 
Arts Building which was created In 1958 at a cost of $1*50,000. The 
section uses practically the entire main floor and second floors. The 
second floor is used principally for the storage of the costumes and 
properties . 

This section conducts or supervises many varied activities both on 
recreation units and elsewhere „ The activities held on recreation units 
consist of Storytelling, Puppetry, Adult and Junior Drama, Mult and 
Junior Folk Dance, Doll Shovs and many others . The civic activities 
participated in are Columbus Day, Pacific Festival, Bay Area Folk 
Festival, etc. 

It also maintains about 15,600 costumes and 1,800 properties used 
in the above activities and others vhere the division acts in a con- 
sultative capacity o 

The annual cost of this section (exclusive of story land) is 
$5 *389 for personal services and $3,000 for materials. No revenue is 
generated by this Section directly. This is a cost of $5.5° for each 
of the 9,679 persons involved. This Is chiefly a supervisory activity, 
the programs being performed for the most part away from the Recreational 
Arts Building at 50 Scott Street, 

The Staff consists of: 1 Supervisor of Dramatics and Dancing 

1 Supervising Director 

1 Seamstress 

1 Laundress 

8 Recreation Directors, part-time, 7 exempt 

Specific Recommendations 

(a) Drama and dance activities servicing adult groups should be self«» 
supporting. 

(b) As stated above this section maintains 15,675 costumes and 1,779 
stage properties for use throughout recreation installations. 
Their i960 report shows 

Costumes used 11,096 

New costumes 885 

Costumes remodeled 5°8 

Costumes altered 671 

This Is an expensive operation which should not be undertaken. It 
la proper that parents should provide costumes for their own 
children., and adults should of course provide their own. 

(c) A realistic survey of this Section should be made to determine 
actually how many persons axe attracted to these programs. Stated 
attendance of 367,000 is arrived at as follows: 

87 



HECK3ATI0B AMD PARK 



An adult drama group multiplied by 15 members multiplied by $k 
meetings equals 810 "units of service" or "attendance units " In 
the annual reports however this 810 figure is spoken of as "persons 
attending" whsreas actually only 15 persons were involved,. Further- 
more when music is also used, the same persons will be counted in 
reports of that Section if the activity is held in a Recreation 
fieldhouse, they will be counted a third tirae Also a child 
attending several programs will be counted for each one, all of 
which makes "attendance" records meaningless so far as individual 
persons are concerned. 

(d) The Recreation and Park Department subsidized the adult folk dance 
festival at the Auditorium by contributing $6?5 to defray the 
rental. This should be discontinued as an adult program it should 
pay its own way. 

6. «■- Music 

This section occupies small quarters in the Recreation P:<rts Build- 
ing at 50 Scott Street „ It also uses the club room for group singing 
and some music instruction. 

Music is provided for many activities held on Recreation sites and 
for various civic celebrations such as Columbus Day, building dedications, 
May Day, Stavn Grove Carnival, etc., for which no revenue is received., 
Some activities are held at the Center or supervised from there, as 
follows: 

(a) Recreation Symphony - a group founded by Mrs. Sigmund Stern who 
practice weekly at the Center and give free recitals. 

(b) Adult Dance Band - an amateur "pop" music group of 20 member a who 
meet weekly at Borth Beach playground and play for their own 
pleasure o Music Section furnishes chairs, music stands and some° 
times music, but no supervision. 

(c) Golden Gate Band - Another adult group of 28 members but composed 
mostly of Senior Citizens who meet weekly for 39 weeks a yesr at 
Eureka Valley Playground. 

(d) Adult Chorus - This group of 25 members meets weekly at the Center 
and are instructed by the Director of music. They sirg at Special 
Programs sponsored by the Recreation Division. 

(e) Senior Citizens Coaiunity Singing - now inoperative due to lack of 
interest. 

(f ) San Francisco Boys Chorus - This group of 81 members met 84 times 
during the fiscal year 1959-60. They meet at Recreation Arts 
Building and have their own instructor. They sing in the Opera 
chorus. 



88 



RECREATION AHD PARK 



(g) Buchner Light Orchestra - This is a group of 15 adults who meet 

weekly at Recreation Arts Building chiefly to read music for their 
own pleasure,, Mr. Buchner owns a music store and formerly rented 
a hall, hut now gets free quarters,, 

(h) Glen Park Drum Corps - This is a Junior activity, held at Glen 
Park. Music Section provides the drums and the Director gives 
instructions* 

The f*?usic Section also assists in some degree various civic and 
private groups in planning and programming their events 

The Music Section states that the attendance at the above listed 
activities was 17,796. The number of participants was 25k. 

The staff consists of: 1 Supervisor of Music, 

5 Recreation Directors, part-time, two 
of which are exempt classification 
22 pianists, part-time . 

The total wage cost is $31,1580 The over-all service covers 
approximately 2,535 participants at a cost of $12.29 per participant „ 

Specifi c Recommendations 

(a) There dees not appear to be any revenue possibilities present in 
the activities occurring at the Center with the exception of the 
Buchner Light Orchestra. Without question this organization 
should be required to pay for the use of the quarters, as they 
were accustomed to do prior to the opening of the Center. It is 
rscciHBended that the fee be fixed at $15.00 per meeting. 

(b) The specialized steal! group activities should be discontinued, or 
booster elub sponsorship obtained. Example - Glen Perk Drum 
Corps - There are many drum corps affiliated with clubs and 
fraternities. This group should be so sponsored and equipped. 

7. — • Junior Meseua 

This installation, as its uaiss implies, is designed to appeal to 
young children and presents a variety of begiaasrs classes in natural 
science, arts and crafts, and is rather heavily used by the schools for 
conducted tours. It is open six days (including evenings) aach week and 
on Sundays from 11;00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. for conducted tours. 

In October 1959 a study eomsittee on the purpose, policies and 
operation of the Junior Meseua recosasndad that the Junior Museum should 
"present a variety of stimulating opportunities supplemental to the 
school classroom" and also that it "should not duplicate activities of 
schools and other Institutions", 



89 



RECREATION AND PARK 



The Junior Museum is housed in a new building on Corona Heights, 
which cost approxitiately $390,000 and the annual operating costs are 
$^3»738 far personal services and approximately $3,000 for materials 
and supplies including animal food. 

The staff consists of: 1 Supervising Director 

1 Curator 

7 Recreation Directors (5 part-time) 
1 Janitor 

While no accurate figures are available for the number of persons 
regularly participating in the programs at this installation ( "attend- 
ance units" for 1959-60 stated as 72,372), personnel at the Junior 
Museum estimate the number of participants to be about 700. This is a 
per person annual cost of over $51, which is one of the highest unit 
cost activities in the Recreation Division, 

S pecific Recommendations : 

(a) No charge should be made for daytime activities vhich are partic- 

p ted in i ':■ ost entirely by ju^io^a, but a determined effort 
should be made to reduce the rjteff expense by volunteer super- 
visors drawn from interested science groups, 

(b) The many groups meeting here in the evenings should pay the cost 
of providing evening supervision. The proportion of the salary 
cost applicable to the evening hours is $2,165 per annum and a 
charge of $8,00 per meeting vill cover this expense, as indicated 
by the figures below: 

Name of Group Number of ?feetings Annual Co st 

S.F. Gem & Mineral Society 1 per month $96,00 

California Alpine Club 1 per month 72,00 

(9 months only) 

S,F. Horseless Carriage Club 1 per month 96,00 

S.F, Sports Car Club 1 per month 96. 00 

S.F. Vultures 1 per week U16.OO 

Mycological Society 1 per month 96,00 

Alpineers Club 1 per month 96,00 

S.F, Archers 1 per month 96. 00 

Golden Gate Marine Aquarium Society 1 per month 96. 00 

Audobon Society 1 bi-monthly W3„00 

Sierra Club-Natural History Section 1 bi-monthly Ij8,00 

Sport Car Club of America 1 bi-monthly fc8.00 

Shetland Sheep Dog Club 1 per month 96.OO 

S.F, Amateur Astronomers 1 per month 960 00 

" " " (telescope making., meet 5 days each 
week. Charge based on 8k evenings 
on which no other activity is 

scheduled) 672,00 

£2,168,00 



90 



HECREATIOB AHD PARK 



(c) A model railroad is in process of building in a large "basement and 
a charge should also be ttade for this apace „ 

8, »■ Swimming - Aquatics ; 

During the fiscal year 1959-1960 the attendance of the 12 aquatic 
units was as follows: 





School 


Children's 


Adult's 


Scrip 


Indoor Pools 


Classes* 


Admissions 


Admissions 


Tickets 


Balboa Pool 


30,34* 


61,1*78 


4,295 


48 


Garfield Pool 


27,393 


68,0l»8 


4,163 


Uk 


Hamilton Pool 


26,8*7 


21,887 


1,761 


22 


McLaren Pool 


1,539 


47,131 


1,656 


29 


Larson Pool 


9,698 


98,970 


9,679 


80 


North Beach Pool 


25,643 


38,482 


lf,806 


1U6 


Rossi Pool 


42,316 


.2L2S2L 


4,987 


110 




163,780 


393,919 


31,347 


479 


Outdoor Pools 











Herbert Fleishhacker 

Pool (k moBo)** 
Mission Pool (5 mos. )» » 2»586 



26,748 

i§a60E 



166,366 439,276 



7,718 



39,065 



30 
509 



Beach Locations 

Aquatic Park ** 

Lake Merced Sports Center 

Phelan Beach 



Estimated Attendance Units* ^-* 

88*, 329 
l62,*20 

421,653 



* School classes are made up of approximately 10,150 Senior-high 
youngsters who take lessons in their physical education classes 
for 4 to 5 weeks, 

*» During 1959-60 period, due to the lack of sufficient part-ticse 
funds, it was necessary to close Mission Pool one month earlier 
and to operate Fleishhacker Fool for four months instead of the 
usual seven months,, Also Aquatic Park was without lifeguard 
service for four months except for Saturdays and Sundays » 

*** Count is made three times a day at each location, combined to 
make up "units,, " 



91 



RECBFATICB AHD PARK 



The instruction periods were increased to 25 classes at each pool 
However, for a short period all classes were discontinued due to lack 
of "part-time" funds <> In addition to the Senior High School classes, 
which are handled by school physical-education instructors, the Aquatics 
division serviced groups including pre-school. Junior High School, and 
adult citizens. Also using the facilities were groups from churches, 
Langley Porter Clinic, Cerebral Palsy, United Community Fund Agencies, 
playgrou^^ > policemen, fireisen,. servicemen, airline and nursing groups, 
businessman "a clnbs and irSuBtriaJL groups. R»d Cross Life Saving pro- 
gress were crcphr-si^ed during summer vacation mox-nlngs, and synchronized 
swim groups greatly increased during the year. 

Hew activities Included national Boat Week, SCUBA classes, and 
nine swim teams handled by Recreation & Park swimming instructors. 
Small craft instruction was given at Take Merced to Boy and Girl Scouts, 
Camp Fire Girls and Coast Guard, 

Rates for public swimming in afternoons and evenings at the nine 
pools are as follows: 

Scrip Tickets - $5«00 - 15 swims, good at any pool, indoor and 
outdoor. 

Rates 

Herbert Fleishhacker 10^ children, 5°^ adults 
Mission Pool 5^ children 

Indoor Pools IOJI children, during the day 

25^ children, evening 
50^ adults at all times 

15^ suit and towel 

The total revenue from swimming and rental of swim suits and towels 
for adults and children was $89,3^3.90 for the 1959-60 fiscal year The 
estimated r=-vsnue fcr ■'960-61 is *£9,720 T *hich includes: $59,000 from 
pools ana additional reveirae which will be realised ty the Aquatics 
Section from the Fleishhacker Bath House (estimated $9*700) and the 
Lake Merced Aquatic Sports Center meeting room rentals (estimated 
$1,020). Based on this income and the I96O-6I budgeted wage expendi- 
tures of approximately $315j^60> this operation will develop an esti- 
mated deficit of $215, 7^. 

The personnel carrying on this program is as follows? 

Title 

Supervisor of Aquatics (R 106) 
Head Life Guard (R 108) 
Swimming Instructors (R 11*0 
Life Guards (R 110) 
Lifeguard Watchman (R 111) 
Matrons (R 112) 
Lockerroom Aides (R 52) 



92 



Full Time 


Part Time 


1 


. 


1 


. 


9 


23 


7 


37 


2 


• 


16 


lU 


• 


3V 


3* 


15?: 



KCUtt&ATJUJH AKU .PAjKK. 



An additional list of approximately 50 people are available for 
"on call" basis, if and when heavy attendance is experienced. They are 
assigned on a part-time basis at any location requiring assistance. 

The normal coverage at a pool includes one Swimming Instructor, 
one Life Guard and two Matrons. One standard of the supervision 
assigned is "one life guard for each 75 swimmers." Where the weather 
is warm and attendance heavy, only 225 youngsters to be in a pool at 
one time. 



Specific Recommendations ; 

In order to reduce the approximate $215, 7^0 deficit, the following 
is recommended? 

(a) Increase children's admission charge during daytime hours from 10^ 
to 20^o 

(b) Eliminate scrip tickets for adults due to their minimal use. 

Increased revenue estimated to be $1*5,100. 

9, — » Industrial Athletic Division (Industrial Division of Recreation 
and Park Department) ! 

In 1918 a group of men in San Francisco sold various firms of the 
city the idea of providing employees of industrial firms with leisure 
time sport activities of all types. They formed the "Industrial 
Athletic Association" with a board of directors to guide the recreation 
activities of fellow employees. In 1935 "toe field became so large and 
the duties so manifold that the group could no longer devote the amount 
of time required to carry on the plan. They appealed to the Gan Francisco 
Recreation Department for aid and asked that the Department's adult 
division assume the duties performed by them. In July 1935 the 
"Industrial Division of the San Francisco Recreation Department" was 
organized. A board of directors, 10 in number, was elected from repre- 
sentatives of major firms to administer the work of the Industrial 
Division. In 1951 at the time of the merger of Recreation and Park 
there were 2k paid members. By July 1, 1952 there were 79 firms listed. 

The administration of this division is sow centralized in a board 
of 15 directors. There are 5H active laambersMpa at present. Bach firm 
is represeBted by one mas and one woman on a Board of Representatives. 
They act as aa&assadoxa of recreation with the Supervisor of Athletics 
(men's activities) sad Supervisor of Athletics (women's activities), who 
are th* r epr e s e nt atives of the Department to the Industrial Division 
Board of Directors. The Executive Committee of this organisation is 
composed of: 



93 



They shall: 



RECREATION AND PARK 

Its Officers and 

Supervisor of Athletics (Men's activities) 

Supervisor of Athletics (Women's activities) 

a. Submit the recreational calendar of the Recreation 

and Park Department e 
b« Solicit, receive, investigate, and report upon all 

applications for membership to the Board of Directors « 
Co Transact all necessary business affecting this 

organization* 

Includes: 

(1) Preparing and sending literature to all member 
firms concerning the particular recreational 
activity about to be staged. 

Contact member firms and stimulate inbra-plant 
competition. 

(2) Collecting all monies due and owing to the 
organization for memberships and entrance fees. 
Depositing and accounting for these monies. 

The annual membership fee is nov $15 .00 per organization or team 
which generates annual revenue of $810 covering general expense of 
operation,, 

Programs include: 

Estimated number 
Activity of participant.'^ 

Golf Tournaments (2) ^0 

Bowling - Men 175 

Bowling - Women 200 

Basketball League (men) 80 

Basketball League (women) W 

Tennis Clinic 72 

Tenuis Tournaments 200 

Table Tennis Tournament 130 

Badminton (Weekly) 11 

Soft Ball Leagr.e 322 

Volley Ball (mixed) 150 

Snow Trip 285 

Total Participants 2,153 

Sash firs or fcfce individual participant pays an entrance fee to 
cover cost of officiating, equipment and prizes. 

The Recreation Division furnishes the following manpower for the 
Industrial Association's activities: 



<* 



RECREATIOH ASD PARK 



Average 
Approx Annual Wage Expense 
Supervisor Personnel Time Spent Rate of Pay of Activities 



1-Supv* of Athletics (men) 15$ 
1-SupVo of Athletics (woman) 5O5& 
1 - Supervising Director 

(Athletics) 15i 

Total Department Wage Expense 


$3>9U 
Q,k9k 

8,900 


$1,274 
U,2Vf 

$6,856 



The Recreation and Park Department is reimbursed for these services,, 
Based on the present firm membership, the cost is $127 per firm. 

Spec ific Recommendation ; 

The expense to the department for services rendered shotild be 
reimbursed by the participating firms » One of the three methods sug- 
gested, or any combination of them, should "be adopted in order to create 
an annual fund of approximately $7,000: 

(a) Membership fees should be increased from $15 annually to a higher 
rate for all member firms . 

(NOTEj At present it would be approximately $125 to $130 per firm ) 

(b) Membership fees should be increased from $15 annually and prorated 
on the basis of the number of employees employed by a participating 
firm, 

(c) Individuals or teams participating in each activity could "be charged 
as increased entrance fee. 

The cost of Recreation and Pars services will be reinibuvsea "by 
payment "by the Industrial Division,, 

IQo — » Softball Association: 

The "Director of Athletics - Male" acts as the CossaiBSianer of the 
Softball Association Activities is San Francisco,, However., she nominal 
amount of tiaus spent by the Director to serve this activity is covered 
by entrance fees paid by each teas in the leagae. 

The Director prepares the schedule for the league and collects the 
entrance fees, which are Get to cots? wages of officials, egjAipaenfc 
used, and trophies „ The officials (umpires) are furnished by the Bapises 
Association and are paid at the end of the season by the "Cossaisaioner . " 

Specific Recotaeadation: 

Ho change is recosaended at this t£se„ Any expense to the fiepart- 
Esni in the future should be included in tlse entry fees for each league,, 



95 



RECREATION AiiD PARK 



11, — , Golden Gate Park Tennia Courts ; 

The 21 tennis courts axe under the direct supervision of the 
Athletic Section (Female) of the Recreation and Park Department. Tvo 
employees,, one full-time and one part-time Recreation Director supervise 
these courts seven days a week at an average annual cost of $9>5-A» 

The courts are used "by some 31 groups consisting of various schools, 
colleges, clubs, the general public, and for top tournament play. 
Reservations must be made by players for week-ends, while they can use 
the courts week days without reservations. A reservation costs 2$$ per 
court per hour. 

In December 1959 a club house was erected at an expense of $77,000. 
The entire installation is appraised at $90,000. During the 1960-61 
fiscal year $21,700 was appropriated to resurface some of these courts 
to make them suitable for tournament play. 

Approximately 11 clubs or organisations hold 11 tennis tournaments 
on week-ends during the year. Tournament use covers hh days and occupies 
courts for approximately lk60 hours. Each player must pay an entrance 
fee to participate. The club, under whose auspices the tournament is 
held, collects such fees to cover tournament expenses, such as trophies, 
balls, etc. The Recreation Division assigns up to 10 of the 21 courts 
for such play. No fee has been charged in the past for tournament play. 
However, the general public cannot use the courts assigned to tournament 
play, yet must pay the reservation fee for the unasslgned courts. Private 
courts, such as San Francisco State College, charge a rental as high as 
$50 per day for tournament use. 

Income from these courts was as follows for the 1959-60 fiscal 
year:- 

Reservations $1,95^-00 

Club house lockers (@ $3.00 annually) 389* 00 

Total — $2,3^3.00 

Expenditures for personal services — 9»51koOO 

Net expense for personal services — $7»171o00 

S pecific Recommendations ; 

(a) Increase week-end reservation fees from 25^ 
per court hour to 75$. 

Estimated anmsal increase $3*900.00 

(b) Establish a tournaseat court fee of $fc0 
per day to cover use of up to 10 courts. 
B&sad upon kk touraaiaent days, annual 

increase in revenue would be $1»7o0q00 

Total Annual Increase In Revenues- $5,660.00 

96 



RECHEATIOH AMD PARK 



This recommended increase In revenue added to current revenue of 
$2,3^3 sad revenue from the professional at this location of $890 (based 
upon seven months' experience vith the current agreement) would result 
in a total annual revenue of approximately $8,890 - leaving a deficit of 
approximately $625. 

12. — Camp Mather ; 

Eased on all available data, Camp Mather produces revenue in excess 
of the coats of operation. Revenues from camp fees have been approx- 
imately $115,000 per season, while operating budgets have been as fol- 
lows s- 

1958-59 $101,066 

1959-60 103,717 

IS60-61 10l*,558 

The Recreation and Bark Commission has increased campins fees, 
effective vith the 1961 season. Based upon attendance in the i960 
season, this will increase revenue by $19,2*28 to a total of $13'', 069 
in the 1961 season. 

The figures for the i960 season and estimates of the 1951 season 
ares- 

Camper i960 i960 196l Est. 196 l Revenue 
days rate revenue rate revenue increase 

Adults 12,890 $6,50 $83,785 $7,50 $96,675 $12,890 

Children (10-17) 5,922 3.50 20,727 ^,00 23,688 2,961 

Children (3-9) 7,153 1.50 10,279 2,00 lU,306 3,577 

Children (under 3) 1,505 K.C. — N.C. 

27^70 $115^1 $13^669 I3&M8 

Adding an additional expense of $5,000 per season, over the budget 
amounts shown above, to cover clean-up and maintenance by Bark Division 
personnel, vould increase the 1960-61 season costs to $109,558» 0° *&« 
basis of the new rate structure, this would leave en excess of about 
$25,000 over normal operating requirements for the 1961 season. (HOTS: 
The above does not consider any amounts for Reconstruction and Repl. 
ment which may be included In the budget, ) 

Personnel handling Camp Mather consist of: 



97 



RECREATION AND •'ASK 



1 - Gardener - Full Time 

Part Time 

1 - Janitor 2§ mo c 

1 - Gardener k mo. 

1 - Operating Engineer k mo. 

1 - Accountant 7 mo. 

1 • Recreation Director 2^ mo, 

1 - Camp Manager fc. mo, 

1 - Pastry Cook (Temp. ) 2f mo. 

1 - Chef (Temp. ) 2f mo, 

2 ■!• Cooks (Temp.) 2 mo. 
1 - Emergency Hosp. Steward 2| mo. 

32 - Camp Assistants (Temp. ) 2§ mo. 

kk Total 

Specific Recommendation ; 

Ho additional increase in rates should "be made ncw Rates should 
he kept under review so that they can he increased as needed to cover 
higher costs of operation. 

13 » ~ Coit Tower i 

This operation is primarily for sight-seers and was constructed 
with money received by bequest. It is open 363 days of the year. Three 
employees, a vendor and two janitors, man the tower. 

An estimated *&26*,500 people used the tower for viewing the -area. 
Those who used the elevator to reach the top, paid a fee. The revenue 
for 1959-60 was $35,398 and estimated revenue for 1960-61 is $32,500. 

The estimated expenditures to operate the tower for 19&)-6l are 
$22,972, for a net profit of approximately $9,529, 

Specific Recommendation: 



Ho change is recoasasmded at this time, as it is self-supporting. 

lfc. — Golf Courses t 

The Department operates 18-holo golf courses at Sarding Park, 
Lincoln Park and Sharp Park (San Mateo County), and a 9-holo course in 
Golden Gate Park. 

T2» personnel is composed of 17 Recreation Division employees and 
te Park Division employees. This includes: 



98 



RECREATION AMD PARK 
Ho„ Title Division 



1 


Aasto Director of Recreational Activities 


Recreation 


12 


Starters 


tt 


k 


Janitors 


i> 


1 


SupVo of Golf Course Maintenance 


Bark 


3 


Foreman Gardener 


ii 


1 


Sub-Foreman Gardener 


it 


32 


Gardeners 


it 


_£ 


Chauffeurs (Motorized equipment operators) 


it 


59 


Total 





The Assistant Director of Recreational Activities, who reports to 
the Superintendent of Recreation, handles the starters and Janitors at 
each course* He is also responsible for the collecting of fees* 

The Supervisor of Golf Course Maintenance is responsible for the 
general maintenance and changes of the greens and fairways and landscap- 
ing of the courses » He- reports to the Superintendent of Parks,, 

The estimated expenditures for 196*0-61 are $MB2 9 3k6 exclusive of 
fringe benefits The estimated revenue for 1960-6*1 from the four courses 
based on the actual income during the year 1959-60 is $U86,lf70 a If these 
estimates are met, a net revenue of approximately $U,100 will be realized 

In the 1961-62 budget a request has been made for McLaren Golf 
Course to have 1 Sub-foreman Gardener, 6 Gardeners and 1 Chauffeur,. This 
would mean an approximate $52,750 wage expenditure based on the 1960-61 
average wage rates „ 

The following tournaments have been scheduled during the current 
year; 

HARDING PARK 

Club Championship - May 7-1"+ - 21-28 (k Sundays) 

Election Day - August 27 (Sunday) 

Directors Cup - September 2k. Oct* 1-8 - 15-22 (5 Sundays) 

Turkey - December 10 (Sunday) 

Qualifying 196l Public Linlis Championships - June 17-18 
(Saturday and Sunday)* 

LI3C0XB PARK 

Claib Cfcaapieasfcip - April 9-16 - 23-30 Key ? (5 Seaaays) 
Directors Cap - Oct. 8-15 - 22-29, Hov* 5 (5 Sundaya) 

Thanksgiving - Bovsaftxar 19 (Scaflay) 

Christmas - Deces&ar 3 (Sunday) 



99 



RECREATION AND PARK 

SHARP PARK 

CM) Championship - May 21-28„ June lv-11-lfl (5 Sundays) 
Medal Play - August 6 (Sunday) 

Directors Cup - Sept„ 10-17-24,, 0ct o 1-8 (5 Sundays) 
Turkey - November 11 (Saturday) 

Industrial Division Recreation and Park Department - April 
15-22 (2 Saturdays ) 

These tournaments decrease the Sundays available for public play, 
as they are only open to course "Club Members." An individual may not 
be able to obtain a starting time on these days There have been a 
number of complaints registered relative to this subject, as the courses 
are supposed to be open to public play Normally, starting times for 
Saturday are reserved at the Recreation and Park Department headquarters 
on the pz-eceding Tuesday, valla Sunday reservations are made the previous 
Wednesday,, 

The Recreation and Park Commission recently adopted the afore- 
mentioned tournament schedule with the provision that a comprehensive 
study be made relative to future times and dates of tournaments. No 
further "Club" Tournament dates are to be set until such a study is 
completed in an effort to treat all citizens fairly and equitably,. 

The current golf fees were increased slightly in early 1959.. The 
rate per round vac ^cree.sea from $l u 50 to $1„75 at Lincoln in ?*erch y 
1961. (See Cclf Rates - Sxbi' it XXV) R_.-enuet Trom all seurcec was 
$^,C00 during the 1959-60 operation* 

The attendance based on the number of rounds of golf and revenue 
for 1959-60 was as follows: 



Course 

(a) Harding Park 

(b) Sharp Park 

(c) Lincoln Park 

(d) Golden Gate Park (9 hole) 
Food Sales 



*No« of Rounds 


1959-60 Revenue 


125,552 
86,Ol»3 
72,550 
91,660 


$179,700 

125,300 

95,600 

66,600 

16,800 



♦ (includes monthly cards, regular, late and student rounds) 
Combining (a), (b) and (e) - Average round, ».„&U 37 per round 



A golf fee increase is recommended, whenever additional revenue la 
required to cover any "out-of-pocket" expense for any wage Increase 
adopted, incliiding payroll fringe benefit coats. This will continue 
this operation on a self-supporting basis. 



100 






For the fiscal year 1959-60, the entire golf operation has been 
self -supporting with a snail surplus revenue if payroll fringe bene- 
fits are ignored. However, if the proposed approximate 5$ wage 
increase is adopted by the Board of Supervisors, this will mean an 
estimated increase of $23,600 for base salaries and wages . In 
addition^ if the McLaren Park Course personnel requirement is approved, 
an additional $52,750, plus 5$ increase of $2,638, or $55,3££j must be 
added to the golf course's annual, wage costs. Payroll fringe benefit 
costs will total $77,000. 

15. — Stadiums and Kezar Pavilion 

(a) Balboa Stadium is used exclusively for soccer football contests. 
The top league or first division soccer teams play their games 
here. The city receives a percentage of the revenue from paid 
admissions to special soccer events. This revenue amounted to 
$3,328 in 1959-60, and is estimated to be approximately $2,500 
for 1960-61. No expenditure figores are available for this 
stadium itself, as it is maintained as a part of Balboa Park,, 

(b) Golden Gate Park Stadium is used for polo games, track meets, 
high school football practice and games, bicycle races, and rugby 
games. One man maintains the janitor services. The estimated 
expenditures are $10,265, which includes wage and miscellaneous 
expenses. The polo field rental of $220 for 1959-60 is the only 
revenue attributable to this operation. This is derived from a 
fee of $10 per game. Revenue of $230 is estimated for 1960-61. 
This does not nearly cover the expense for a crew of eight or 
nine men who must spend half a day reconditioning the field the 
morning after a game. 

(c) Kezar Stadium and Kezar Pavilion are combined for Recreation and 
Park accounting records and for the purpose of this report. 

The two locations had the following events during 1959-60 s 

Basket- Estimated 

ball Football Track Special Attend- 

Oames Games Meets Bvents Rental snce 

Kezar Stadium . 38 *5** - $153,69** 560,000 
Kezar Pavilion *106 - - 7 2,953 56,600 

*Participation from public and parochial sehools, 
several athletic clubs, and Industrial League 
Basketball. 



101 



RECREATION AND TABIC 



The special events were composed of Northern California Table 
Tennis Championships, San Francisco Examiner Basketball School, folk 
dancing on eight Sundays, Boy Scouts Night , Brum and Bugle competition 
sponsored by Native Sons, and Shrine Brill Team In drill practice once 
a week for a four-month period. 

During 1960-61 the same events are anticipated, and, in addition, 
there will be approximately 72 special boxing and wrestling events in 
the pavilion. These latter guarantee $250 each, or approximately 
$18, COO income. 

These three stadiums and the pavilion combined will have an 
estimated 673,100 attendance, $113>'*79 in expenditures, and $195*730 
in revenue. This would net approximately $82,251 in revenue for the 
year I96O-I96I. 

Specific Recommendations 

(a) In the future all outside adult groups (other than programs for 
children and Recreation Division organized programs) which hold 
special events or activities at Kezar Stadium, Golden Gate Park 
Stadium, or in Kezar Pavilion, should pay a fee sufficient to 
cover the related expenses of the Bepartment. A definite 
schedule should be established and a procedure printed as to the 
method of handling such requests. The plan should include a fee 
for such activities as folk dancing, drum and bugle corps 
competition or practice, drill team competition or practice, etc. 

(b) A minimum fee of $100 per polo game should be charged to cover 
the major portion of the Department's expense of maintaining the 
Golden Gate Bark Stadium. 

16. — Model Yacht Club 

This facility, located in Golden Gate Park, is the center for 
model motor beat and sail boat construction and operation. Spreckels 
Lakej, which is immediately adjacent to the clubhouse, affords the 
necessary water facilities for the model marine activities. 

The membership of the club, which is open to the general public, 
consists of 67 members at present. This number varies depending upon 
current activities and interest. 

The small building is maintained by the membership, while the 
grounds are maintained by Park Division personnel as a part of 
Golden Gate Park. 

No recreation supervision is provided for this activity. 



102 



RECREATIOH MO PARK 



Specific Recommendationo 

(a) As there is no specific Recreation Department coverage at this 
location, no change is recommended in operation or fee to be 
charged for this facility at this time. 

(b) In the future no facilities should be provided or erected by 
Recreation and Park exclusively for small groups of citizens to 
handle specialized sports or activities* 

17. —• Angler' 8 Lodge 

This building is used for meetings of the Golden Gate Angling and 
Casting Club, the Sheriff's Air Squadron Patrol and San Francisco Mounted 
Patrol. Each group has one regular meeting per month. 

The Angling and Casting Club maintains and polices the lodge 
building. The fly casting pools are used by the Angling and Casting 
Club enthusiasts and have become nationally and internationally known. 

The Recreation Division does not provide supervision at this 
installation* The grounds are maintained as a part of Golden Gate Park. 

Specific Recommendations 

(a) As there is no specific Recreation Division coverage at this 
location, no change is recommended in operation or fee to be 
charged for this facility at this time. 

(b) In the future no facilities should be provided or erected by 
Recreation and Park exclusively for small groups of citizens to 
handle specialized sports or hobbies. 

18. °- San Francisco Zoological Gardens 

The £960-61 budget for the San Francisco Zoo was $U51 P 200. The 
personnel at the Zoo consist of s 

Director of the Zoo 1 

Head Animal Keeper 1 

Assto Head Animal Keeper 1 

Animal Keepers 28 

Operating Engineer 1 

Working Foreman Janitor 1 

Janitors k 

Janltress 1 

Foreman Gardener 1 

Gardeners 10 

Total 1»9 



IX>3 



IiECREATIOB AHD PARK 



Attendance was approximately 1,500,000 (based upon a report in 
Zoos and Aquariums in the U. S» and Canada, American Association of 
Zoological Parks and Aquariums - October, 1958 )o There are no accurate 
records to indicate the relative proportion of children and adults 
visiting the Zoo. However, there is substantial agreement that a one-to- 
one ratio, or fifty per cent adults and fifty per cent children, would be 
a reasonable estimate. 

A survey made by the San Francisco Zoological Society In the summer 
of 1959 indicated that only 25$ of the visitors to the Zoo were residents 
of San Francisco. The actual distribution was as follows t 



San Francisco 


25* 


Rest of Bay Area 


37 


Rest of California 


25 


Rest of U.S. 


12 


Foreign 


1 



The San Francisco Zoological Society works closely with the Zoo 
administration. They operate rides and food concessions in the Zoo and 
at the associated Fleishhacker Playground. (Payment to the city for these 
concessions will approximate $19,000 for the fiscal year 1961-62.) The 
profits of the Socieiy's operations are devoted to providing for the Zoo 
animals, animal structures or ccgss and equipment not available from the 
budget. 

Specific Recommendations 

It is recommended that admission charges be made at the San Francisco 
Zoo. 

Based upon annual attendance of 1,500,000 (750,000 adult and 750,000 
children) admission charges of 75 cents for all parsers Ik years old or 
over would produce revenue of $5^2*500 per year. 

Many cities (a partial list is shown in Exhibit 3XVI) charge 
admission to their Zoos, thus defraying all or a portion of the expense of 
operation. 

Collecting admission charges will, of course, adtl to the cost of 
operation of the Zoo. There are two entrances that would have to be 
covered. The use of coin operated turnstiles, with related cashiers' 
booths would probably be the most economical way of collecting admission 
charges. It would appear that two booths ax the main gate on Sloat 
Boulevard and one booth at the south entrance would be; adequate. Further- 
more, it probably would not be necessary to man one of the tvo c&oths st 
the main gate except on Saturdays, Sundays and holidays* To maintain this 
coverage, salary expenses, including relief s vacation and holiday coverage, 
and also including retirement contributions and Social Security taxes, 
would amount to approximately $31*000 per year (excluding any consideration 
of additional capital expenditures). 

16k 



ilSCBEATIQH AMD PARK 



On the basis that 75$ of the people visiting the Zoo come ?ron out 
of town, the suggested charges would result in payment by out-of-town 
visitors of about $421,875 per year toward the operation and maintenance 
of the Zoo, with a corresponding reduction in the requirement for funds 
from the ad valorem tax. Payments made by San Francisco residents, on the 
same basis, would amount to $1*10,625, which would also reduce by this 
amount the requirement for tax monies . Thus, those using the Zoo would 
pay all costs of operation. 

19* ~ Storyland 

This new facility, located near the Zoo, was built in part with 
$116,750 received from public subscription and $21*9,803 from the 
General Fund. The staff consists of two Recreation Directors and two 
Recreation Assistants. 

The estimated cost of operation for the fiscal year 1960-61 is: 

Personal services $50,2^0 

Materials, supplies, etc. 1,275 

$51,515 

An admission charge of 10^ is made for children under 12 a and 15^ 
for all others. 

In its first year of operation (fiscal 1959-60) admissions totaled 
$68,300 and revenue from concessions $3,000, or a total of $71,300. 
However, this very favorable result was apparently due to its novelty, 
as the revenue for fiscal I96O-61 is estimated to be $'+3,000 and for 
1961-1962, to be $37,000. 

The projected continuing falling off of income seems to indicate 
that to a great extent, this installation has a one-visit appeal. This 
is borne out by a drop of about 40$ in attendance from the first to the 
second year of operation and a further drop expected next year. 

Recreation and Park Department publicity states that "Storyland 
gives the most for the least to the people of any project of its caliber." 

Specific Recommendations 

(a) While no revision of fees is recommended at this time, a close 

watch should be kept on this activity, and if the 196l»62 admissions 
decrease in accordance with present estimates, Storyland should be 
abandoned or a concessionnaire sought to operate the facility at a 
profit. 



105 



RECRBATIOH AMD PARK 



(b) It has been planned to double the size of this Installation at en 
additional cost of about a quarter of a million dollars <> In view of 
the observations above, it is recommended that this proposed expend- 
iture be abandoned or deferred until the installation has demon- 
strated that it can be made self-supporting, including the future 
repair and maintenance costs, which, at the present time, are at a 
minimum due to its nevnesso As an alternative, this expansion might 
be made, but only if the cost were entirely covered by public 
subscription in the manner of Oakland's "Fairyland." 

As a matter of interest, "Storyland" was erected, its proponents 
say, because a then member of the Board of Supervisors "wearied of 
driving his daughter to Oakland's Fairyland." 

Fairyland, however, was conceived and is operated on a different 
basis than "Storyland." It was started by an association called 
"Lake Merritt Breakfast Club," and all costs were defrayed by 
public subscriptions, legacies, and bequests* The funds are 
deposited in a bank as a private Trust Fund separate from municipal 
funds, and are administered by the Recreation Board with the con- 
currence of the Club, and is entirely self-supporting. The instal- 
lation was planned and built by the staff of the Department and the 
Club. The Installation is beamed more to a domestic animal zoo and 
play apparatus. 

Fairyland Is an example of an activity maintained by private 
support and modest fees paid by those who patronize it. San Fran- 
cisco could well follow this example when small pressure groups 
agitate for a special program or installation beamed to a limited 
number of persons. Had this been done, Storyland would have been 
developed more along the lines of Fairyland and only within tho 
limits of funds provided by public subscription o 

20. — Rifle Range at Sharp Park 

Eleven thousand seven hundred sixty-two service units were handled 
on weekends and during three tournaments at the range at Sharp Park. 

Two part-time Recreation Directors and one maintenance man operate 
the range at an estimated annual cost of $2,938 for wages. The 
revenue from this installation was $^,217 for 1959-60, and is estimated 
it will be $1*,200 in 1960-&L. 

RoO.T.C. units and the Sheriff's Posse use the range free of 
charge. 

Specific Recommendation 

As long as the revenue from this operation continues to cover the 
expenditures, no change in operation or increase in fees is re co- rinded. 



106 






21. — Archery Range at Sharp Park 

The archery range at Sharp Park is used by individuals &:ad groups 
daily and on weekends o No organized on-the -ground supervision is pro-* 
vided by the department,, 

The club groups that use the range provide their own supervision. 
They hold five to seven special shoots each year. Reservations for the 
range are cleared through the Recreation Division (Athletic Section). 

Specific Recommend ation 

As long as this operation does not cause the department any 
expense, no change in operation or fee is recommended. 

22. — Beach Chalet Operation 

This building, located in Golden Gate Park, is leased to the 
Veterans of Foreign Wars, Jo Co McQuaid Post, on an annual basis for 
$50.00 per month minimum guarantee* In turn, it is used by various 
clubs, associations, or groups for dances throughout the year on a sub=> 
lease basis. Each group who sub-lease the building pay a scheduled fee 
to the V. Fo Wo Post. In turn, the city receives a snail percentage 
from each rental. 

The Veterans Post cleans the building, so that Recreation and Park 
Department need not furnish manpower. The Commission, however, must 
approve any sub-leasing of the building. 

Specific Recommendation 

No change is recommended, as long as Recreation ene Park Department 
reviews the use of the property on a periodic basis * 



At present, there are a total of 257 berths in the Municipal Yacht 
Harbor. Of these, only 32, built in 1959> are of modern construction 
with both header floats and slips or finger floats, aid with water and 
electricity available to each boat. The other 225 berths consist, for 
the most part, of two, four, or more piles, and notairsg else* Of these 
only 53 have header floats. Header floats at all other berths in this 
group, and slips or finger floats in all of these bert-ls, must be pro- 
vided at the expense of the lessee of the berth. Water and electricity 
connections must also be provided at the expense of the occupant. In 
effect, the city rents the water space for these old berths. 

'.Kates for the 32 new berths ara, in general, higher than the charges 
made by other small boat harbors in San Francisco Bay area providing the 
same service and facilities. These rates should not he changed. 



107 






Bate* L<5 berths are generally considerably belov rates in 
other small boat harbors en the Bay. This comparison is not fully 
significant since the other harbors provide all floats as veil as 
electricity and water connections 

Bsrsouaei handling the Yacht Harbor are: 

1 Harbormaster (Limited tenure) C-160 $ 5,919 

3 Watchmen C-152 (2^ hour a day coverage) 1^,382 
1 tfatchman (Bart-time) C-152 (Covers Saturday 

nights, vacation relief, holidays, etc») 1,600 

Annual wage total $21,901 

At present rates, annual revenues from the Yacht Harbor vill be 
approximately $^2,600 for the fiscal year 1960-6I0 Suspenses, including 
salaries, contract charges, material and supplies, public utilities, 
retirement allowance, and repairs are estimated at about $32^300 for the 
fiscal year I960-6I0 This leaves approximately $10,300 as income in 
excess of expenditures (excluding any consideration of capital charges )» 
It is possible that the proposed expansion and rehabilitation plans 
for the Yacht Earbor, based upon a state loan, vill be adopted. In this 
event, one requirement of the state will be the establishment of rates 
adequate to make the operation self-supporting, including major mainte- 
nance, operating costs, interest, and amortization of the loan.. 

Specific Recommendation 

If the proposed plan is not adopted, or is delayed^ it is 
recommended that a simple departmental survey of the old berths be 
made to correct existing records, which,, in many instances, do not re- 
fleet the correct size of berths o Following this y new berthing rates 
should be established, based upon a realistic evaluation of the value of 
the berthing space on the Marina, taking into consideration the minimal 
facilities provided. It is believed that such an approach would result 
in an appreciable increase in revenues. 



108 



RECREATION AND PARK 



GOLF RATES 



EXHIBIT XXV 
(As of 3/1/61) 



MONTHLY CARDS: 



HEW REGULATIONS: 



Good on week days and after 2 p.m. 
Saturdays, Sundays and Holidays 

on all courses (h p.m. (D.S.T. )) 
Charge per round played 

Students oust have an authorized 
"Qualification Card" to play on 
regulation length courses. 

Per round (Saturdays, Sundays and 
Holidays included) 

After 2 p.m. (Saturdays, Sundays and 

Holidays included) (U p.m. (D.S.T.)) 
Ho special rates for students 



HARDING 

HIHE>HOLB COURSE : Per round (Saturdays, Sundays and 
Holidays included) 



HARDING: 



SHARP PARK: 



LINCOLN PARK: 



$ 6.00 



.25 



Per round (Saturdays, Sundays and 

Holidays included) 
After 2 p.m. (Saturdays, Sundays and 

Holidays included) (k p.m. (D.S.T.)) 
Ho special rates for students 

Per round (Saturdays, Sundays and 
Holidays included) 

After 2 p.m. (Saturdays, Sundays 

and Holidays included) (k p.m. (D.S.T.)) 
Student "8 Monthly Card good weekdays only 

after 2 p.m. Junior High School Students 

only 
Ho special rates for students (other 

than Monthly Card) 



GOLDEN GATE PARK 
GOLF COURSE: 



RESERVATIONS: 



Per round ( Saturdays , 
Holidays included) 



Sundays and 



Lincoln, Harding and Sharp Park Golf 
Courses, Saturdays, Sundays and 
Holidays only, per person 



2.00 
1.00 



• 75 

1.75 
1. 00 

1.75 
1.00 
3-00 



.75 



• 25 



ZOO ADMISSION CHARGES 



RECRSATIOE AH) ?ARK 
EXHIBIT XXVI 



Cities 

Phoenix 

Los Angeles 

Sacramento (Children's Zoo) 

San Diego 

Granby, Quebec 

Colorado Springs 

Daytona, Florida 

Silver Springs, Florida 

Brookfield, Illinois 

Libertyville, 111. (Sat.,Sun.& Holidays) 

Peoria, 111. 

H. Y. Zoological Park 

Cincinnati 

Cleveland 

Columbus 

Toledo 

Philadelphia 

San Antonio 

Salt Lake City 

Average 



Adults 



Children 



$ .50 


$ .25 


.25 


.15 


.15 


.10 


• 75 


(Free to 16) 


• 25 


Free 


.25 


.25 (over 5) 
.60 (over 6) 


1.50 


1.15 


.60 


.25 


Free 


.25 


.10 


.35 


(Free to 15) 


.25 


.25 (over h) 


.50 


.25 (2 to 12) 


.25 


(Free to 12) 
(Free to 12) 


.35 


• 50 


(Free to 12) 


.75 


.25 


• 35 


.10 


.25 


.10 (over 5) 


$ M 


$ .25 (average 




of Cities charg- 




ing for all 




children. ) 



RECREATION AND PAT;{t 



SAVINGS AND ADDITIONAL REVENUE 

Page 
Savings 110 

Additional Revenue 110 



109 



SAVINGS AND ADDITION AL REVE NUE; 

The adoption and implementation of recommendations made by 
Recreation and Park Task Force would result in the following: 

Savings ; 

1. Reduction of current operating costs through elimination of 
17 positions resulting from reorganisation e.nd curtailing of aetivf 
rescheduling of morning pi'ograms to afternoon, and application of i 
measurement techniques, , .$610,000 

2. Estimated one-time z'ealixation of value of eight major 
properties: 

McLaren Park (undeveloped portion) $3,600,000 

Bay View Park 130,000 

Sunset Heights Park 125,000 

Du Pont and Richmond Tennis Courts 288,000 

James Rolph, Jr. Playground 305,000 

Bay View Playground 250,000 

Alta Plaaa (portion) 620,000 

Lafayette Park (portion) 4o6,OOQ 5/72^,000 

(Note; Additional savings could undoubtedly 
be achieved through a detailed and complete 
survey of all Recreation and Park properties) 

3. Prevention of estimated future operating costs throug] 
position of land(2.), 290, 

ho Prevention of proposed capital Improvement expeisditures ; 

a. Included in 5-year program: 

McLaren Park (excluding golf course) 2,230,000 
Balboa Park Nursery (move to fcScKaren) 170,000 

b. Long-range program: 

McLaren Park 4,270,000 6,67c 

Additional ^Revenue : 

1. Estimated annual ad valorem taxes from land returned to 1 
tax rolls (2.),..» .... .... 1,33V 

2. Estimated proposed new or additional admissions and 
fees, p ............ 8kk } 



110 






A REPORT TO THE 
BLYTH-ZELLERBACH COMMITTEE 



ON 

MODERN MANAGEMENT 

FOR SAN FRANCISCO 



The Budget 
"Wage and Salary Administration 
Purchasing and Related Activities 

JUNE 1961 VOLUME 4 



THE BUDGET 
WAGE AND SHAW ADMINISTRATION 



PURCHASING AND M&ATED ACTIVITIES 



Ifeports of the 
Task Forces 



-Jane 2961 



A 

REPORT 

WITH RECOMMENDATIONS 

CONCERNIBQ 

THE BUDGET 

OF THE CITY & COURT! 
OP SAN FRANCISCO 



BY THE 

BODSET TASK FORCE 

OF THE 

MAYOR'S COMMITTEE FOR MUNICIPAL MAHA8EMEH ? 



MAY 1961 



xats mi- 
May 1961 
Sustain, 
Project Director 

Mayor's Committee for Municipal Management 
San Francisco, California 

Dear Mr. Mustain: 

During the past five months the Budget Task For^j has studied the 
design, preparation and utility of the San Franciscc City and County 
budget. This teas consisted of three analysts, all living had many 
years experience in systems and procedures work. 

Throughout this survey important background kncj Ledge was obtained 
by study of current budget literature. The writings of recognized 
authorities in the field of municipal budgeting were jxamined, including 
the following: 

Orin K. Cope, Assistant to the City Manager, Sea Diego, California 

Vernon E. Koch, City Budget Director, Cincinnati, Ohio 

Samuel Leask, Jr., Chief Administrative Officer , Los Angeles, 
California 

Frank A. Lowe, Municipal Finance Officers Association 

Komer D. Reed, City Manager, Valdosta, Georgia 

George C. Shannon, City Manager, Anchorage, Als 3 ;a 

Frank P. Sherwood, Assistant professor, School if Public Adminis- 
tration, University of Southern California, Los \ngeles, California 

Ralph W. Snyder, City Manager, Highland Park, Illinois 

John F. Willmott, Director, Dade County Re sear e a Foundation, 
Miami, Florida 

In addition, much assistance in the development >f this pfoje. 
was obtained from material contained in 

Budgeting and Accounting - U.S. Commission on Organization of 
Executive Branch of Government, (Hoover CommisE L m) A Report to the 
Congress February, 19^9 and June, 1955* 

Budgeting, The Tax Foundation, New York City 

Municipal Year Books, International City Managers Association 

Public Management, Journal of the International City Managers 
Association 



The budgets and procedures of fourteen other cities and counties 
were examined <> Included were the cities of New York, Chicago, 
Los Angeles, San Diego, Milwaukee, Buffalo, Detroit, St. Louis, 
Cincinnati, Oakland and Philadelphia, and the counties of Los Angeles, 
San Diego and Milwaukee. 

The advantages and disadvantages of the San Francisco budget were 
studied in detail from top management, through the chain of responsi- 
bility, to the smallest organizational element in two major departments 
of the city government „ This survey enabled the task force to develop 
and explore in detail the strengths and weaknesses of current operating 
procedures and to relate forms, methodology, purpose and results with 
the views and experiences of budget authorities and the procedures in 
use in other jurisdictions o Other Task Forces contributed extensively 
through questioning budget preparation and utility in departments 
surveyed and in relaying constructive ideas for improvement. Findings 
and suggested measures for improvement were discussed with executives 
of city departments . 

Both preparation and administration of the budget by the Controller's 
Department were studied „ The Controller has been working for several 
years on possible revisions of format and concept and was most coopera- 
tive and helpful through counseling with the Task Force and In the inter- 
change of ideas o Similarly, management and personnel of other depart- 
ments visited cordially assisted in completing the survey,, 

Every effort has been made by all concerned to conduct th?.s survey 
in a purely objective manner . We believe the following findings are 
factual and that adoption of the recommendations in the report will 
produce an outstanding improvement in budgetary procedure „ This, in 
turn, will contribute in great degree to effectiveness and economy in 
city administration. 



A. P. O'Kane 
Chairman 



THE WWffi 



TABLE OF COHTENTS 

Page 

SlEBaary • .o.ooooooooooo.ooooo.oooooo.oooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo 6 
rinCtingS oo.o.o.oooo.ooooeoooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo.o. jSJ 

Recommendations Hot Requiring Charter Revision— None o.ooooo°o * ».« Bone 
Recommendations Requiring Charter Revisioa..o. 11 ........o. 1 ,. 1 ,...o t » 15 

Planning and Scheduling the Budget Change .o.oooooooooooo.ooooooooo 22 
Savings 0.00. .00000. 00000000000. 00000000000000000000000000000000000 25 



THE BUDGET 



INDE X OF EXHIBITS 

EXHIBIT KO« TITLE 

1 PRESENT BUDGET PAGE 

2 ORGANIZATION OF BUDGET DEPARTMENT 

3 JOB SPECIFICATION - BUDGET DIRECTOR 

U JOB SPECIFICATION - SENIOR BUDGET ANALYST 

5 JOB SPECIFICATION - BUDGET ANALYST 

6 JOB SPECIFICATION - JUNIOR BUDGET ANALYST 

7 WORK FROGRAM FORM - BUDGET WORK SHEET 

8 WORK PROGRAM FORM - CAPITAL OUTLAY DETAIL 

9 WORK FROGRAM FORM - PERMANENT SALARIES DETAIL 

10 SUMMARY FORM - WORK PROGRAM SUMMARY 

11 SUMMARY FORM - EXPLANATION SHEET 

12 SUMMARY FORM - CAPSTAL OUTLAY SUMMARY 






SUMMARY 



THE BUDGET 
SUMMARY 



SCOPE 



During the past five months the Budget Task Force, consisting of 
three experienced business analysts, studied the design, preparation 
and utility of the San Francisco budget. Extensive research vas con- 
ducted in budgeting systems and procedure which included the study 
of the wri tings of authorities of national reputation, and a review of 
the budgets and procedures of cities, such as New York, Chicago, 
Los Angeles, Detroit, Milwaukee, Cincinnati, Philadelphia, Buffalo, 
Oakland, San Diego and St. Louis and similar documents of several 
counties. 

Local surveys of budgetary practices were conducted in depth in 
two major departments, supplemented through discussions of this subject 
by task forces in the organizations they surveyed . 

All findings and constructive ideas developed were discussed with 
supervisors and department heads. 

FIKDHSGS 

The San Francisco budget system is obsolete. It is an "Object of 
Expenditure" or "Line-item" type of budget now discarded or in the 
process of being discarded by most progressive city governments. In an 
Object of Expenditure type budget emphasis is placed on items to be 
purchased, such as labor, materials and supplied instead of on the 
activities to be performed and the services to be rendered. 

The San Francisco budget is excessively cumbersome and filled with 
unnecessary detail. In 1960-61, it consisted of 2,067 pages, measuring 
17" x 2U" with a total weight of 130 pounds. Later it is reduced 
photographically to 11" x 17", weighing 21 pounds. The documents are 
too voluminous and unwieldy to penal t full review or intelligent approval c 

Budgets are inflated at the department level in order to expand the 
department's functions, to increase its personnel, to maintain job 
security or in anticipation of drastic pruning. Many such amounts escape 
the pruning process and are added to the department's "hidden surplus" 
for future years. Once established, departments frequently protect 
these levels of expense by spending the full budgeted amounts, despite 
efforts of the Controller to prevent this practice. 

San Francisco budget review procedures focus exclusive attention on 
the increase over the previous year's expenses. There is little or no 
effort to evaluate and justify already existing expenses, and for practi- 
cal purposes, once established, a level of expense is fixed and can 
continue indefinitely. Frequently the reasons for budget reductions are 
not given to department heads. Also, because under Object of Expend! ture 
treatment various elements of a proposed activity may have to be listed 
under several different items, occasionally one essential element of 
such activity is disallowed with other items approved. 



' 



There is no centrally sponsored activity to create cost-mindedness 
in the city organization o A budget normally is intended to control 
expenditures, but the San Francisco version both in type and practice 
works in reverse, San Francisco's procedures invite end encourage 
extravagance . 

Newspaper publication of the budget and Appropriation Ordinance 
1b expensive and ineffectual . 

RECOMMENDATIONS (Charter revision vrill be necessary) 

A complete change in the concept of budgeting is urgently needed 
and a Work Program type budget should replace the present Object of 
Expenditure budge t. 

Requests for budget funds should be expressed in dollars needed " 
to accomplish specific end results rather than to buy certain commodi- 
ties. These end results (Work Programs) should identify and describe 
the basic purposes for which departiaents, bureaus or divisions are 
established. This change will shift emphasis from men, materials and 
Taachines to the functions, activities and services the city government 
provides to its citizens. 

The Work Program format should consist of: (a) description of 
the functions of the department; (b) separate activities (Work Programs) 
within each department; (c) activity statistics to depict work-load 
trends; and (d) short, pertinent explanations as to basic reasons for 
changes proposed. 

The Work program type budget will give department heads and super- 
visors an improved management tool; it will provide information to the 
administrative and legislative branches of government for policy 
formulation, development and maintenance of service standards, priority 
determination and expenditure control; it will give citizens an under- 
standable document and will promote public interest in the effectiveness 
and efficiency of government; it will permit, with safety, considerable 
decentralization of authority to lover levels of management . 

The budget form should be reduced from 17 x 2k inches with twenty- 
nine columns to letter size with nine columns. Instead of the present 
130 and 21 pound documents the Work Program budget will weight about 
one pound, making it a usuable instrument convenient to handle and 
portable between officers for committee discussions. 

With this reduction in size the Mayor's budget should be produced 
in sufficient quantities to permit distribution to news media, civic 
committees, associations, libraries, schools, etc. This will eliminate 
publishing in newspapers and will provide better information to 
interested citizens at a fraction of the present cost. 



A vital part of Work Programming is the establishment of a Budget 
Department, This unit is necessary not only to design, install and 
administer the Work Program budget but also to maintain a constant, 
scheduled surveillance over existing manpower and expense. Detailed 
organization and functions of the Budget Department, with suggested 
forms and procedures for Work Programming are contained in the main 
body of the report. 

Important responsibilities of the Budget Department vill be to 
develop in all departments an attitude of cost-mindedness, to control 
inflation of budget estimates and to eliminate the spending of 
unnecessary budgeted amounts . 

No material change is anticipated in the cost of preparing and 
operating the proposed Work Program budget as compared to the present 
Object of Expenditure budget. Increased analytical work will be offset 
by reductions in the immense quantity of detail now required. However, 
the effect of the Work Program budget plan, including the scheduled 
surveying of existing costs and previewing of budget requests by 
Budget Department analysts, will uncover savings of very substantial 
proportions. Based on the results of pilot-type studies of the city 
organizations made by this Committee, it is estimated that an annual 
saving of five percent of the total budget (other than that of the 
School Department) can result. This will amount to approximately 
$10,000,000 annually. 



The Budget Task Force 

A. P. O'Kane, Chairman 
Russell Ancell 
Marion Marks 



the BUDGET 



FIHDIBB S 

Page 

Type of Present Budget Systeu o.^.too. o.t 10 

SiZe Of Budgeto ..... ........ 0.0.....000.........0..0. ...... ....... 10 

Ho Examination of Current Expense . .......<>.... ...... ...... ....»..<. 11 

Protection of Expense Levels ......... ...... ............a.......... 11 

Budget Inflation. ....... ......... ........a............. ....... ...o. 11 

Review Procedure. .......o..o,,o..o.... < ,.....o»...o.».....oo...oo.oo 12 

Divided Responsibility. .............. oo..a„.....o.o... ...... ...... 12 

Incentives to Cost Control. ....... ... ........... e ........ »......o. 12 

Publication of Budget. ................... ............. .....n...... 13 



THE 33SD3ET 

FBUDBPS 

TYPE <F PKBSEHT BODQET SYSTEM 

The San Francisco budget document is known as an "Object of 
Expenditure" or "Line-Item" type of budget. Such a budget lists 
salaries, wages, articles to be purchased and justification of items in 
great detail, with little information as to the end purposes for which 
the money is to be spento The Object of Expenditure budget is well 
described as an "impenetrable thicket" and as a "guessing game in which 
the immense compilation of uninformative bulget items seem designed to 
defy interpretation and defeat attempts at analysis «" Such a budget 
is practically unintelligible to the publico 

The Object of Expenditure budget was designed primarily for account- 
ing and fund control purposes, In recent years, in most large cities, 
in many small cities, in counties and in states, the budget has been 
redesigned and has emerged as a most valuable tool for effective and 
efficient administration,. 

The new types, termed Work Program, Activity or Performance budgets, 
emphasize the cost of services to be rendered instead of only the 
objects for which money is to be spen t, 

San Francisco's budget was adopted many years before the present 
charter was placed in effect. In it, in 12k departments, bureaus and 
divisions, proposed expenditures are first listed by object of .cpendi- 
tures classifications such as "Personal Services", '"Contractual 
Services", "Materials and Supplies", "Equipment", etc. These basic 
classifications are then sub-divided to show greater detail. For 
example, under "Personal Services" is shown "Overtime", "Holiday pay", 
civil service classifications, and, in some instances, employees' names, 
"Materials and Supplies" is sub-divided to show items such as postage 
stamps, tools and wheelbarrows. 

Historical expenditures in dollars are shown for each of these items 
under columnar headings and, when applicable,- the rate and number of 
employees, current year probabilities, proposed amounts and change, 
together with several spaces for different levels of approval. The 
Object of Expenditure system requires a tremendous volume of explanatory 
material, as increases in each item of expense must be fully supported, 

SIZE OF BMDGET 

The budget page is designed with twenty -nine columns. (Exhibit 1.) 
In 1960-61, the original compilation consists of 2,067 pages, each 
17 x 2h inches in size, bound into three huge volumes weighing 130 pounds . 
After the Mayor's adjustments, the budget is reduced to pages 11 by 17 
inches in size with three volumes weighing about 21 pounds. 



10 



TW sacoisT 



The San Francisco budget is so voluminous snd unwieldy it is 
physically izspossible for any one person to fully review or intelli- 
gently approve it* V.o summary or condensation is provided . The Mayor 
and Board of Supervisors must depend on staff personnel to select the 
items which should receive their attention. The great mass of descrip- 
tive detail is stated in vague and general terms, often differing as to 
type and volume of detail between departments . Many departments 
depend on quantity of detail and rarely is there sufficient demonstra- 
tion of the relationship to health, safety or protection of property, 
or demonstration that the proposed expenditures can be justified by 
"pay-out" or return on the investment., 

NO EXAMINATION OF OJRREEr EXPENSE 

San Francisco budget procedures focus exclusive attention on the 
increase over the previous year's expenses . There is little or no effort 
to evaluate and justify already existing expenses, and for all practical 
purposes, once established, a level of expense is fixed and can continue 
indefinitely. 

(The office of the Administrative Assistant to the Mayor was 
established to examine current manpower and other forms of expense, but 
no scheduled activity of this nature is carried on because the processing 
of supplementary requests, budget review and special assignments occupy 
the full time of this office,) 

PROTECTION O F EXPE NSE IEVELS 

Departments frequently protect these levels of expense by spending 
the full budgeted amounts, whether for essential purposes or not, 
despite efforts of the Controller to prevent this practice . 

BUDGET INFLATION 

Budgets are inflated at the departmental level, to expand the 
department's function or personnel, to maintain job security, or in 
anticipation of drastic pruning by the Mayor and the Board of Supervisors. 
In several quarters it has been stated that inflated budgets are 
presented in order to provide top management wita opportunities to 
make cuts and obtain publicity as "guardians of the taxpayer". In any 
event, buried in the tremendous detail of the budget, many inflated 
items escape the "slashing" process and become permanent additions. 
adding to the department's "hidden surplus" in future year 

Further, the budget document is unnecessarily enlarged and com- 
plicated by including transfer and supplementary datao As regards 
supplements to the budget, a revelw indicated that in 1959-60 there 
were a total of ^50 supplements containing TOO additional items « Of 
these supplements, 29$ should have been handled through normal 
budgetary procedure. Another 29$ of the supplementary requests arose 
from reductions made by the Mayor and Board of Supervisors, which then 
had to be reinstated. The remaining h2$ of the requests were "unfore- 
seeable emergencies "-the only valid reason for supplements. 



11 



BUDGET 

REVIEW PROCEDURE 

The budget is produced under conditions of pressure and strain, 
with much night and week-end work. Approximately 65>0OO man-hours 
are spent in completing the documents,, There is general complaint 
as to budget reviev procedure: 

(1) At some budget meetings, managers are given little 
opportunity to discuss cuts. Seductions are frequently 
made with no explanations to affected departments. This not 
only results in the same requests in subsequent years, but 
produces resentment, confusion and a sense of frustration 
within the departments » 

(2) Recently, some opportunity has been provided to express 
recommended priorities between several proposed items of 
improvement and repair, but this system has not been extended 
to the degree needed. 

(3) Under "line item" treatment, a proposed project may require 
funds to be listed under two or more Object of Expenditure 
headings, with the result that reductions can remove an 
essential part of an activity and leave the remainder of the 
activity unchanged. 

DiriDED RESPONSIBILITY 

The San Francisco budget is not considered "The Mayor's Budget" 
as is the situation in many other major cities. The relationship 
between the Mayor and the Board of Supervisors is not one in which the 
Mayor is voted funds and then held responsible for results. Rather, the 
reviews by the Mayor and by the Board of Supervisors are independent 
and are not coordinated. The Mayor does not defend before the Finance 
Committee of the Board of Supervisors that part of the budget which he 
has previously approved, nor is he advised of the reasons for the 
Board's reductions. Throughout the year the Board of Supervisors 
requires department heats (not the Mayor or his representative) to 
explain the need for their supplemental appropriations. Instruction for 
budget preparation and use are given by three separate offices — The 
Controller, The Mayor and the Board of Supervisors. Confusion as to 
who is in charge necessarily results. 

PCEHTSVES TO COST CONTROL 

There is no centrally sponsored activity to create cost-mindedness 
in the city organization. The primary purpose of a budget is to control 
expenditures, but the San Francisco version both in type and practice 
works in reverse. San Francisco's system and procedures invite and 
encourage extravagance^ 



12 



jhic! iwunai 



HJBIICAT10W OF BUDGET 

The budget and Appropriation Ordinance are first published in the 
official newspaper, by Charter requirement, at the time the Mayor 
forwards the proposed budget to the Board of Supervisors <> The budget 
issue of the newspaper fills 110 pages of Object of Expenditure detail 
in very small type, but contains no descriptive material or supporting 
statistics. There is little information given readers as to the 
activities for which money is to be spent and no Justification for any 
of the activities o 

After changes by the Board of Supervisors and before final 
reading, the Appropriation Ordinance is again published, as required 
by the Charter, in the official newspaper „ Publication costs approximately 
$30,000 annuallyo 

In view of the above and as newspaper issues in question are limited 
both in rubber and distribution, the cost of publication can be 
Cjiiestioneuo 



The above findings should not be construed as criticisms of those 
involved., The Controller, the Chief Administrative Officer, other 
members of Management, the Mayor and the Board of Supervisors are 
doing their best with an antiquated and obsolete systemo 



13 



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RECOMMENDATIONS NOT REQIHRU5S 
CHARTER REVISION — HONE 



RECOMMENDATIONS REQUIRING 
CHARTER REVISION 



Adopt Work Program Budgeting. ...d.....*.................... ....... 15 

?Ormat. ...... ..o.o.o.o. ..o...o. ......ooo.oo..ooooo..o..ooo.o. 15 

Capital Outlay. ......0. .............................. o......*.. 16 

Repair, Maintenance, Replacement and Reconstruction. ........... 1" 

Size of Budget. ... ................ .....a...... ....a............... 17 

Budget Relationships .................... .......................... 17 

Budget Publication 1° 

Advantages of Work Program Budgeting. . ....... .............. .o..... 1° 

Establish a Budget Department. .................................... 19 



1U 



THE BHJDBET 



RBCGMKEKDAT2QHS RBqgffiMP 
OflKTER REV2SS0S 
{Note — To accomplish the following proposed changes, 
Charter revision will be necessary.) 



ADOPT WORK PROGRAM KPOOTDiG 

A complete change in the concept of budgeting is urgently needed; 
a Work Program type budget should replace the present Object of 
Expenditure budgeto 

Requests for budget funds should be expressed in dollars needed 
to accomplish specific end results rather than to buy certain 
commodities o These end results (Work Programs) should identify and 
describe the basic purposes for which departments, bureaus or 
divisions are established. This change will shift emphasis from men, 
materials and machines to the functions, activities and services the 
city government provides to its citizens. 

By way of illustration, the Bureau of Building Repair of the 
Department of Public Works now requests funds under "Line" items 
such as Elevator Operators, Janitors, Carpenters, Allowance for Over- 
time, Wages-Supervisory, Recapping Tires, Carfare, Telephone, Towel 
Service, Paint, etc. There is little identification of the end purpose 
for which the funds are requested. 

In contrast, a Work Program type budget presents expense requests 
in terms of activities such as: Provide Janitor Service for Fob lie 
Buildings; Repair Elevators; Maintain lighting and electrical facilities; 
Maintain heating and ventilating systems; Repair roofs and drains; and 
Paint buildings. (The Charter now requires that "a separate schedule 
of the proposed work program" shall be included or accompany the budget. 
The Mayor '8 Office each year requests submission of budgets in work 
program form. Compliance is negligible.) 



Porn s 



The Work Program format consists of: 

1. A description of the functions of a department, bureau or 
division. 

2. A breakdown of such functions to individual Work Programs 
with applicable amounts for each program shown for the past 
years, together with the current requests, and the amounts of 
increases or decreases. 

3. Work Program Statistics — a compilation of selected performance 
units which, in general, support the increased or decreased 
activity — the work load itself. 



15 






H. Short, pertinent explanatory notes as to basic reasons for 
the changes proposed. These explanatory notes should be 
limited, in the Budget Work Sheets, to changes in excess of 
$100 and, in the Summaries for administrative use, to changes 
in excess of $1,000. These notes should include all personnel 
and salary changes to advise all concerned as to the effect 
of the changes on this category of expense. It is not 
recommended that a separate schedule of existing and proposed 
positions and vage and salary rates accompany the summarised 
Work Program budget, as is done at present. The present 
practice in Borae departments of unauthorized listing of names 
of employees should be discontinued. 

Capital Outlay 

All Capital Outlay requests (Equipment and Projects) should be 
included as a separate Work Program for each budgeting unit. This 
will prevent distortion of trend records which would otherwise occur 
by occasional large purchases or by construction project costs. 
Each department budget form should be supported by a Capital Outlay 
Summary detailing Equipment and Work Projects. Equipment should 
include non-expendable items, generally over $50 in cost and having an 
estimated usefulness of three years or more. Work Projects should 
include unusually large items, i.e., purchase of land, building 
construction, etc. It should also include large repairs, maintenance, 
replacement and reconstruction Jobs costing over $5>000. (This figure 
is recommended in the Purchasing Department section of the Committee's 
report to replace the present $2,000 limitation on contractual bidding 
procedure . ) 

R epair, Maintenance, Replacement and Reconstruction 

Ail expenditures for single repair, maintenance, replacement and 
reconstruction Jobs of $5,000 or less should be handled as Work Programs 
and segregated, in general, according to trade classifications and 
described as "Maintain Lighting and Electrical Facilities, " "Paint 
Buildings, " etc. 

This treatment of general "upkeep" activities is considered superior 
to the present "Priority" systems under which known minor Jobs are 
reviewed and classified in twelve categories. Many needs are unknown 
when the estimates are prepared, evidenced by requests for "Urgent and/or 
necessary unforeseen maintenance and repairs, based on past experience s. ,: 
As a result, these lists of small itemized requests in the present 
budget are meaningless. It would be an improvement to base all minor work 
of this nature on past experience and to control amounts budgeted through 
trend records in each of the suggested Work Programs. 

The relative urgency of maintenance Jobs can better be determined 
currently as a part of manpower work program scheduling, than through 
priorities frequently established over a year in advance. 



16 



For detailed recommendations and suggested forms refer to the 
Planning and Scheduling the Budget Change section.. 

SIZE OF BUDGET 

The proposed budget forms should be letter-size with nine columns 
instead of the present original document measuring 17 by 2k inches 
with twenty-nine columns. The number of lines needed to present 
Work Program figures instead of Objects of Expenditures figures will 
be reduced about seventy -five percent. 

The weight of the new summarized budget will be approximately 
one pound as compared to the one hundred thirty pounds for the present 
original and twenty -one pounds for the reduced version. (All budgets 
of the fourteen other cities and counties reviewed during this survey 
were produced on letter-size paper.) 

The net effect of these changes will be the production of a 
usable instrument for the administration and control of municipal 
expenditures. It will be convenient to handle, portable for office 
use and for committee discussions, and will fit into a briefcaee for 
home study, if desired. 

BUDSET RELATIONSHIPS — DEPARTMENT MANAGERS, MAYOR AMD BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 

To improve overall realization of budget objectives, changes are 
needed in the relationships now existing between the top echelons of 
city government. While authorization of the budget is properly legis- 
lative, the preparation, presentation, substantiation and administration 
of the budget are generally considered to be the responsibilities of 
the executive branch of the government, namely the Mayor. To retain to 
the greatest degree this division of responsibility, it is desirable 
that the following changes be made: 

1. The budget should be fully accepted as "The Mayor's Budget". 
He alone should be held accountable for results. 

2. The Mayor — or his immediate representative -- should attend 
all budget meetings of the Board or of the Finance Committee 
to explain and support the requests he ha a previously approved. 

3. The Board should advise the Mayor the reasons for their budget 
changes. In turn, the Mayor should forward this information 
to affected departments. 

These changes will improve budget consideration and will remove some of 
the general dissatisfaction with present procedures. 



17 






BUDGET HBLECAT^ON 

The present system involving special newspaper issues of 1he 
proposed budget and appropriation ordinances should be discontinued . 
The recommended Summarized Work Program budget, letter-size, will 
contain superior data and information for the public and should be 
reproduced in book or pamphlet form in sufficient quantities to permit 
widespread distribution to news media, libraries, schools, civic 
committees, associations and other groups . 

This printed budget should be based on the Mayor's recommendations 
to the Board of Supervisors. This will give interested citizens an 
opportunity to secure advance information about budget plans and to 
present their views to the Board of Supervisors. As changes made by 
that body nominally affect only a small fraction of the total budget 
items, such chaages might veil be considered newsworthy and be published 
as news items. This procedure will give better information to interested 
citizens, and at the same time reduce city expense. 

ADVAI BMSES OF WORK FR O SRAM BEIEGETZBS 

The advantages of a Work Program type budget are: 

1. It will give department heads and other at supervisory levels 
an improved management tool, encouraging them to think and 
act in terms of planning and accomplishment. It will provide 
incentives and increase employee interest. 

2. It will provide more meaningful information to the administra- 
tive and legislative branches of government. It will aid in 
policy formulation, development of extent and standards of 
service, priority of activities and authorization and control 
of expenditures. The reduction in size and content of the 
budget itself will improve the reviewing process and the 
quality of the decisions made. 

3» The value of Work Programs to the public is hardly calculable. 
It is axiomatic that a municipal government's effectiveness 
and efficiency is in direct ratio to the interest displayed 
by citizens. Work Program budgeting will permit and promote 
this interest, and for the first time it will make it possible 
for the interested citizen to know what services are now 
being purchased and their cost, as well as the nature and the 
price of plans for new activities and expansions in existing 
programs. 

"When budget information is presented in such a manner 
that citizens can understand it and discuss it intelligently, 
public hearings can be made an effective medium through waici 
taxpayers may express their opinions about proposed financial 
programs and policies." 



18 






It will permit, with safety, considerable decentralization 
of authority to lover levels of manag'Jiiient. Some studies 
show that delegation of budget responsibility is one of the 
most effective means of securing "Cost consciousness" among 
Supervisors o Participation in the budget process by super- 
visors can have far-reaching effects- It tends to make the 
thinking toward the budget positive rather than negative c 
It removes suspicions and misgivings. It fosters the idea 
that the budget is for management at all levels. 

The present procedure with Objects of Expenditures authorized 
by ordinance requires written approvals by the Chief 
Administrative Officer, Boards or Commissions and the Controller 
in order to make transfers between Objects of Expenditures 
even though the purpose for which the money is to be spent does 
not change o Such procedures cause much paper work which could 
be eliminated. 

5. It will sharpen decision making at all levels. 

60 It will greatly reduce the tremendous volume of detail necessary 
to itemize, describe and justify "line items." 

ESTABLISH A BTOBT DEPARTMBlgT 

It is recommended that an adequately staffed Budget Department 
be created. This department will be headed by a Budget Director 
reporting directly in a staff capacity to the Deputy Mayor. The primary 
responsibility of the Budget Department will be to maintain constant 
vigilance over all controllable costs of the city government through 
scheduled on- the -ground inspection of existing manpower, methods and 
all forms of expenses and through examination of proposed increases. 
Through this agency will be provided the necessary incentives to all 
departments for efficiency and economy. The Budget Department will 
design, install and co-ordinate the proposed Work Program budget, as 
only such specialized attention will produce maximum benefits. 

The establishment and staffing of the Budget Department are the 
first moves necessary to the adoption of Work Program budgeting. The 
proposed organisation of the Budget Department is illustrated in chart 
form in Exhibit £. Class titles and position descriptions for the 
Director and staff with duties, minimum qualification, etc. are shown 
in Exhibits 3 to 6, 

It will be noted that an adequately staffed Budget Depertment is 
recommended. To do the Job which must be done to design and install 
the Work Program budget, to correct the conditions described herein 
and to realize the potential economies in present operations, it is 
vital not only that the staff be competent but it be numerically 
sufficient to conduct complete on-the-ground examinations of the full 
scope of city activities on a scheduled basis preferably every two or, 
at least, every three years. 



X9 






The International City Managers Association suggests one such 
staff member for each 500 city employees, vhich ratio ire recommend. 
School employees and others not within the jurisdiction of the Mayor 
and Board of Supervisors should not he included in this ratio -- 
unless such analytical service is extended to such organizations. 
Business corporations have found it profitable to use a ratio of one 
staff member to each 200 employees. 

The recruitment, training and development of this staff must be 
done with great care and will, necessarily, consume considerable 
time before full effectiveness is realized. 

A primary responsibility of the new Budget Department should be 
to produce realistic budgeting. Work Program budgets should be 
prepared on a factual basis. A strong and consistent effort to create 
cost consciousness and develop proper incentives should be developed 
in the Budget Department and supported by the Mayor. This effort 
should include posters, letters, talks to department heads and employees, 
suggestion plans inviting ideas for improvements in operations, safety, 
etc., contests, awards, and other incentives, all aimed at development 
of cost-mindedness and a general desire to improve efficiency. 

A sustained effort should be made to eliminate inflation in 
departmental budget estimates. The spending of not needed budgeted 
amounts in order to insure the continuance of existing level of 
appropriations should be controlled. Examinations by and consultations 
with representatives of the Budget Department, through the year and 
particularly during budget preparation time, will generally provide the 
best assurance that regulations are observed, that requests are in 
order and, depending on availability of funds, will be approved . 

The Budget Department will be best equipped and organizationally 
positioned to undertake the implementation and installation of 
approved changes resulting from recommendations by the Mayor's 
Committee. Without interpretation, coordination and assistance by such 
an ageney many valuable sources of potential economy could easily be 
delayed or subverted. 



20 



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♦* 13 »- 



4-. -- O 



ths budget 

exhibit iii 

class title: budget director cods: 

characteristics of the class: 

Subject to top management approval, 1b responsible for Initiating, 
developing and coordinating programs, plans and policies with respect 
to budgets, organization, manpower, cost control, management and 
procedures of all departments of the City government vlthin the 
Mayor's Jurisdiction. 

Makes regular important contacts with top-level City officials; 
supervises subordinate personnel. 

EXAMPLES OF DUTIES: 

1. Supervises and approves design and improvement of budget form 
and procedures. Provides assistance and advice in budget preparation 
(respecting amounts requested, needed supporting material and 
explanation) . 

2. Supervises and approves work program classifications and 
statistics to improve their utility. 

3° Evaluates budget execution. 

U. Reviews and makes recommendations on capital improvements. 

5« Reviews and makes recommendations on supplements to budgets . 

6. Reviews and makes recommendations on administrative studies. 

7« Makes recommendations on the implementation of studies on 
operating expense, including manpower, classifications, compensations, 
motor and other equipment, space requirements, forms, work methods, 
work flow and other costs. 

8. Initiates and implements development of cost incentive 
activities. 

9« Reviews and makes recommendations on revenue potentialities. 

10. Reviews and makes recommendations on City organization 
structure, need for existing or additional departments, divisions, 
bureaus, etc., authority delegation, responsibility and communications. 

11. Coordinates with other departments such subjects as costs, 
systems and methods. 

12. Keeps abreast of improved procedures in other jurisdictions 
and initiates appropriate application in San Francisco. 

MINIMUM QUALIFICATIONS: 

Training and Experience : Requires completion of a four year 
college or university course, with a baccalaureate degree in public 
or business administration, accounting, finance or Industrial 
engineering. 

Requires ten years of progressively responsible experience in 
municipal finance and accounting, including experience in management 
end organizational problems at a responsible management level, or 
related equivalent experience in private industry, or an equivalent 
combination of training and experience. A master's degree in the 
specified major course work may be substituted for two years of the 
required experience. 



EXHIBIT ZZZ 

{cont'd) 
CLASS TITLE: BUDGET DIRECTOR CODE: 

Knowledge, Abilities and Ski 11b ; Requires comprehensive know- 
ledge of the principles and techniques of financial accounting, 
budgeting, administration and management, modern office methods and 
procedures, personnel management, the application of statistical 
methods to management problems „ 

Requires unusual ability to initiate, plan and analyse the study 
of complex management problems; ability to supervise and delegate 
to subordinate personnel; unusual ability to deal courteously and 
effectively with others at all levels in complex and controversial 
situations; unusual creative, initiative and analytical abilities. 



EXHIBIT IV 

CLASS TITLES SENXCR BUDGET ANALYST CODE: 

CHARACTER:' STICS OF THE CLASS: 

Hfc&er general administrative direction of Budget Director , 
supervises an 1 Analysis Group unit; providing technical and professional 
guidance and coordination for a major area of the work of the Budget 
Director's office, as assigned . Subject to Budget Director's 
general direction and approval, determines scope of study, assigns 
vork to subordinate personnel, reviews results and coordinates with 
other Analysis Groups. 

Makes studies and submits recommendations with respect to budgets, 
organization, manpower, cost control, management and procedures of 
assigned City departments and assists in budget development; prepara- 
tion and proeessingo Makes regular important contacts with City 
officials with respect to budgeting, administrative and management 
matters; supervises subordinate personnel; performs related duties as 
required by Budget Director. 

EXAMPLES OF DUTIES: (as assigned) 

1. Design and improve budget form and procedure. 

2. Establish work programs and statistics. 
3° Evaluate budget execution. 

k Make administrative studies. 

5» Analyze operating expense, including manpower, classifications, 
compensations, motor and other equipment, space, forms, work methods, 
work flow and other costs. Study need to fill vacated positions. 

6. Study and evaluate recommended capital improvements. 

7« Develops cost incentive activities. 

8. Assist and advise in budget preparation - (amounts requested, 
needed supporting material and explanation) . 

9° Review work programs and assist in improving utility. 
10. Analyze supplements to budgets. 
Ho Study revenue potentialities. 

12. Study City organization structure, need for existing or 
additional departments, divisions, bureaus, etc. 

13. Analyze authority delegation, responsibility and coir; .nications. 
lUo Coordinate cost, systems and methods subjects with other 

departments. 

15. Keep abreast of Improved procedures in other Jurisdictions 
and study for application in San Francisco.. 

MINIMUM QUALIFICATIOSS: 

Training and Experience : Requires completion of a four year college 
or university course, with a baccalaureate degree in public or business 
administration, accounting, finance or industrial engineering. 



T8& JSUUttBT 

EXHIBIT IV 

(cont'd) 
CLASS TITLE; SEN2CR BUDGET ANALYST CODE: 

Requires six years of progressively responsible experience in 
municipal finance and accounting! including experience in management 
and organisational problems at a responsible supervisory level, or 
related equivalent experience in private industry, or an equivalent 
combination of training and experience. A master's degree in the 
specified major course vork may be substitutes for two years of the 
required experience. 

Knowledge, Abilities and Skills : Requires thorough knowledge 
of the principles and techniques of financial accounting, budgeting, 
administration and management, modern office methods and procedures, 
the application of statistical methods to management problems. 

Requires ability to plan, assign and supervise the activities 
of subordinate personnel; to edit, revise and prepare clear and 
concise reports; to investigate and analyze complex administrative, 
management and budgeting problems; to work well and effectively with 
others. 

Recommended Selection Procedure : 

The examination will consist of two parts, weighted 50$ on written 
test and 50$ on personal interview. Only those candidates who 
qualify in the written test will be called for the personal interview. 
Candidates must earn a score of 70$ on each part of the examination 
in order to have their names appear on the eligible list. The personal 
interview will evaluate the background and personal qualifications of 
the candidates. Final selection will be made by the Budget Director 
from the three highest candidates on the eligible list. 

Recommended Salary Range : 

Recommended salary range for the calibre of personnel required for 
the position is $10,000 to $12,000 per year. 

PROMOTIVE LIKES : 

From : Budget Analyst 



THE BUDGET 
EXHIBIT V 

CLASS TITLE: BUDGET AFALfST CODE: 

CHARACTERISTICS OF THE CLASS: 

Under direction, is responsible for performing difficult and 
detailed technical and professional work in making independent 
studies and analyses with respect to budgets, organization, manpower, 
cost control, management and procedures of assigned City departments 
and assists in budget development, preparation and processing « Makes 
regular contacts with City officials with respect to budgeting, admin- 
istrative and management matters; may supervise the work of subordinate 
personnel; performs related duties as required. 

EXAMPLES OF DUTIES: 

1. Assists Senior Budget Analyst in developing work programs 
and work program statistics. 

2. Develops cost standards for various operations. 

3. Assists Senior Budget Analyst in study and evaluation of 
recommended capital improvements. 

U. Under general direction of Senior Budget Analyst, conducts 
studies of City organization structure, need for existing or additional 
departments, divisions, bureaus, etc. 

5« Assists Senior Budget Analyst generally in his duties, as 
directed. 

MINIMUM QUALIFICATIONS: 

Training and Experience : Requires completion of a four year college 
or university course, with a baccalaureate degree in public or business 
administration; accounting, finance or industrial engineering. 

Requires fours years of progressively responsible experience in 
municipal finance and accounting, including experience in management 
and organizational problems at a responsible level, or related equiva- 
lent experience in private industry, or an equivalent combination of 
training and experience. A master's degree in the specified major 
course work may be substituted for two years of the required experience = 

Knowledge, Abilities and Skills : Requires considerable knowledge 
of; the principles and techniques of financial accounting, budgeting, 
administration and management; knowledge of modem methods of personnel 
management, modern office methods and procedures, the application of 
statistical methods to management problems. 

Requires ability to investigate and analyze complex administrative 
and budgetary problems; to deal effectively, courteously and success- 
fully with City officials; to write clear and concise reports. 



EXHIBIT V 
(cont'd) 
CLASS T2TLE: BBflKET ANALI8T CODE: 

Recommended Selection Procedure : 

The examination will consist of two parts, weighted 50$ on 
written test and 50$ on personal interview,. Only those candidates 
who qualify in the written test will be called for the personal 
interview,. Candidates must earn a score of l&j> on each part of the 
examination in order to have their names appear on the eligible listo 
The personal interview will evaluate the background and personal 
qualifications of the candidates. Pinal selection will be made by the 
Budget Director from the three highest candidates on the eligible Ltstc 

Recommen ded Salary Range : $7,800 - $9,600 per year. 

PROMOTIVE LINES: 

To: Senior Budget Analyst 
From: Junior Budget Analyst 



THE! K5D33T 
EXHIBIT VI 

CLASS TITLE: JUNICR BUDGET ANALYST CODE: 

CHARACTERISTICS OF THE CLASS: 

Under supervision, assists with and performs routine technical 
and professional work involving studies and analyses vith respect to 
budgets, organization, manpower, cost control, management and proce- 
dures of City departments and assists in budget development, prepara- 
tion and processing. Makes regular contacts with personnel of various 
City departments; gathers and prepares financial and technical data in 
connection with such studies; performs related duties as required, 

EXAMPLES OP DOTIES: 

1. Gathers pertinent information for developing work programs. 

2. Develops organization and flow charts. 

3. Does field work in connection with management and operational 
studies. 

ho Assists assigned City departments in preparing budgets. 

5. Analyzes operating expense for developing operational cost 
standards. 

6. Assists Budget Analysts and Senior Budget Analysts generally 
in their duties as directed. 

MINIMUM QUALIFICATIONS: 

Training and Experience: Requires completion of a four year college 
cr university course, with a baccalaureate degree in public or business 
administration, accounting, finance or industrial engineering. 

Requires two years of experience in municipal finance and account- 
ing or related experience in private industry, or an equivalent combi- 
nation of training and experience. A master's degree in the specified 
major course work may be substituted for the two years of required 
experience. 

Knowledge, Abilities and Skills : Requires knowledge of the 
principles and techniques of financial accounting, budgeting, adminis- 
tration and management, personnel management, office methods and 
procedures, application of statistical methods. 

Requires ability to write clear and concise, routine reports, to 
meet and deal successfully with other people; requires analytical 
research ability. 



THE BUDGET 

EXHIBIT VZ 
(cont'd) 

CLASS TITLE: JmiGR BUD3ET ANALYST CODE: 

Recommended Selection Procedure : 

The examination will consist of two parts, weighted 50^ on written 
test and 50$ on personal interview. Only those candidates who qualify 
in the written test will be called for the personal interview,, 
Candidates must earn a score of 70$ on each part of the examination 
in order to have their names appear on the eligible list. The 
personal interview will evaluate the background and personal qualifi- 
cations of the candidates. Final selection will be made by the Budget 
Director from the three highest candidates on the eligible list. 

Recommended Salary Range: $6,000 — $7*200 per year. 

PROMOTIVE LINES: 

To: Budget Analyst 

From: Original Entrance Examination 



PLAHHZflB ABD SCaEDHLSBO 
THE B8JD6BT CSAB3B 

Page 
Design Forms and Procedures oo.oooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo 22 
Develop Departmental Work Programs and Install System. ooo.oooooo 23 
Provide Cost Accounting ■> o <> « o <> o o •> o <> o » <, o o „ « <, o » <■ => o * «. = o <, = , -, = • ■ 23 



21 



PLANNIH3 AMD SCHEDEfUHB 
TOE BUDGET CHANGE 

DES2BN FORMS AND PROCEDURES 

The Budget Director, in cooperation with the Controller, should 
design budget forms and develop the procedures . 

Studies developed no evidence of the existence in this country 
of an approved or generally accepted standard design or set of proce- 
dures for Work Program budgeting. Of the many city and county Work 
Program budgets examined during this survey, no two were alike . 
Conditions and problems vary, as do the concepts of the principals 
involved o Some suggestions are presented herein to demonstrate 
principles. The treatment favored herein is more similar to that 
followed in Detroit than to any other jurisdiction. It also conforms 
in principle to recent recommendations of the Few York State Commission 
on Governmental Operations of the City of New York. In this connection 
it is of interest to note that Work Program-type budgets (described 
as "Activity", "Performance", or "Functional" depending on variances 
in design or terminology) are in use in New York City, Philadelphia, 
Chicago, Detroit, Cincinnati, Buffalo, Los Angeles and San Diego. 
Studies of Work Program budgeting are planned or are in process in 
Oakland, Milwaukee, Baltimore and New Orleans. 

Some cities through activity budgeting have been able to reduce 
their number of object classifications to ten or twelve items, such as 
salaries and wages, utilities, rent, contracted maintenance and repairs, 
office supplies, gas, oil and grease, operating materials, small tools, 
fixed charges, other expense and capital outlay. Any control lost 
through reducing the details required is more than offset by the 
improved control gained in Work Program budgeting. 

It is a primary requisite that the budget forms be designed to 
permit most effective use by department managers, the Mayor, the Board 
of Supervisors end the general public. In the initial compilation, of 
any budget it is necessary to itemize expenses by Object of Expenditure, 
but because the tremendous volume of detail impedes administrative 
review, this data should neither be a part of nor should it accompany 
the Summarized Budget presented to the Mayor and Board of Sttpervisors. 

Only in this way will it be possible for busy executives and 
citizens to absorb and understand the purpose and Justification of 
the many and varied budget requests. 

At present the following detail is supplied, as applicable for 
each of 12^ budgeting units. 

Personal Services - 20 sub-segregations 
Contractual Services - 53 sub-segregations 
Material and Supplies - 3*4- sub-segregations 
Equipment - each item is detailed. 



22 



I'JUS U ;^J^ ! : 



Exhibits 7> 8 and 9 are suggested work sheets for Work Program 
budgeting o Exhibits 10, 11 end 12 are summary forms for administrative 
use. The recapitulation from work sheets to summarized forms should 
be done on tabulating equipment. 

Punched cards should also produce such Object of Expenditure data 
as may be required for Civil Service purposes, allotments, encumbrance 
or fund control. 

An effort should be made to simplify control procedures by 
appropriating funds for each Work Program and using these appropria- 
tions for apportionment during the year and against which all types 
of encumbering charges should be entered. This process would greatly 
reduce the number of ledger accounts now carried and simplify the 
accounting work to be done. 

DEVELOP DEPARTMENTAL WORK PROSRAMS AND IHSTALL SYSTEM 

A Work Program is an Important, distinct and separable part of 
the total activity of a department, bureau or division. It should be 
sufficiently large to warrant separate budget treatment and to 
justify cost accounting segregation. It should be headed by the 
individual responsible for accomplishment of the end result. 

Work Programs should be developed in a manner to assure uniformity 
in design and to accomplish the most informative segregations with 
the least cost. At the time the Work Programs are determined, agree- 
ment should also be reached on the supporting statistics needed and 
the general types and volume of descriptive material to be sub ritted 
in justification of changes. 

The magnitude of the proposed change from Object of Expenditure 
to Work Program budgeting should not be underestimated. The Budget 
Department staff will have to be selected and trained. Much 
research, experimental and educational work wi.H have to be done to 
effect the transition without loss of expenditure control. Departments 
should be converted only with the assistance of the experienced 
analysts of the Budget Department, with the change-over completed 
within two to five years. 

It is recommended that installation be phased progressively, to 
work out problems as they develop. During the early stages of this 
program it may be necessary to operate both systems. 

PROVIDE COST ACCOWTIIB 

A parallel cost accounting procedure should be established to 
compare actual expenditures for each Work Program with approved 
budgets and to provide information to management for control purposes. 



23 






CONTROLLER 



juOofc^ PRot>fc.An Pro vide Tabulating Services ... 



.\*jp Ho^btiL _.„ loo5 



CODG 



1TW 



_lll_ 

120 



Perma nent Salaries 
Overtime 



Temporary Salaries 



pcMototeAfc 

A.CTUM. 



k 



52JM 



216.528 






227.031 



— 6o/_6l_ 



215.696 



rtfcyg FISCAL. Vb'ftk 
_W62_ 



__6 

1,2^0 
690 






7 

1,256 
690 



202_ 
__2i"8_ 
_232_ 

233. 

2"3U 

"21a" 



Freight & Misc. Ch a rges 



Mtcd.& Rep, Off ice Equipment 



Tele phone & Telegraph 



Posta ge 



Printing, Bookbi nding, etc. 
Rental of Equipment. 



95o 

3^0 
1,100 



300 



17610 



H 



1.0 00 

32X 

J*7Q0 
,1,815" 



J)00_ 



ihm 



1,000 

32? 

1^700 



TO 



i,i5o~ 

35q_ 

_U00_ 

2,000 

5t1W 



-300 
-*l5o™ 

~2'r~ 



185~ 



3,768" 



J71 
375" 



Stationery Office Su p plies 



11,700 



~5o 



11,500 



H750 



~5o" 



12,00 



5o" 



5oo 



Stationery Withdrawals 



30 



EXHIBIT 7 

All sample entries 
are hypothetical 



\J6RK PR0«2Art_T0TM&_.. $ 



281,U33 



297,679 



-MORfc ?R0QRArt 5TAT15TICS 



.Number of perm a nent City employees 
Number of warrants issued 






20,85h 
99Q,QQQ 



3l6,3M 
ACTUAL 



M£3$_ 



96q,QQQ 



320,972 
21^,056 



^62.^QQQ_ 



23,293 

FSTU'teTeD 
—61762.^ 
_2l,_856_ 
S2&,QQ0 . . 



P Ot?F jSVpUhHATtgH Or^AA30 MNCB.E<V->CS AHb t)CCfi£A^E4 SHotOH IM CALUMH 9 - 

^CL__[^17,025.re.flects...increaseB_iiuiijandar_Sec*_JX.Salary„^^ 

the addition of one BID Ar.r.t . TTT a nd two B3"10 Tah Mach Operators approved by 

Ord ._12r.6l_nece ssitated by establis hing a shift b asis for handlin g thn e xpanded T 
ocial Security Program 



-111- 




Si, 2^0 overtime estimated necessary during bud get revision 

$690 Temporary salaries needed during budg et revision 

$l50_due_to^igh9.r_cx)^jLJter_^xi^tiiig-^erjcLcej 



$l85_due_^^ighejij^jL£Q^ 

1,7 68 reflects increase in rental rate 
by . expandeji_Sacial_S_e^.urxty_£rograjiL 



iahiaaiing_equiF 



:&ssitated_ 



Program_ 



$500 increase for tab cards and forms necessitated by e ? 



SefiuEit 



Grts tie. «LAi_-t4 A »A A t? £ k. 



CONTROLLER 



l&fuCPftog.fcAh'* .Capital Outlay — (Provide Tabulating 



CftP\TALOWUV PETML 

WP 100^) 
Services— \A? Ui)hh»>i--£ 2Q0G 



p&E_ 


EftOlPrtErtT ^vVtoRK PR03ECT1 


OP. 


dovr 

JH<UOOIM<> 
jHtfHLATlOH 


evwrt&reo 
VAv-oes 


6l/62 
HeTPrtOtMT 


fiertp 

rtuti 
CM*) 




/ 


z 


3 


4- 


5" 


£ 


» 




EQUIPMENT MM RR.P 












h02 


P sture Chair 


1 


1 




Lo6U_ 


So 


10 


Lo 


i 


"1 

1 


402 


Posture Chair 


.. .. 
1 




1*065 


50 


10 


Lo 


i 


102 


Po 
Po 


sture Chair 


1+066 


50 


10 


ho 


i 


1+02 


sture Chair 


k088 


5o 


10 


ho 




102 


Posture Chair 


U08? 


_5o 


10 


liO 


ML 


1 

1 


+02 


Po 

Po 


sture Chair j 


i ; ll090 


So 


10 


l+o 


1 


102 


sture Chair 


ii091 


>o 


10 


LO 


1 




. . . .. . . . . 














: , , ! , 














' ■ ' ' ; M 1 1 1 111 M 













































































— 







































































EXHIBIT 8 

All sample entries 

are hypothetical 

1 t 









































































, . . 






















. 


: — 











— ■ 





























CAPITAL 6DTUY WfcU ..$ 


lid 


350 


70_ 


280 


• 


»c 


eyPLAH^iot^ 6Fp.^pLf,cene-HTS *md Juvhrcatum of- hiSio itcm* fl«.P^oaecr4- 


' 


Po sture chairs are to replace old style swivel chairs with til tine and swivel 


j- 


.JiaciifinjUroe_w^rjiJ3eyjjn5La_pQint_Q 


£_ practicable repair. 










i 




> 


' i II Ml II i MM '• ' ' 


> 


,|| | ... , | 




i i M i 1 h ! Ill 


i 1 


li l|lji| i j! 


|j M IIIM 


1 


: 1 MM 1 M 1 II 


1 | j 


MM 


» 


: , i! | | 


, 1 I | 1 


|l ' li 


' 


MM Mil 


Ml Iii 


1 Mi 








) 


. | M|j i > . 1 M i I ! i | 1 




'. 


^ ,'. .. 1 llllllll 








IIIM 1 II Mill 


1 




• 1 1 1 




1 Ill-Ill 










-1 


MM 


i 










nil 






! M ; ! UJ Ih 


::±n 






tbtiuii 


■bJb 


MACUKpCft. I 






1 











| 


i 1 
1 


mi 


MM- - 






XQKTJiOLLER. 



PBMMianSftLAeiKDElML 



fRflC.pf-.tl Provide Ta bulati ng Serylca a- 



.W tAm^cP. 1005 



16- 



hr 



C\V\L 

Class 



B_L 



R_j6_ 



U8-B-10. 




50UBJL 



51 



B.210_ 



52-_B_222, 



B_23 
B_JO 
£_309 



56~EL310_ 



5Z, 

5a 



B.31Q1. -Sr a_I.ah._Macii^_Dper ,_IKL 
B_5l2_ 



h h 



uper-Vising -Accountant 

-Office Assistant 

eneral. Clerk 

eacLClerk — 



8 LCalculating.-Mach.--Qpar-*- 

_Key_Punch. OpQr.».-IBK 

_Iab..Machine .Oper. IBML 



CWASS tltU 



Mo.of 

l Mpu. 



UQ PEKMANENT SAT.ARTF.fi 

.Accountant I 



Accountant_II- 



Accountant -HI 

Jenior.-Accountant- 



.Gfinaral gUudcJEypiatu, 



ftu\)C£T fy -£oJ&iH? r .ftu^ ii" rv 



tAOM 



PsME 



7 



11*7-51*3— 

.530-6I4I— 

.613-71*5— 

-728-83U-— 

-862-10U7— 

.268-325— 

JlO-lilS— 

-518-628. 

-3Ul-l*l5- 

-333-1*05- 

.358*1*36, 

.1*5&=556- 



OF 

EMPL 

<9 



JltUJOSL 



MOW 

9 




J2,2C5- 
-l5,l*56_ 

-25,1*31- 

-20,796- 

JL2,56U. 

-3,570- 

_9,5H- 
-7,536_ 
»9,7U0_ 

_2 8,791*. 

-1*0,752. 

-12*321. 



-1*,2BQ_ 



EXHIBIT 9 

Al l sample entries 
are hypothetical 



i±z 



* WVHENT <$ALb£\£S TOTALS 



37 



37 



l*o 



21*14,056 



P <H 
O 
C0 CO 

B 



5 



«H <0 
P 

-P XI 

" pi 

o 

o n 
n) -P 

c 

w gj 
c 6 

■P c3 
q a, 

■rl CO 



W 
XJX! 

c 



U CO 

> 



■o a 

ll 
p 



XI 

M-P 
C V] 





o o • 

O -H CO 

co w o 

h .h a, 

O 3 CO 

^ O* *-< 
p y 
c o-H 



■C tiO.H 

O C P 

^•H cfl 

. P P 

I- o w 

Ci CO 

ij_ a a) 




•*H 



t "* 

\ 



a 



q. o 



"SHf 



co H 

CO XI 

14. 

p p 



(J 10 



3 



o w 



-A\ 



t-^A 



3 



»S> 



f 

E>INDlN<> MARGIN 

_A 





£7 



1 

I— 

>■ 



IP 
09 



•Vi 

® ■ 

— , 






; 1 



r- 



t>iM 



J$ 



2 



8 



5 



EH 



O 



<*- v» 



3 



W 



f 



R: 






■ . .. 



SAVDBS 



2k 



TiiLi BUBBBT 



SAVINGS 

A survey of the tine spent by ell departments (except School} 
in preparing and assembling the annual budget, produced a total of 
65,000 man-hours, involving a labor cost of $260,000; to this is 
added - publishing in newspaper $30*000; printing and reproduction 
$11,000; total preparation cost $301, 000 <> 

An additional 73,800 hours, costing $29^,000, vere estimated to 
have been spent in the use of the budget, comparing it with the 
expenditures and preparing transfer and supplementary requests . 

As the time spent in Work Program budgeting, it is estimated, 
will be offset by reduction in the Object of Expenditure detail 
needed, no material change in cost of preparation is anticipated „ 

The effect of the Work Program budget plan, as a whole, includ- 
ing the scheduled surveying of existing costs and previewing of 
budget requests by Budget Department analysts, will uncover savings 
of very substantial proportions . Based on the results of pilot- type 
studies of the city organizations made by this Committee, it is 
estimated that an annual saving of five percent of the total budget 
(other than that of the School Department) can be made, resulting 
in a reduction of approximately $10,000,000 annually. 

(in a private corporation, with similar findings, it would not 
be difficult to realize a ten percent saving, but the lower figure of 
five percent is used here because part of the potential economies 
have already been developed elsewhere in the Committee's report 
and because conditions within municipal governments limit full 
realization of potential economies. Many "pressure groups", 
department and bureau heads and others motivated by special interests, 
can be expected to resist reductions. It should be pointed out that, 
in many instances, these same groups were responsible for initiating 
and creating the financial problems and excesses which now exist. 
However, with full administrative support, savings may greatly exceed 
this five percent estimate.) 



25 



A 

REPORT 

WITH RECOMMENDATIONS 

CONCERNING THE ACTIVITIES 

OP THE CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION 

OF THE CITY AND COUNTY 

0" SAN FRANCISCO 



BY TEE 
WAGE & SALARY ADMINISTRATION 
TASK FORCE OF THE MAYOR'S 
COMMITTEE FOR MUNICIPAL MANAGEMENT 



MAY 1961 



LETTER OF SUBMITTAL 

May, 1961 

Marshall G. Mustain 

Project Director 

Mayor's Committee for Municipal Management 

San Francisco, California 

Dear Mr. Mustains 

The Wage and Salary Administration Task Force has completed an 
intensive five-month study of San Francisco civil service policies 
and practices,, We believe the attached report will reveal signifi- 
cant areas for improvement,, 

The conclusions and recommendations contained therein are the 
result of study and debate by the Task Force and its Advisory Com- 
mittee composed of experts in the salary administration field and of 
advice and counsel from other Task Forces which relayed to us the 
effects of current civil service practices on the operating depart- 
ments contacted,, In addition, we- interviewed manageaient officials of 
several major city departments; discussed our findings with city 
employees; attended each meeting of the Civil Service Commission 
during four months; studied Grand Jury reports, writings of leading 
authorities, union and other employee association newsletters; and 
analyzed the results of studies made by citizen groups in other 
public jurisdictions in aa attempt to develop reasons for a strengthen- 
ing of San Francisco's policies and practices in this field. 

We believe therefore that this report is authoritative and factual. 

It is the conclusion of most students of the civil service system 
that its role of reducing political patronage as a factor in billing 
jobs has been largely accomplished. The Task Force agrees with this 
conclusion as far as San Francisco is concerned. The trend of changes 
in the administration of its civil service system has in recent years 
been in the right direction. As a result, San Francisco is better 
equipped to deal with its current problems than it would have been, 
had not the improvements taken place. However, much more progress is 
necessary if a positive personnel program is to be developed,, 

The improvements we feel are necessary to accomplish this are the 
subject of this Task Force's report. 

May we take this opportunity to express our appreciation for the 
excellent cooperation received from the Civil Service Commission-, its 
otaff, and other city employees in making available to us, freely and 
without hesitation whatever information was requested. 

Co J. Bocchieri 
Chairman 






Summary 

FINDINGS 

Present Civil Service System 9 

L of Present Civil Service System III 

jECCISENDATIOi;.. HAriTER HL7 ISI0K 

Norn 

KiMEMDATIOHS . R REVISION 

/^commendations on Wage and Salary Administration 25> 

VI P^co!. 'i-ndations on Reorganization of the Civil 
ice Function 



Savings 






INDEX OF EXHIBITS 



EXHIBIT 
SECTION HO. TITLE 



I I Organization Chart 

Present Civil Service,. ■><,oo...ooeo«oo 

II II Count of Unfilled Permanent Positions 

II-A Count of Unfilled Temporary Positions 

III Illustration of Use of Various 

Appointment Categories »„.o.<... • • • • • 

IV Comparison of Trade & Craft 

■Ka OeS OX iray» .o.ooo.ooooQ.oaoocooo. 

V Comparison of Miscellaenous Employees 

RatSeS OX ray » o«..o«oo.o.«o«.o.*.«.o 

VI Type and Frequency of Matters considered 
By The Civil Service Commission,, . '• « 

III VII Salary Plan for Clerical & Technical 
Family of Jo"o6 „ .....ao. 

i^XampJLe A oo«o.*o.o«ooo.o»«o.o 
iitampie Do .ooooojooco..«goo o o c 

VIII Salary Plan for Maragement 

Professional Family of Johs „ , <, « . o « «. 

rJ3C&?ftpxC L*o»ooeoc>QOo»ooooooo«90 

IX Salary Plan for Trades & Crafts 

£ SX3iiy OX i/OD3 ooc»»ecoaooooooo«ooo« 
E3C3SipX@ Dooi»M«*«oeo»ot040MO 

Example 3 s ««o««o»*o»o«» • • 

£*X3TBp JJ& i?oo6»«ooooo*o*o*«o » • e o 

X Salary Plan for Police & Firemen. .... 
XI Salary Plan for Streetcar & Bus 

OpC!T3XO?8 »coo«ooeoo«cooooooooo***oo 

IV XII Organisation Chart 

Proposed Personnel Department C6 ..o. 



WABI 



SUMMARY 






SUMMARY 



The Wage and Salary Administration Task Force was charged with the 
responsibility of reviewing and evaluating San Francisco wage and salary 
policies, procedures, and administration, and with recommending action 
to simplify, streamline, and effect economies in this activity. 

The over-all project was divided into two major objectives: (1) 
to develop a better system for determining the compensation of city 
employees and (2) to reorganize present activities and provide for new 
activities which would improve procedures for recruiting, developing, 
placing, promoting, and retaining employees 

SALARY ADMINISTRATION 

As is general with any industry, a basic philosophy has to be adopted 
so as to define the city's competition in the labor market,, Ue believe 
the City and County of San Francisco should compete with all other em- 
ployers of equivalent stature* 

In the non-management level, the majority of city jobs are very 
similar to those in local private industry,. It is also apparent that 
many jobs in city service, particularly at the management level, are 
unique to public jurisdictions and therefore have little or no com- 
parability in private employment. 

As a result of this thinking, we adopted two basic principles: (1) 
for non-management jobs the city employees' earnings should equal the 
earnings of employees in local private industry whenever possible and 
(2) for management jobs, the rates of pay should equal the rates ■ of other 
public Jurisdictions, except possibly those in the professional ranks 
where private employment data is more comparableo 

All city jobs were grouped into "families," i.e., jobs with the 
same general characteristics, and our basic principles were appliecl to 
each "family" with the following results: 

Clerical s.nd Technical : The result of equating earnings of city 
employees with the earnings of employees in private industry would 
save $4,000, 000 o 

Trades and Crafts : The result of a similar equation of pay would 
save $2,500,000 o 

Manlcipal Railway Operators : The result of equating earnings with 
similar jobs in the larger California cities would save $500,000. 

Police and Firemen: The result of equating earnings of San Fran- 
cisco ©sjployees with earnings cf similar jobs in other California 
jurisdictions would sev« $800,000,, 






Manageme nt g Rate6 for these jobs should genera3.1y he equated to 
those of other public jurisdictions » No estimate of savings could be 
made because available earnings data was inconclusive. 

CBCAHIZATIOH OF A PERSOKHEL DBPARTMBHT 

In this phase of our study, our basic philosophy was that person- 
nel administration should be an active and integral part of top 
management. Our goal therefore, was to provide the machinery for 
developing over-all personnel policies and for giving direction and 
guidance to sound personnel administration practices in the operating 
departments . 

In order to implement this goal, our proposal establishes a 
Personnel Department which would act in a staff capacity to top 
management. 

In addition to Wage and Salary Administration, this department's 
major function is to keep abreast of the broad personnel activities of 
the city-county government. It is to act as spokesman for management 
on personnel problems. It should perform the necessary objective 
research and recommend establishment of broad personnel programs. 
Records and reports of the current status of the total force of city 
employees are to be maintained to provide top management with facts 
and trends. And it should be continually aware of the status of 
employee morale, reporting to management any problems which would 
adversely affect good morale. 

The intangible nature of the results to be obtained by organizing 
a Personnel Department does not lend itself to estimating in dollars 
whatever savings are achieved. However, a sound personnel program 
will be the basis for employee good will and enthusiasm, and will 
create a spirit of cooperation that can save the city substantial 
suras in greater efficiency and work production. 

CCffCLOSIOBS 

Based on the philosophies stated above, the Task Force's 
conclusions can be summarized in four major recommendations i 

1. The city should pay salaries based on the average earnings 
for like positions in San Francisco industry or, when positions are 
unique to the public service, in other comparable public jurisdictions 
in California. 

Our studies reveal that average earnings of city employees are 
sonewhat higher than the average earnings of industry for comparsV 
positions. The principal causes arei The method of interpreting the 
"generally prevailing rate, " the archaic practice of basing salaries 
for individual positions on data obtained in surveying each of the 
city jobs, and the basically different pay policies for major groups 
of employees o Our proposal is to apply one fundamental policy to all 
families of city-county jobs. 






2o The procedure for recruiting employees should be faster a: 
more flexible 

The present system assumes that there Is an abundant supply of 
applicants, eager for city service and available for employment at 
the city's convenience . Our study indicates that this system has 
proved unreliable and unsuccessful. Instead of waiting for applicants 
to "sign up", the city should pursue a vigorous program of procurement 
and should amend its rules to permit use of Judgment in measuring the 
qualifications of applicants 

3. A planned end purposeful program to develop future management 
employees is essential if the city is to continue giving the best 
service possible to its residents., 

Under the lack of any systematized program for development of 
management personnel, the career city employee must take steps on his 
ovn to solve the problem of progression. He must decide which jobs he 
thinks he can fill, then watch for and take the promotional examinations . 
Rather, the city should accept the responsibility of insuring that the 
right man is assigned to the right job at each step of the promotional 
ladder so that the top administrative jobs can be filled by well-trained, 
highly qualified individuals, 

h» An employee relations program is needed to develop in each 
city employee a feeling of identification with top management in 
administering the city's affairs. 

The present organizational concept of city government restricts 
top management's knowledge of the individual employee and of his 
collective feeling about his employer, the taxpayers „ Organizing a 
Personnel Department which will be actively interested in the 
employee's viewpoint will overcome this important deficiency. Ouep 
proposal on this point is to provide channels of communication to 
permit exchange of viewpoints betveen top management and the employee. 
We believe this will result in a better understanding by the employee 
of over-all management policies and goals, thus making a vital 
contribution to the unity of purpose necessary for successful city 
government. 



WAGE 



It is recognized that implementing each of these i*ecommendat.\> 
would be a major undertaking requiring several years before being made 
effective o We are also keenly conscious that these activities are 
closely inter -related o Because it will take a great deal of effort 
and time to establish an over-all personnel program we recommend that 
the Wage and Salary Administration proposal be implemented first* 
This activity is basic and must precede the others in developing the 
overall program. 



Wage and Salary Administration Task Foree 

Co Jo Bccchieri, Chairman 
Homer Ho Starr 



Advisory Committee on Wage 8s Selary Administration 
(Deliberations confined to salary administration) 



Ro So Hunsinger 
Harry McKnight 
Jo Eo Hewstrom 
Seorge Treat 
W. R. Willard 



Research Analyst 
Raymond A» Belinge 






PRE S E NT 
CIVIL SERVICE SYSTEM 

A BRIEF HISTORY OF THE SYSTEM IN SAN FRANCISCO 
FROM I85O TO THE PRESENT o 

A SUMMARY OF THE RESPCHSZBIL2TiES AND ACTIVITIES 
OF THE CIVIL SERVICE CC&©E5SI0N AND STAFF AS CURRENTLY 
CONSTITUTED o 



FRESEIS2 CIVIL SERVICE SYSTEM 



In the early days of San Prancisco Government, the Vigilance 
Committee was instrumental in having the Consolidation Act of 1856 
adopted to curtail extravagance in city government and to restrict 
the effects of a spoils system out of which came payroll padding, 
contract graft, bribery, straight-out embezzlement, and position grafto 

On May 26, 1898 a new City Charter was adopted. Among other 
things it required that certain positions be brought under a civil 
service system that would eliminate political patronage as the influ- 
encing factor in selection of employees for the positions in question.* 
Essentially, the controls provided by this system weres 

1 - Open, competitive examinations for selection of employees, 

2 - limitation of the power of political office holders to 

remove or dismiss employees. 

3 - Elimination of the practice of assessments on the 

incumbents for political funds. 



In 1931, the present charter was adopted. It extended civil 
service to all city jobs exempting only a small number of specific 
positions. It also centralized wage and salary administration by 
making mandatory upon the Board of Supervisors the standardization of 
compensation. The effect was that the city's department heeds could 
no longer pay salaries as they chose for jobs in their departments c 
Under this centralized function, jobs doing like work would get like 
pay, regardless of which department the work was performed in. 

Working under the provisions of the 1931 charter, the city has 
established a civil service system that essentially provides for; 
(l) a 3-raan commission and staff independent of other city departments 
to administer civil service, (2) selection of employees by open 
examination, (3) a probationary period before permanent assignment to 
a position, (h) prohibition from political activity. 

Civil Service Commission 

The Coimnission is composed of 3 members, appointed Toy the Mayor 
for a terra of six years, with a new appointment every two years. It 
is responsible for providing qualified persons for city service based 
on merit and fitness. The Commission is the city's employment and 
personnel department and adopts rules and regulations to govern 
applications, examinations, eligibility for assignment, transfers, 
promotions, resignations, reduction in force, the filling of positions, 
and other similar matters. 



10 






general Manager, Personnel 

A General Manager, Personnel has been appointed by the Civil 
Service Commission to perform the duties of executive officer of the 
Civil Service System. He holds office at the pleasure of the 
Commission, and supervises the activities of a staff of 56 employees 
engaged in classification and salary administration, recruitment and 
examinations, and other in-service activities. 

The organization of this department is depicted on the chart 
labeled Exhibit !., 

Positions 

Positions are created \-rith the approval of the Board of Supervisors, 
Before any position is filled, however, the Civil Service Commission 
assigns the proper designation and classification. The Commission 
classifies all positions, unless specifically exempted by charter, in 
accordance with duties and responsibilities, and training and experience 
required. 

Examinations of Applicants 

Entrance — Generally, entrance examinations require that the applicant 
be a resident of San Francisco for one year. For a certain few 
entrance Jobs this prior residence requirement has been waived by the 
Board of Supervisors. 

Promotional — Generally, promotional examinations may be taken only by 
those already in city service vith the additional requirement that their 
prior city experience must have been in certain Jobs as determined bj 
the Civil Service Commission. 

Fi lling Vacancie s 

As a result of the examinations, a list of eligibles is compiled 
and ranked in order of examination scores, with the person receiving the 
highest score at the top of the list. VThenever a position is to be 
filled, the Department Head submits a requisition to the Civil Service 
Commission. The Commission thereupon certifies the name of the person 
standing highest on the list. The department must accept this part 
and appoint him to the open position. The appointee has a six month 
probationary period. At any time during the probationary period, i. 
department head may terminate the appointment upon written notice. 

Salary Administration 

Acting en the recommendations of the Civil Service Commission, the 
Board of Supervisors has final authority on the amounts to be paid city 
employees „ 



11 



The following breakdown is current for the approximately 21,000 
employees paid by taxes collected from San Francisco taxpayers: 

U,000 - employees excluded from city salary administration 
by the charter (teachers and other technical employees of 
the school department, employees of Steinhart Aquarium, 
lav library departments, and certain others) » 

2,200 - organized trades or crafts employees «, 

2,000 - municipal railvay platform personnel <, 

3,300 - police and firemen© 

9,*iO0 - miscellaneous employees, mostly office positions «. 



The proposed schedules of compensation are recommended by the 
Civil Service Commission on the basis of facts and data obtained in a 
comprehensive salary survey <, The Commission publishes its findings 
as to vhat is the generally prevailing rate of pay for each job 
classification and recommends a rate of pay for each job in accordance 
with the data obtained o 

The salary survey is to be made every 5 years except whenever in 
the judgment of the Civil Service Commission or the Board of Supervisors 
it is believed economic conditions warrant a survey being made more 
often » In recent years a survey has been made annually <, 

Suspensions and Dismissals 

The charter provides that a permanent employee shall not be 
removed or discharged except fcr cause, upon written charges, and 
after an opportunity to be heard in his own defense 

The department head conducts a public hearing end may exonerate, 
suspend, or dismiss the employee 

The employee may appeal, in writing, to the Civil Service 
Commission. The Commission examines the case and makes such decision 
as it believes is just, including over -ruling the Department Eeado 

If the employee does not want to accept the decision of the Civil 
Service Commission, he may go to the courts. 

For disciplinary purposes, the Department Head may suspend an 
employee for a period not over 30 days, resulting in a loss of salary 
for the term of the suspension© 



12 



P ayroll 

While all employees are paid by warrants or pay checks issued 
by the Controller, the charter requires that the Civil Service 
Commission examine and approve the payroll for the legal existence of 
the positions shown and for the correctness of the rate of pay<, 

Performance Rating of Employees 

An Employees Evaluation-Development plan has recently been 
initiated and is still in the experimental stages « It requires that 
employees be counselled four times by their supervisor during the 
probationary period « This is done with the expressed purpose of 
aiding the employee to develop himself. It also provides a written 
appraisal of the employee's performance and thus can be used to 
support termination of the employee before the probationary period 
is over. 

Training 

A formal training program is currently limited to the Employee 
Evaluation -Development plan designed to train supervisors in 
correctly and consistently rating their probationary employees 



13 



EXHIBIT I 




WAGE & SALARY 



II 

APPRA ISAL OP PRESEHI 
CIVIL SERVICE SYSTEM 

PAGE 

POSITXOHS ........... o 15 

FILLING VACANCIES ............... l6 

WAGE & SALARY ABMINI3TRATICN ..... 19 

SUSPENSION & DISMISSALSo .*..*. . ..... 23 

PAYROLL 23 

PERFORMANCE RATING.... .. *....... 23 

TRAINING ..< 23 

CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION ........... 24 

C0M2OJNICATION....... . , 2h 

EXHIBITS II TO VI........... 



Ik 



WAGE & SALARY 



Ho AMKAISAL OP PRESENT CIVIL SERVICE SYSTEM 



Positions 

In i960, the city contracted at a cost of $4U,000 the services of 
Jo Lo Jacobs fis Company to provide up-to-date job classes (class speci- 
fications) for all city jobs,, This was completed in December i960 and 
civil service is now in the process of assigning the new job titles to 
all employees o It is our understanding that this complete survey was 
the first one made in some 30 years o 

That a complete survey was needed is shown by these statistics? 



Year 



19*10 
I960 

# of increase 



Civil Service 

10178 
17183 

6836 



Job Classes 

71^ 
932 

31* 



While we recognise that part of the growth in the number of em- 
ployees can be attributed to the population expansion of present job 
classes, we can also deduce from the statistics that many new employees 
were assigned existing job classes rather than providing new ones 

We are unable to estimate or judge how many misclassifications 
exist in city service but an indication can be obtained from the 
following illustrations 



Chauffeur 



tfbtor Equipment Operator 

Eeavy Equipment Operator 

light Motor Equipment Operator 

Caretaker 

Gardener 

Chauffeur (passenger cars) 



General Clerk 



Fayroll Audit Clerk 

Fare Collection Cashier 

junior Clerk 

Clerk-Typist 

Personnel Clerk 

Tabulating Machine Operator 

Storekeeper 

Senior Clerk-Typist 

Taller 



Head Nurse 



Supervising Nurss 

Central Supply Room Supervisor 

Assistant Director of Nurses 



15 



&ARY 



Misclassif ic&ticns may result in either over-paying or under-paying 
the employees affected for the work they are performing,, Accurate c' 
specifications are the ba3is for promotions and for- salary administration,, 
It is imperative that they "be kept current,, 

It is our understanding that the most important reason for the 
city's situation is that the civil service staff has had only one job 
analyst for many years. The task of maintaining class specifications 
in current condition as well as writing new ones as new Jobs are created, 
is an impossible task for one man, considering the size of the city's 
operation* Four job analysts vere trained by working with the Jacobs 
Company experts and should in the future provide sufficient help to 
maintain class specifications in current condition,, 

FilJing vacanc ies by recruitment or promotion 

The foundation for the Civil Service system is open competition fcr 
jobs. This competition presumably results in selection of the most 
qualified candidate for the job. It essentially is comprised of % 

1, Public announcement of openings o 

2 Examinations open to all qualified, citizens,, 

3o Closed registers fixing the list of eligibles determined 
by the examination, 

k 9 Appointment from the top name of the register of eligibles. 

This field is one of the most complex in the Civil Service and 
should be studied at greater length than was done in the time allotted 
to the Task Force Its importance to the success of city management is 
unquestioned,. One need only consider that if able men are not recruited 
to the city service, the remaining staffing processes will consist only 
of shuffling the mediocre around 

Our study leads us to make some genertrl comments and recommendations 
which we believe can be implemented under the leadership of a Personnel 
Director working directly under the administrative head of the city. 

First, the city"s method of announcing examinations is to post the 
announcement in public buildings and to circularize a list of organiza- 
tions that might be in a position to have, or know of, applicants. In 
some cases, a limited advertising budget permits newspaper ads Thi3 
method is impersonal and unimaginative and cannot be expected to be 
completely effective in attracting applicants, 

Second s the residence rule, unless specifically waived by the Board 
of Supervisors, restricts recruitment efforts at universities where the 
most likely candidates ore to be found for professional positions,, St 
also precludes the hiring of newly arrived inhabitants. 



i£ 






Third, the examination process does not assure that the most quali- 
fied men will set the job„ 

Because the examination process is designed to negate patronage- 
type appointments, special emphasis has bee:i placed on formal select lot) 
procedureso For instance, in San Francisco the "rule of one" applies, 
i c e», when a requisition is received from a departinfint, the civil ser- 
vice certifies to the department the top naae on the eligible list and 
the department head is required to appoint the individual named,, This 
method would be proper if the testing program can be relied upon to be 
perfectly valido While there have undoubtedly been important advances 
toward perfecting tests, including introducing oral boards as pert of 
the testing procedure, reliability is still doubted, particularly in 
the areas of such factors a3 ability to get along with fellow workers, 
initiative, enthusiasm, ability to supervise, and ability to administer 

Further it has been stated that about 52$ of the persons passing 
examinations waive their rights It is reasonable to assume that a 
great mmiber of these take the examination only for experience so that 
they will be better prepared for job3 they are really interested in 
Because the "practice" in taking examinations leads to proficiency in 
answering questions it is often likely that when one of these persons 
finally accepts an appointment, he may not be the most qualified candi- 
date, but the best examination taker* 

Also the present system requires almost four months between the 
examination announcement and the certification of the top eligible for 
appointment,. In the case of entrance examriations, a superior candidate 
is not likely to wait very long to know whether he is going to get the 
job. 

Finally, when promotional examinations are given, the applicant 
must have been classified in a specific Job class to qualify for the 
examination,, We have heard several cases at Civil Service Commission 
meetings where individuals seemed to have the necessary background but 
were prohibited from taking the examination because the formal experience 
requirement was not met„ 

Fourth, a frequent complaint from operating department heads is 
that the civil service process is too slow, that it does not provide a re- 
placement when it is needed,, For instance, on a purely routine requisi- 
tion,' the best service the department is able to obtain is two weeks „ 
If any sort of a problem exists, the time can be lengthened to months 
and sometimes years,, An analysis of the nunber of requisitions on file 
in the Civil Service Commission as of March 2U, 196.1 indicates that 
there were 2p0 requests from operating departments to fill perman e nt 
positions,. The average requisition was 27 weeks old, without counting 
one position which has been vacant 10 years „ Details are shown in 
Exhibit Ho A similar analysis covering requisitions for temporary 
positions indicates that the average age of the unfilled requests is 13 
weeks o Details are shown in Exhibit II«A 



IT 



WAGE & aHLRBTZ 



To overcome the necessary delays which a formal system of recruit- 
meat requires, several degrees of civil service status were developed,. 
These range from "non civil-service" which does not require civil ser- 
vice approval for appointment, to "limited tenure" which requires an 
easier civil service examination for appointment hut does rot result in 
permanent status o These substitutes are used quite frequently as shown 
on Exhibit IIZo 

Fifth , an important facet of the present examination and appoint- 
ment process is that the individual who has been assigned to a position 
on a temporary or limited tenure basis does not always get the permanent 
appointment,, When the examiration is eventually given, the one receiv- 
ing the highest score receives the permanent appointment „ He is not 
necessarily the same person who has been handling the .job for many months 
in some eases, thus requiring another training period for the new 
incumbent. 

On promotional examinations a similar occurrence may and often does 
take piece,, The individual who has worked for and waited years in some 
cases for promotion to a management job for which his duties put him in 
line, would have to pass the examination with the highest score to get 
the appointment,, If he does not, he may then be in the position of 
having to "train" his boss. This type of situation is disheartening 
and in some cases, grossly unfair to the employee vho has worked hard. 
Most Importantly, however, he may have better qualifications to do the 
job than the one who got the highest score,, Cases like this do not 
seem to be isolated as we have been told by department heads that it 
happens more frequently than they would like Also, any person may take 
the examination if he qualifies by experience and no attention is given as 
to whether the employee °s performance on hi 3 present job fits him for 
promotion,, 

In other cases, the promotional examination system works a hardship 
on certain individuals c There are instances where the replacement for 
a job vacated by a retiring employee has not been selected for one to 
two years o In the meantime, an employee who is classified on a lower 
level performs the duties of the higher job but does not receive the 
pay for the higher job„ At the same time It is" possible that the man's 
supervisor must assume the higher level duties of the retiree pending 
the selection of a replacement,, 



18 



WAGE & SALARY 



With the present grouping of employees., four separate pay policies 
are necessary for the approximately 17,000 city employees vhose pay is 
under the control of the Civil Service Commission: 



Type of Employment 
A. Police & Fire 



Bo Railway Platform 

Employees 



Hoo of 
Classes 

in 



Noo of 
Incumbents 

3,380 



1,950 



Method 



Rates set annually up to 
highest rate paid in 
California cities over 
100,000 o 



Trades & Crafts 

(Blue Collar) 



Do Miscellaneous 
(White Collar) 



758 



2,201 



9,398 



Rates set annually on 
average of two highest 
rates in United States 
cities of over 500,000 
with surface railway 
systems employing over 1*00 

Rates set annually to equal 
prevailing union contract 
rates 

Rates set in accordance 
with generally prevailing 
rate of wages paid in 
San Francisco industry or 
in other comparable 
California public 
jurisdictions o 

Group A„ — Police and Flremen While the charter language permits 
some discretion in fixing a rate "up to the highest" paid in California 
cities, San Francisco rates are equal to the highesto As a matter of 
practice in recent years, San Francisco rates have been increased each 
time eny of the cities in question exceeded the San Francisco rates 

Group Bo — - Municipal Railway Operators „ The charter language 
permits no discretion here© It is mandator/ that San Francisco pay 
these employees a rate equal to the average of the Wo highest in the 
United States There is no provision in the charter for consideration 
of possible reasons why these other railway systems are paying higher 
rates than the resto 

Group Co — Trades & Crafts o On Hovem'aer 6 S 19^5 San Francisco 
voters approved a charter amendment by addiig Section 151o3o The Civil 
Service Commission intended this section to be a continuation of Section 
151 which deals with salary standardization in accordance with the pre- 
vailing rate of pay It was designed, therefore, to make it easier to 
determine the prevailing rate of pay by surveying certain collective 
bargaining agreements 



19 



Currently there are between 32 and 3U union contracts, mainly 
those with the construction industry, used to determine the rate of pay<> 

It is our opinion that the construction industry, upon which many 
rates for these employees are based, does not provide the proper compari- 
son of Jobs© The construction industry usually offers casual and inter- 
mittent employment, employees are subject to work stoppages because of 
bad weather, lack of materials or changed work orders, and difficulties 
with transportation on work location changes are common? In contrast, 
the city employee is assured of continuity of employment in essentially 
the same area,, 

In addition, the Civil Service Commission did not intend that the 
city assume the whole collective bargaining agreement but only that 
portion dealing with the basic rate of pay© However, court decisions 
as a result of numerous cases have interpreted the "rate of pay" 
language to include pay for holidays, overtime, shift differentials, 
hours of work, vacations, and recently even health and welfare plans© 
Under these interpretations, the city is required to treat each craft 
differently with respect to these Items a This is cumbersome and costly 
to administer and is alleviated only slightly by having employees sign 
waivers whenever contract hours of work are different from those usuelly 
worked in the city. The aflroj nls tration of the variety of health and trel- 
fare plans is so complex that recently employee representatives have met 
with the civil service staff in an attempt to agree on a standard, more 
simple method,. 

An illustration of the effect of the current wage administration 
practice with respect to employees covered by 151<>3 is contained in 
Exhibit IVo 

Group Do — Miscellaneous Employees,, The Charter provides that 
salaries for these Jobs be set "in accordance with the generally pre- 
vailing rates of wages „" In a community like San Francisco there are 
many rates for similar Jobs and it is impossible to select one of these 
rates as prevailingo As a result, there has been a great deal of diffi- 
culty in developing a precise meaning for the words "prevailing rate,," 

A 19M court case established that the determination of whether 
San Francisco rates are in accord with generally prevailing rates is 
within the discretion of the rate-making authority*, 

At present, the Civil Service Commission determines what San Francisco 
should pay its employees by relying on the salary ranges established by 
either private industry or by public Jurisdictions o The information is 
obtained by two surveys % one is conducted by the Bureau of Labor Statistics 
and covers 79 Job classes in 99 San Francisco firms; the other survey is 
made by the Civil Service staff for all 75£ Job classes in other comparable 
public Jurisdictions in California 



20 



The Bo L So report furnishes individual rates of pay for each of 
the people surveyed and also reports salary ranges used by the xrarious 
firms coveredo If no salary range is in effect for a given job the 
staff calculates the IjOth and 80th percentile of the individual salaries 
paid and uses this in lieu of a rangeo Xn averaging the combined 
Bo L. So data and the public data, the staff weights the Bo L S data 
in the ratio of 11 to 1 since private companies in San Francisco employ 
11 people to the one in public employmento 

We believe the method of determining the prevailing rate is subject 
to reconsiderationo First, it is our experience, and Bo L e S e data 
confirms, that most employees of those companies using salary ranges are 
not being paid the maximum rate and therefore the average city employee 
(whose rate averages out at the k<,3 step of the 5-step range) is at a 
decided advantage o Second, using the !<Oth and 80th percentile is con- 
trary to the most common and accepted practice of using the middle 50$ 
to determine the market rate of any given jobo The city's present 
method is to drop 15$ of the lowest rates, add 5$ of the highest rates 
and reduce the data from 50$ to k0$ o Further, either the top of the 
reported range or the 80th percentile is usually used to determine the 
5th or top step in the city rangeo Sines each of the 5 steps in the 
city range is 5$ greater than the preceding step it can be seen that 
little consideration is given to the *K)th percentile or the industry 
range minimum The net effect of this reasoning is to raise the leva! 
of rates used for determining the "generally prevailing rate " This 
conclusion is supported by comparing actual earnings of city employees 
with the actual earnings of San Francisco industry reported by the 
Bo Lo S e as shown in Exhibit V 

There are other weaknesses in the present method of surveying each 
of the 758 dob classes c First, it does not provide the desired complete 
information to enable the Civil Service to properly determj pre- 
vailing rate for each Job cless 

An analysis of the published findings of the 1961 survey tends to 
support this point. We have found that? 

l6f> (121 Job classes) - no salary data is collected and no 
internal relationship is specif ied Q 

26j& (197 job classes) - no salary data is collected but a 

relationship t3 other Jobs is specifiedo 

1*$ (106 job classes) - salary data is collected for only one 
other incumbent in a similar jobo 

lk$ (106 job classes) - salary data is collected for 2-k other 
incumbents in similar JobSo 

30$ (228 job classes) - data is collected for jobs with 5 or 
more incumbent 3 o 



21 



WAGE & SALAR* 



Second, surveying each Job class leaves doubt as to the accuracy 
of the data obtained,. Analysts engaged in this work cannot reasonably 
be expected to knew the functions of each job so well as to insure the 
comparability necessary to ascertain true Job value 

Third, establishing the rate of pay for each Job class as done by 
the present method requires 758 individual decisions, each of -which is 
subject to criticism by employees or their representatives,, Rates 
recommended by the Civil Service are capable of being and have been 
criticized by employee representatives on; the interpretation of the 
published data! vhether true Job comparisons were made; the belief that 
data was available in certain Jurisdictions but was not considered by 
the staff; the belief that the staff published only data that vas detri- 
mental to the employees; any other bases vhich employees thought would 
support their viewpoint 

Fourth, this method contributes toward a climate of increasing dis- 
contentment among employees „ Fixing a rate for each Job class on the 
basis of data for each Job class, necessarily causes the proposed rates 
to go up or down depending on the data obtained,, This vas strikingly 
illustrated at the hearings held by the Judiciary Committee of the 
Board of Supervisors in February, I96I0 First, there were frequent com- 
plaints from groups of employees whose Job rates were not recommended 
for increases Then there were complaints that the parity relationships 
which had existed for years on certain Jobs were being destroyed by this 
year's recommendations <> And finally and most dramatically, there vas 
many an indignant employee -yho found that the Job from which he was 
promoted was now going to be paid as much or more than the Job he ac- 
cepted as a promotion o 

Fifth, many of the decisions made by the Civil Service with this 
method are not easily explained,. These decisions are pure Judgment of 
individual cases and although reasons are given, the employee is under- 
standably confused,, There are many cases where he fails to see any 
reason As a result he mistrusts and criticises a system he doesn J t 
understand o 

Sixth, the method of determining each Job* 3 rate by comparing it 
to the rate of another Job has definite disadvantages when the comparing 
data is based on one or two other incumbents „ Consider this cases 
San Francisco Job A with one incumbent is given a rate based on compari- 
son vith the rate of Los Angeles Job A with one incumbento If the Los 
Angeles man was not doing his Job properly and Los Angeles decided not 
to increase his rate this year, tlie man in San Francisco, who may be a 
good man, will not get an increase either o Or, conversely, we would 
be grossly overpaying the San Francisco Job with an inefficient employee 
when comparing it to a Los Angeles Job with an outstanding employee who 
has teen given increases steadily,, 



22 



WAGE & SALARY 



Suspensions sad Dismissals 

It is a general belief that Section 15 •'* ex? the charter limits dis- 
missal of permanent employees to "incompetence, habitual intemperance, 
immoral conduct, insubordination, discourteous treatment of the public, 
dishonesty, inattention to duties, or engaging in prohibited political 
activities,," This is substantiated by the rules of the Civil Service 
Commission vhich state that appeals from orders of dismissal may be 
entertained if "the dismissal was made upon cause not covered by Section 
15U of the charter,, M 

We believe the charter language is sufficiently broad and does not 
limit the line department head's authority for dismissals „ However, the 
administrative rules and the precedents established by court cases have 
given the impression that the department head must have evidence that 
will stand up in court before he can properly dismiss an employee,, As 
a result, many departments are reluctant to prefer the charges necessary 
to dismiss an employee who has achieved permanent status e 

Payroll 

The Civil Service Comrdssion must certify as to the "legality" of 
the positions for each pay period before the Controller will issue pay 
warrants or checks „ 

At present, this activity is carried on manually by some 10 clerks „ 
It is cumbersome and slow and has resulted in one instance ve are aware 
of when a group of employees did not get paid on their norsal pay day 
It is our understanding that such a situation does not happen often 
However > there should be no reason why employees eannot be paid on their 
scheduled pay day 

Perfonsanee Rating of Employees 

At present, there is no general method of providing information on 
the type of performance an enployee gives to his job* Knowledge of 
performance on the job is United to the probationary period and only 
for certain departments© The incentive value of measuring a man's per- 
formance is lost for the most part by the absence of a general program 



A central training prograa that cuts across departeent lines has 
been a widely accepted activity in aost Eodem organizations • It would 
seem this would be a profitable area for the city to consider since it 
is not always possible to obtain skilled employees* The city has already 
initiated one prograa for training first-line supervisors in supervisory 
principles but many more programs are necessary for maximum results . 



23 



WAGE & 3ALARY 

C ivil Service Commission 

While we believe the Civil Service Can>niS3ion as organized has 
contributed Materially toward stopping the evils for which it was 
designed, we feel that improvements can be :aade a 

First, because the commission is supposed to be a policing force, 
it is separated from the city's operating departmentsc Thus it makes 
decisions from a detached viewpoint when instead the personnel function 
should be en integral part of the management of the city„ We have had 
from several department heads the complaint that the Commission is in- 
clined more to the legality cf its position than to the service and aid 
of the operating departments B 

Second, the present practice of appointing eommissionei*3 results 
in having men on this important commission -*ho do not have a background 
in personnel managemento Lacking practical experience in this field, 
they bring a layman's viewpoint to the city's personnel administration o 
Because it is apparent these men are able psople in their own field who 
accept the post with the sineerest of motives, we believe the layman's 
viewpoint can best be utilized in hearing appeals.. 

Third, we believe the Commissioners, because they are charged with 
the responsibility of personnel administration, devote excessive time 
and effort in administrative matters more properly belonging to the 
staff o If proper rules and regulations are drawn, the majority of 
cases now being decided by the commission at formal hearings can be 
delegated,. These cases are illustrated in 3xhibit VIo 

Communication Between Management and Employe e 

City government, as presently constituted^ lacks channels of communi- 
cation between top management and the individual employee o Apart from 
his immediate supervisors, the employee has no one in management with 
whom he can discuss personal problems, such as, lack of rapport between 
himself and his supervisor, salary inequities, working conditions, re- 
action to fellow workers, personal ambitions, promotional opportunities, 
and even difficulties with personal finances „ 

In the circumstances the employee must work out his own problems 
without benefit of counsel and guidance froa a representative of top 
management who is skilled in these matters and who can speak with 
authority from a personnel relations viewpoint* 

This situation encourages a struggle between the employee and 
management and is not conducive to the establishment of an "esprit de 
corps" or unity of purpose so necessary to efficient government,, 



24 



COUNT OF UNFILLED REQUISITIONS FOR PERMANENT POSITIONS 
AS OF MARCH 24, 1961 



No. 


Class 






Tine Elapsed »nc< 


Requisition Placed 




















ip3 . 


No. 


Class 


Department 


1-3 Wks. 


4-8 Wks. 


3-6 Mos. 


7-12 Mos. 


1-3 frs. 


Over 3 *rs. 




A 8 


Asst. Supt. Malnt. & Repair 


P.w. 




1 












A 154 


Carpenter 


Ed. 








1 








A 404 


Plumber 


P.W. 








1 






10 


B 2 


Deputy Clerk 
•cot. Clerk 


Muni Ct 
Purch. 


1 


1 


2 


4 


3 






B 4 


Accountant I 




1 


2 












B 68 


Chief Clerk 


Registrar 




1 












B 102 


Teller 


Tax Collect. 


1 














B lot 


Sr. Teller 


Tax Collect. 






1 










B 186 


Real Est. Investigator 


Pub. Admin. 




1 












B 210 


Office Assistant 


Welfare 




2 












B 231, 


Head Clerk 


P.W. 






2 










B 250 


Parking Meter Collector 


Tax Collect. 




1 












B 302 


Address. Mach. Operator 


P U C 


1 














B 352 


Storekeeper 


Purch. 




2 




1 








B 358 


Asst. Stationery Buyer 


Purch. 






1 










B 407 


Stano. I 


Police 


1 














B 562 


Super. Comm. Div. Airport 


P U C 








1 








C 52 


Elevator Operator 


P.W. 


1 


2 


2 


2 






35 


C 106 


School Janitor 


Educat. 




6 


13 


16 








6 2 


Bailiff 


Sheriff 








1 








D 52 


Jail Matron 


Sheriff 






1 


1 








D 102 


Writ Server 


Sheriff 










1 






E 106 


Armature Winder 


P. U. 






1 










E 106.1 


Foreman Armature Winder 


P. U. 




1 












E 161 


Gen. Foreman Lineman 


P.U.C. 




1 












E 200 


Elec. R. R. Shop Mech. 


P. u. 






1 










F 51 


Airport Attendant 


P.U.C. 




1 


2 


4 








f 122 


Sr. Arch. Draftsman 


P.U.C. 


1 














F 404a 


Asst. Engineer 


P.U.C. 




2 




1 


2 


1 




F 404b 


Asst. Engineer-I 


P.U.C. 








1 








F (,04c 


Elect. Engineer 


P.U.C. 






2 






1 




F 406b 


Elect. Engineer-II 


P.U.C. 








1 




1 




P 1.06c 


Elect. Engineer-II 


P.U.C. 




1 


1 










F 1,10a 


Engineer 


P. u. 




1 




2 




2 




E 1,12a 


Sr. Civil Engineer 


P.U.C. 






1 


1 


1 






F 1,12b 


Sr. Mech. Engineer 


P.U.C. 








1 








F 522 


Asst. Engineer 


P.U. 






1 










F 568 


Urban Renewal Analyst 






1 












F 310 


Assoc. City Planner 


City Plan. 




1 












F 830 


City Planning Draftsman 


City Plan. 








1 








G 3 


Real Prop. Appraiser 


Asses. Office 






1 










10 


Super. Bldg. Appraiser 


Asses. Office 






1 










17 


Chief Personal Prop. Appr. 


Asses. Office 






1 










19 


Marine Surveyor 








1 










50.3 


Personnel Aide 


C.S. 








1 








G 58.2 


Sr. Civil Serv. Examiner 


C.S. 










1 






151. 


Sr. Inspector 


Tax Collector 




1 












H 1, 


Inspector 


Fire 








2 








H 32 


Capt. Bureau Fire Preven. 


Fire 










1 






H 40 


Battalion Chief 


Fire 


1 














H 120 


Pilot - Fireboats 


Fire 






1 










I 10 


Cooks Aast. 


Health 




1 


1 










I 116 


Orderly 


Health 


3 














I 120 


Sr. Orderly 


Health 




1 










!2 


I 134 
I 204 
J 70 
J 74 
K 20 


Lie. Voc. Nurse 

Porter 

Hostler 

Rodent Controllman 

Attn. Bureau Dellnq. Revenue 


Health 

Health 

Rec. & Park. 

Health 

Tax Coll. 


5 
2 


7 


1 
1 


5 


J 

1 






L 16 


Asst. Dir. Pub. Wks. 


Health 








i 








L 56 


Microbiologist 


Health 






1 










L 67 


Asst. Clin. Tech. 


Health 










3 






L 372 


Asst. Dir. Maternal & Child Hyg. 


Health 




1 












L 367 


Chief Div. Venereal Dis. Control 


Health 




1 












M 54 


Auto Machinist 






1 












M 53 


Asst. Dist. Super 






1 












N 66 


Chief Dairy-Milx Insp. 


Health 




1 












1 


Chauffeur 


Health 


1 














51 


Farmer Sub Foreman 


Health 






1 










60 


Sub-Foreman Gardener 


Rec. & Park 




1 


1 


3 








172 


Chief Operating Engineer 








2 










304 


Hydrantman-Gateman 


Fire Dept. 








1 








P 102 


Registered Nurse 


Health 


19 


23 






4 






P 104 


Head Nurse (Hasaler) 


Health 








1 








P 208 


Operating Room Nurse 


Health 




1 












P 304 


Instructor of Nursing 


Health 






1 


1 








Q 20 


Policewoman 


Police 




1 








1 




Q 65 


Fingerprint Tech. 


Police 










1 






R 111 


Lifeguard Watchman 


Rec. & Park 












1 




3 120 


Day Dispatcher 


P.U.C. 






1 










3 124 


Supv. of Schedules 


P.U.C. 








1 








3 126 


Supv. of Traffic 


P.U.C. 








1 








3 300 


Chief of Transportation 


Mayor 












1 (10 yrs) 




T 155 


Medical S.S. Worker 


Various 




2 












U 108 


Compressor Oper. - Portable 


P.U.C. 








1 








U 220 


Gatemn 


P.U.C. 








2 








U 142 


Aast. Superintendent 


P.U.C. 






1 










U 144 


Super. City Dis. Div. 


P.U.C. 




1 












K 10 


Coord. Children Activities 


Library 










1 







K 40 


Sr. Librarian 
GRAJJD TOTALS 


Library 


1 












39 


72 


47 


60 


24 


8 






Data collected from files of Permanent a 


Td Temporary Requi 


sitions of C 


tvil Service 


Commission 


- March 24, 


1961 





COUNT OF UNFILLED REQUISITIONS FOR TEMPORARY POSITIONS 
AS OF MARCH 24, 1961 





Class 
No. 


=,.„ 


Department 


Time Elapaud Since Hequlaition Placed 




Weeks 


Months 




2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


2 


3 


4 


5 


9 


1 

1 
I 


A 15*. 
A 155 
A 202 

A 204 


Carpenter 

Crlbber 

Cement Finishers 

Helper 

Cement Finisher 


P.U.C. 
P.U.C. 

P.W. 
P.U.C. 








1 


4 


1 






1 




3 


A 354 

A 456 

B 4 
B 6 
B 11 
B 102 
B 159 
B 228 
B 302 


Pointer 

Sheet Metal Worker 
Dep. Clerk 
Accountant I 
Accountant II 


P.U.C. 
P.W. 

Muni. Ct. 
Various 
Various 






1 




1 


2 
2 

1 


1 

1 
1 










Cost Analyst 

Teller 

Asst. Law Clerk 

Senior Clerk 

Addrss. M. Opr. 


Superv. 
P.U.C. 
Sheriff 
Sheriff & Wks. 
Registrar 






1 


2 


1 


1 
1 




1 








B 305 
B 308 
B 309 
B 310 
B 310.1 


Voting Maeh. Adjust. 
Calc. Mach. Opr. 
Key Punch Opr. 
Tab. Mech. Opr. 
Sr. Tab. M. Opr. 


Registrar 

P.U.C. 

Various 

Various 

Welfare 




1 
1 

1 


1 


2 


1 


1 
1 












B 352 
B 560 
C 104 
C 106 
C 106 


Storekeeper 
Comm. Clerk 
Janitors 
School Janitors 
School Janitors P.T. 


Education 

P.U.C. 

Various 

Education 

Education 




1 
1 










6 


32 

65 




24 




C 152 
C 184 
D 52 
E 108 
E 120 


Watchman 

Hd. Galley Atten. 

Jail Matron 

Electrician 

Governor Man 


Rec. 4 Park 
de Young 
Various 
P.U.C. 
P.U.C. 


1 


1 










3 

1 
1 


2 








E 122 
E 200 
F 91 
F 93 

F 104a 


P.H. Operator 
Elect. R.R. Shop Mech. 
Stu. Eng. Trainee I 
Stu. Eng. Trainee II 
Sr. Draftsman 


P.U.C. 

P.U.C. 

P.W. 

P.W. 

P.W. 










1 
1 

1 




1 


1 








F 352 
F 406a 
F 406c 
G 3 
C 15 


Asst. Hydrographer 
Asst. Engineer II 
Asst. Engineer II 
Real Prop App. 
Prop. Auditor 


P.U.C. 

P.W. 

Elect. 

Asses. 

Asses. 




1 


1 




2 

1 




1 

1 










I 10 
I 16 
I 53 
I 94 
I 116 


Cooks Asst. 

Chef 

Vendor 

School Cafe Helper 

Orderly 


Health 
Health 
Rec. & Park 
Education 
Health 










1 

1 
1 


2 
5 




3 








I 116 
I 170 
J 66 
J 70 
L 67 


Orderly (F)(M) 

Washer 

Garageman 

Hostler 

Asst. Clin. Teeh. 


Health 
Health 
Variou s 
P.U.C. 
Health 


12 


4 




1 


12 
I 


U 

1 
1 




29 

1 


11 






M 54 
M 260 
1 
3 
52 


Auto Machinist 

Instrument Maker 

Chauffeur 

Sch. Truck Driver 

Farmer 


P.U.C. 

Elect. 

P.U.C. 

Education 

Sheriff 


1 








1 
1 


1 
2 

1 


1 


1 


1 






57 
58 
152 
172 
280 


Tree Topper 

Gardener 

Engr. H.P. 

Chief Operating Engineer 

Sub for Asphalt Finisher 


P.U.C. 

Various 

P.U.C. 

P.W. 

P.W. 


6 


2 




1 


3 

1 


2 

1 


2 

1 


1 








P 102 
P 103 
P 104 
R 111 
R 55 


R.N's 

Special Nurse 
Head Nurse 
Night Super. 
Rec. Asst. 


Health 
Health 
Health 
Health 
Rec. & Park 












6 

21 

1 
1 


25 

9 










R 56 
R 56 
R 56 
R 110 
R 114 


Rec. Director 
Rec. Director 
Rec. Director 
Lifeguard 
Swim Instructors 


Rec. & Park 
Education 
Education 
Rec. & Park 
Rec. 4 Park 


1 


5 




1 


5 
5 


10 
20 
10 


10 

1 


20 


1 






T 56 
T 155 
U 108 
U 116 
U 12? 


Problem Officer 
Med. S.S. Worker 
Compressor Operator 
Service Man 
Water Serv. Insp. 


Adult Probation 

Health 

P.U.C. 

P.U.C. 

P.U.C. 


1 


1 






1 


1 






1 






U 136 
U 140 
X 42 
X LI, 


Gen. For. Serv. & Meters 
Gen. For. Maintenance Pipes 
Librarian 
Curatorial Asst. 


P.U.C. 

P.U.C. 

Library 

Legion of Honor 


1 










1 
22 


24 


25 


1 






23 


19 


4 


8 


46 


130 


90 


181 


16 


24 































WAGE & SALARY 
EXHIBIT HI 



ILLUSTRATION OP THE USE OF 7AHI005 AEPCCTTMEHT CATEGORIES 



i960 

Month 


Permanent 


Number of Certifications 
Limited 

Tenure 


Temporary 


Census Of 

Non-Civil 
Service Employeef 


January 


223 


49 


195 


784 


Pebruary 


131 


38 


330 


770 


March 


180 


38 


226 


873 


April 


158 


44 


196 


845 


May 


19 


57 


310 


906 


June 


129 


42 


288 


1172 


July 


£55 


36 


267 


1252 


August 


223 


29 


223 


1272 


September 


188 


48 


316 


1145 


October 


l4l 


65 


341 


1188 


November 


157 


99 


268 


968 


December 


145 


m 


274 


1268 



T0^:3 



2009 



643 



3234 



12443 



AVERAGE 
PER MONTH 



167 



54 



270 



1037 



» 



If* CO 


t-{ 




v-O 


I II 


i « 


O VI > 

3- ro 


CM 

tr\ 





O f -1 « 

<g Pi-P 

8 « 

t aS •© 
>s © to 
>° ii •'-' 

?^£ 



fc O -P 

- ctt 





.a a> 
■p 
+2 ° - 






COV0VQ 



<<B»3SSO 




a u u 

3 ■§>""' 

■p 



-POP 

to ro c 
q eg o 













WAGE & SALARY 












EXHIBIT V 










(Page 1 of 


2 pages 


COMPARISON OF MISCELLANEOUS EMPLOYEES RATES OF PAY 








(BoLoSo 


DATA) 












Jan 














1961 


July 


Jano 










Aver, 


1961 


1961 










Step 


pro- 


ELS 




Total 




Ho. 


in 


posed 


Wtdo 


Differ- 


Differ- 


Job Title 


People 
21 


Range 
5 


Salary 
$436 


Avgo 
$391 


ence 


ent 


Account Clerk 


$45 


$ 945 


Accountant I 


99 


4.3 


538 


490 


48 


4,752 


Accountant II 


45 


4,4 


641 


635 


6 


270 


Accountant III 


27 


4.3 


756 


656 


100 


2,700 


Sr Accountant 


20 


4„2 


893 


837 


56 


1,120 


Asst oDir Bur c Pubo Ssrvo 


2 


3.6 


805 


799 


6 


12 


Chief Clerk 


9 


5 


782 


777 


5 


45 


Teller 


12 


4.6 


460 


349 


111 


1,332 


Office Assistant 


33 


3 


310 


298 


12 


396 


Clerk I 


1 


5 


358 


334 


24 


24 


General Clerk 


224 


4.5 


426 


395 


31 


6,944 


Sr Clerk 


48 


4.8 


525 


428 


97 


4,656 


MsdoRecord Librarian 


3 


5 


493 


436 


57 


171 


SroMed.Record Librarian 


1 


5 


530 


503 


27 


27 


Meter Reader 


16 


4.5 


458 


463 


5 


80 


A&dres So Macho Opr o 


5 


4.7 


371 


326 


45 


225 


Sr.AddresSoMach.Opr. 


1 


5 


1*81 


431 


50 


50 


Dup Macho Opr. 


4 


3*8 


525 


447 


78 


312 


CalCo Macho Opr e 


49 


4.5 


405 


369 


36 


1,764 


Key Punch Opr IBM 


34 


4.3 


401 


370 


31 


1,054 


Tab Macho Opr. 


4l 


4.4 


445 


430 


15 


615 


Sr Tab. Macho Opr 


10 


4.1 


533 


551 


-18 


-180 


Bookkeeping Macho Opr. 


22 


4.6 


428 


398 


30 


660 


Blueprinter 


3 


5 


493 


410 


83 


249 


Photostat 0pr o 


9 


4.6 


483 


475 


8 


72 


Photographer 


7 


4.4 


611 


578 


33 


231 


Storekeeper 


33 


4.5 


426 


426 


— 


.— 


Gea Storekeeper 


12 


4.6 


508 


5*0* 


-36 


-432 


Ass to Purchaser 3up 


7 


4.6 


826 


765 


61 


427 


Stenographer I 


9 


1.6 


335 


368 


-33 


-297 


Gen e Clerk-Stenoo 


464 


4.2 


429 


382 


47 


21,808 


Legal Stenoo 


30 


4.4 


456 


439 


17 


510 


Sr» Clerk-Steno. 


36 


4.5 


518 


451 


67 


2,412 


Telephone Operator 


71 


4.6 


407 


362 


45 


3,195 


Typist I 


22 


1.8 


292 


306 


-14 


-308 


Gen. Clerk-Typist 


546 


4„4 


423 


356 


67 


36,582 


Sr Clerk-Typist 


23 


4.1 


508 


421 


87 


2,001 


Elevator Operator 


33 


2.6 


335 


340 


-5 


-165 


Jani tress 


28 


2o2 


344 


333 


11 


303 


Janitor 


232 


4.1 


378 


366 


12 


3,384 



WAGS & 3ALARY. 

EXHIBI T V 
(Page 2 of 2 pages) 



COMPARISOJf CF MESCBLLAHE0U3 EMH.CYE33 RATES OF PAY 
(BoLoS. DATA) 







Jan„ 








1961 


July 






Aver„ 


1961 






Step 


pro- 




Hoo 


in 


posed 


Job Title 


Feople 
79 


Range 
4.6 


Salary 


Watchman 


$369 


Govemorman 


3 


4„6 


472 


Power House Opr» 


27 


4.2 


535 


Sr Power House 0pr o 


7 


4.5 


728 


Jr Draftsman 


14 


4.2 


klk 


Draftsman 


53 


4.6 


573 


Architect 


10 


4.9 


992 


Archo Draftsman 


8 


3.8 


607 


Sr<> Archo Draftsman 


13 


4.7 


771 


Jr Engineer 


48 


3cU 


582 


Assto Engineer-I 


42 


4.8 


738 


Assto Engineer-II 


50 


5 


905 


Engineer 


31 


4.8 


1,089 


Sight of Way Agent 


10 


4.8 


794 


Seams tress 


ID 


4 


350 


Sr Atto - Civil 


9 


3*3 


1,012 


Clinical Labo Tech* 


7 


4,3 


551 


Physical Therapist 


3 


3»7 


k$3 


Water Chemist 


10 


4.5 


570 


Srs, Water Chemist 


1 


5 


7^5 


Dietition 


7 


4.7 


536 


X-Bay Technician 


13 


3*4 


423 


Eegistered Eurse 


295 


4.6 


460 


Head l?urse 


68 


4.9 


553 


Hight Supto of Geno Hosp e 


2 


5 


710 


Medical Social Worlser 


19 


4.4 


657 



Jan c 
1961 
HLS 

Wtdo 

Avgj, 

% 352 
469 
548 
709 
429 
491 
824 
574 
681 
550 
692 
798 
912 
769 
310 
679 
495 
428 
510 
652 
474 
407 
383 
450 
507 
542 



Differ- 

_ s H ce 

$ 17 

3 

-13 

19 

45 

32 
170 

33 

90 

32 

46 
107 
177 

25 

40 
133 

56 

70 

60 

93 

62 

16 

77 
1Q3 
203 
U5 



Total 

Differ- 

ence 

$ 1,3*3 

9 

-351 

133 

630 

4,346 

1,700 

264 

1,170 

1,536 

1,932 

5,350 

5,487 

250 

400 

1,197 

392 

210 

600 

93 

434 

208 

22,715 

7,004 

406 

2,185 



TOTALS 



3,181 4„3 1,509,497 1,352,063 



157,434 



These figures indicate the City employee's actual earnings are 11.6§» higher 
than the actual earnings for comparable Jobs in San Francisco industry© 

BLS - Bureau of Labor Statistics? A January 1961 survey of 99 San Jrancisco 
firms with employment of some 100,000 o 



WAGE & SALARY 
EXHIBIT VI 



CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION 
TYPES AED FREQUENCY OS* MATTERS CONSIDERED — 19&> 



Humber 
1. Requests for permission to seek 

additional employment 130 

So Requests for permission to participate 

in examinations or tests 90 

3o Appeals from rejection of applications 8l 

fc 8 Rotices of dismissal 33 

5c Appeals from notice of dismissal 10 

6 Termination of probationary, temporary and 

interim appointments 222 

7e> New litigation^, referrals to City Attorney 6 

80 Referrals to Mayor 6 

9» Special meetings for items for referral to 

Board of Supervisors 5 

10 o Miscellaneous and unfinished matters; requests 
for removal of name from list of eligifeles; 
hearing requests from department heads to 
fill peraanent vacancies with temporary 
appointment; to isake non civil service 
appointments^ and to amend certain rules 
concerning examinations; requests from 
General Manager of Personnel to re-classify 
certain positions; hearing requests from 
applicants to have naase returned to list of 
eligibles; adoption of keys of examinations lk6 



WAGE & SALARY 



III 

RECOMMENDATIONS ON 
WAGE AND SALARY ADMINISTRATION 

Page 
General Discussion • ....... „.<>... 26-27 

Plan for Clerical and Technical 27 

Plan for Management and Professional • • • * 28 

Plan for Trades and Crafts a... 28 

Plan for Police and Firemen c 28 

Plan for Municipal Railway Operators £ 8 

Exhibits VII to XI •• 



25 



3s SALARY 



III -BECClfliEKDATIOKS 03 WAGE & SALABY ADMIKISTRATICff 

Ife believe the recommendations in this section will require re- 
vision of Charter Sections 3?. 5.1, 35*5.2, 36.2, and 151, and repeal of 
Sections 151.1 and 151.3. 

In order that the Chief Executive of the city may know the 
direction in which to move, ve recommend that there he adopted the 
following general policies: 

1. The average salaries of city employees should equal the 
average salaries of Jobs of like work paid by San Francisco 
industry, or by other public jurisdictions in California for 
those jobs unique to the public service, 

2o These average salar5.es should be determined by making salary 
surveys on a bench-uark basis with particular care taken to 
insure equality of city jobs with tho3e being surveyed. 

3. The salaries to be paid for city job3 should be determined by 
ranking them in accordance with a systematic plan of job 
evaluation to establish internal pay and job value relation- 
ships. 

k. The job evaluation plan is to exclude only elective officers 
of the city whose salaries are to be determined by the 
electorate or the Board of Supervisors. 

In order to implement these policies, we recommend: 

1. That the city adopt an accepted industry practice of fixing 
the "prevailing rate" by averaging the salaries paid by other 
employers for the same or similar jots. This is known as a 
"weighted average, "and is determined by statistically weight- 
ing the salaries paid by the number of employees receiving 
that pay and striking an average. 

2. That the city's jobs be grouped as follows to permit con- 
sideration of natural differences in pay plans, or because the 
size of the groups warrant separate pay structures: 

Non-Mana gement, "whi te collar" jobs . We contemplate that 
clerical^ technical, semi-professional, and group leader types 
of jobs be included in this category. (Certain manual Jobs 
such as janitor, orderly, culinary workers, etc«, formerly in 
this group, have been placed in the Trades and Crafts group). 

ifessional . 

higher level 
supervisory Jobs as well as the professional, administrative, 
and executive jobs. 



26 



Trades 
lEbse .; 

Police and Fires 

unique to the public se) 

military lines than industrial lines » 

Municip al Railway Operators c The size of this group varre 
its own pay structure « 

Because existing families of Jots have been rearranged, the 11 
employees under civil service would now follow this patterns 

Present Estimated Proposed 
No. af Employees Wo. of Ei 

Clerical S» Technical 9,'tOO 5,200 

Management (part of 9,<t00) 1 9 600 

Trades & Crafts 2,2i>0 1^800 

Police & Firemen 3,li 3,^20 

Municipal Railway l,9i;0 1*950 

3» That the city take the necessary steps to analyze and organize 
job descriptions. Fortunately the city is in possession of 
current class specifications prepared by the Jacobs Company c 
While these class specifications were written more from the 
viewpoint of grouping as many Jobs as possible into classes to 
ease the recruitment and examination process , they may be used 
in lieu of ^ob description aud can be evaluated „ It is r 
mended, however, that Job descriptions be written for eval 
tion purposes. This would result in more than the 1,051 
present class specif icationa, but the descriptions can be 
grouped for examination purposes if desiredo 

Plan for Group 1 - Cl erical jtad T*>ehni.eai 

The plan is shown in some detail in Exhibit VTI. Essentic 
provides for ranking the jobs fcy a peisit evaluation system, determining 
the average salaries of industry by bench-mark Job survey, and admj 
tering the salary rarges from mtniaua to maxiffium on a time -progress 
basis o Control of the general level of pay is maintained by equating 
the average step of city pay with the everage pay earnings of indus 



WAGE & SALARY 



Plan for Group 2 - Management and Professional 

Fundamentally this plan is the same as for Group 1 with respect to 
job evaluation and salary survey, hut provides a different method of 
administering salaries and for controlling the general level of pay- 
An illustration of this plan is in Exhibit VIII. With this group we 
recommend a merit system of salary progression, i.e., the individual's 
performance should be appraised and his salary increases should be 
determined by his performance on the job. Control of the general level 
of pay is maintained by equating the aid-point of the city's salary 
ranges with the average pay earnings of industry and other public juris° 
dictions . 

Plan for Group 3 - Trades and Crafts 

Exhibit IX illustrates our plan for this group. The objective is 
to equate city salaries with those of private industry having comparable 
working conditions and permanence of employment. This eliminates the 
construction industry. 

Plan for Group k - Police and Firemen 

In line with the recommended basic pay policies, this group should 
be paid an amount equal to the weighted average of other California 
cities. We believe, however, that only the largest cities can be con- 
sidered because they are the ones which are most likely to have jobs 
comparable to the San Francisco positions. Details are shown on 
Exhibit X. 

Plan for Group 5 - Municipal Railway Operators 

Exhibit XI outlines our recommendation for this large group of 
employees. It Is also based on the general policy of paying average 
salaries for comparable jobs based on survey of the largest cities in 
California o 



28 



;4GE & SALAR? 
EXHIBIT VII 



SALARY FLAK FOE 
CLERICAL AND TECHNICAL JOBS 

We estimate there are some 500 classes of positions in this group. 
To determine what industry '3 average earnings are, a salary survey 
should "be made of bench-mark city jobs selected as a cross section from 
the lower paying jobs to the higher paying jobs. The bench-mark jobs 
should also meet these requirements: They can be found in private 
industry; are performing essentially the same duties; have relatively 
equal job value, and have sufficient employee population to make the 
comparison valid. It is suggested that the present use of the Bureau 
of Labor Statistics to gather salary data be continued. 

At the same time, internal job value relationships establishing 
the relative ranging of these bench-mark jobs, as well as all other 
jobs, should be determined through the use of modern Job evaluation 
techniques. We suggest use of a Point Factor system with some 8-10 
job factors. This type of system is best utilized when a wide variety 
of intangible skills, such as is found in clerical and technical Jobs, 
makes it desirable to break down the Jobs end evaluate each of the Job 
factors. 

The present five steps to progress from minimum through inter- 
mediate to maximum salaries should be retained on a time progression 
basis. 

The salary data should then be plotted, to obtain a salary curve. 
This is illustrated in Example A. The technique of plotting the salary 
curve should be as follows? 

1. Plot the weighted average of industry's actual salaries 
for each of the bench-mark jobs against its point or 
rank value established by job evaluation. 

2. Construct a straight line which best fits the entire 
group of plotted points. (Line X.) 

3. Determine the average step in the salary range of city 
employees occupying each of the bench-mark jobs. 

h a Consider that the constructed straight lice represents the 
average step of city pay, and from this, determine the 
intermediate, or third step, and draw a new line. (A sampling 
of the pay of city employees on Jobs surveyed by B.L.S. 
indicated that average pay of city employees is a little 
above the fourth step. Our example uses the fourth step.) 
(Line M. ) 



WAGE & SALARY 



5. Select a point near the beginning of the new line, being 
influenced by the groupings of the plotted Jobs, and 
establish this point as the internediate, or third, step 
of the first salary grade. (Point A.) 

6. Construct additional intermediate points along the line 
at some desired percentage of the dollars intersected by 
the preceding point, ( Points B.) 

7« Construct verticals at some desired percentage of each 
intermediate point, thus establisliing the spread of 
evaluation points applicable to the salary grade. 
(Lines V.) 

8. Determine a uniform percentage spread between the first 
step and the fifth step of the salary range, and construct 
horizontal lines representing this spread above and below 
each intermediate step. (Lines H- ) 

9. Abstract from this chart information to develop salary 
grade compilations specifying point values. (See 
Example B. ) 

After the salary curve is drawn and salary grades are developed 
for bench-mark jobs, assign salary grades :o each of the remaining jobs 
in accordance with the point value established by job evaluation. 

The next step is to identify the city's employees as to Job and 
salary grade. For those whose salaries are above the maximum, do not 
reduce salary; but increases should not be given until the range maxi- 
mum permits. For those whose salary is below minimum, bring salary up 
to minimum. For those whose salary falls between the new step rates, 
bring salary up to the next highest step. 

After this, the program should be maintained in current condition. 
The relative ranking of job6 should be maintained not only by a re- 
appraisal of individual jobs as requested "by department heads, but also 
by periodic audits to insure that employees are correctly identified by 
job and salary grade. We suggest that these audits be made at least 
every two years. 

In connection with maintenance of salary curve data, surveys of 
the bench-mark jobs, in essentially the same manner as the first survey, 
should be made in order to raise or lover ihe entire curve on the basis 
of the per cent change in the bench-mark jobs properly weighted. We 
suggest a salary survey be cade annually. 



WAGE & SALABY 



There may be times when a short supply of certain skills in the 
labor market will necessitate paying beyond the internal relationship 
determined by Job evaluation. The jobs affected should be treated as 
temporary exceptions. It should be the responsibility of the Board of 
Supervisors to authorize the exceptions for? a specific period, when 
supported by turnover figures and by certification that applicants for 
the positions in question are in short supyly. 



EXAMPLE "A" 




SHtflJ 31VAI»<l°03SI3MVHd MIS Ml AUV1VS *OAV 'Q1A 'S'1'8 



WAGE & SALARY 
EXAMPLE B 



SALARY GRADE TABLE 

Evaluation 

P oint Spread Salary Grade 5-Step Salary Range 

125 - ll*8 1 $273 - 28? - 301 - 316 - 332 

1**9 - 173 2 287 - 301 - 316 - 332 - 3^9 

17^ - 197 3 301 - 316 - 332 - 3^8 - 366 

198 - 225 h 315 - 331 - &1 - 365 - 383 

226 - 253 5 331 - 3*»8 - 365 - 383 - ^02 

25k - 283 6 3^7 - 3&- - 383 - ^02 - 1*22 

28U - 31U 7 36^ - 382 - 1*01 - U21 - Ul*2 

315 - 31*6 8 381 - UOO - 1*20 - 1*1*1 - 1*63 

3^7 - 379 9 ItfO - !*20 - 1*1*1 - 1*63 - 1*86 

380 - klk 10 U19 - 1*0 - ^2 - 1*85 - 509 

415 - ^52 11 H39 - U6l - 1*81* - 508 - 53 1 * 

1*53 - ^91 12 H6l - 1*81* - 508 - 53^ - 560 

2*92 - 529 13 J 'B3 - 507 - 533 - 559 - 587 

530 - 568 1U 507 - 532 - 559 - 587 - 616 

569 - 608 15 532 - 559 - 587 - 616 - 61*7 

609 - 61*9 16 558 - 586 - 615 - 61*6 - 678 



WAGE 
EXHIBIT VIII 



SALARY PLAN FOS 
MANAGEMENT JOBS 



At the present time the city has about 900 eiaployees who are 
exempt from the payment of overtime. It is estimated that another 700 
employees could logically be included as management due to the super- 
visory, administrative, executive, or professional nature of their 
Jobs. 

Management- level jobs should be ranked according to their rela- 
tive difficulty, utilizing modern job evaluation techniques. 

The weighted average salary paid to selected bench-mark jobs 
should be determined by careful surveys in private employment and in 
other public jurisdictions. 

A salary curve should then be constructed f ollowing the procedures 
outlined for the clerical and technical group. (Exhibit VII.} However, 
because our recommendation is to use merit progression for management 
personnel, in contrast to time -progression, the salary grade mid -points 
(rather than the fourth step) should equate to the weighted a\'erage 
salaries developed by the survey. This plan is illustrated in 
Example C. 

Subsequent salary surveys will disclose changes in the level of 
salaries for the bench-mark jobs, at whiefc time proper adjustment can 
be made to the salary curve and the resulting ranges. If the ranges 
are increased, top management must then decide between a general in- 
crease for all, or individual merit increases for the better perform- 
ers. 

The determination of the percentage increment between mid -points 
and the salary range spread from minimum to maximua should also be the 
responsibility of top management. This dvty should be assigned to the 
proposed Management Development Committee, together with the responsi- 
bility for over-all administration of management salaries. (See 
Exhibit XH for organization.) 

In the over-all administration of management salaries, thi3 Com- 
mittee must also determine the policies necessary to maintain the 
effectiveness of the merit progression program; giving consideration 
to the size of the merit increase budget, how it will be applied, and 
the source of the funds. 



EXAMPLE "C 




iN3HA0idN3 di land V aiVAIUd dO 



EXHIBIT IX 

SALARY PLAH FOR 
TRADES AHD CRAFTS JOBS 

In order to provide the flexibility necessary in a market 
containing, at times, major changes in the general level of pay, the 
Trades and Crafts group should be subdivided intos 

1. Mechanical 

2. Plant Operating 

3. Miscellaneous (Service, Custodial, Domestic, etc.) 

Each of the positions specified for rlnclusion in the Trades and 
Crafts group should be evaluated into a pay grade via souse system 
t/hich measures relative job difficulty, working conditions, and re- 
quired prior experience, education, or training. It is Intended that 
the system will be maintained to reflect constantly current job re- 
lationship. 

Bench-mark positions will be selected from each of the sub-groups 
(Mechanical, Plant Operating, and Miscellaneous) on the basis of? 
(l) their comparability with positions in private employment, and/or 
other public jurisdictions in the Bay Area, and (2) a significant 
number of incumbents, both inside and outride of city employ. 

Initially, a survey of these jobs in Bay Area employment should 
be made by the city for the purpose of establishing wage structures 
applicable to city employees. We suggest use of the Bureau of Labor 
Statistics for this purpose. (Examples D, E, and F illustrate this 
technique. ) 

Subsequent periodic surveys should be made to adjust the level of 
these wage structures. 

These surveys will disclose the weigated average hourly rate of 
pay for each of the bench-mark jobs, exclusive of any fringe benefits. 
it is recommended that uniform benefits (overtime, vacations, holidays, 
health, and pensions) should be applied to all city employees (Police 
and Firemen excepted). 



EXAMPLE "D" 



-J 2 

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o. 
o 





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ALL OF THE JOBS IN THE MECHANICAL FAMILY HAVING 
BEEN EVALUATED TO A PAY GRADE (JOB CLASS) THE NEXT 
STEP IS TO PLOT THE WTD. INDUSTRY WAGE AND THE PAY 
GRADE FOR EACH OF THOSE JOBS SELECTED AS BENCH- 
MARKS. A LINE OF BEST FIT IS THEN DRAWN THRU THE 
PLOTTED POINTS, THUS BECOMING THE WAGE CURVE. FROM 
THIS CURVE A FORMULA IS DERIVED AND THE WAGE FOR 
ANY PAY GRADE IS DETERMINED FROM THE FORMULA. IN 
THIS EXAMPLE THE FORMULA IS MONTHLY WAGE = PAY 
GRADE X $9,723 ♦ $398.00. 








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30VM AlHiHOH lN.V)VAin63 *0AV 'OiM 



EXAMPLE "E" 



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EXAMPLE "F" 



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W UJ 

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ALL OF THE JOBS IN THE MISCELLANEOUS FAMILY HAVING 
BEEN EVALUATED TO A PAY GRADE (JOB CUSS) THE NEXT 
STEP IS TO PLOT THE WTD. INDUSTRY WAGE AND THE PAY 
GRADE FOR EACH OF THOSE JOBS SELECTED AS BENCH- 
MARKS. A LINE OF BEST FIT IS THEN DRAWN THRU THE 
PLOTTED POINTS, THUS BECOMING THE WAGE CURVE. FROM 
THIS CURVE A FORMUU IS DERIVED AND THE WAGE FOR 
ANY PAY GRADE IS DETERMINED FROM THE FORMULA. IN 
THIS EXAMPLE THE FORMUU IS: MONTHLY WAGE = PAY 
GRADE X $21,333 ♦ $268.00. 
































































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& SALARY 
EXHIBIT X 



SALARY PLAN FOR 
POLICE AMD FIREMEN 



The monthly base salary for a policeman or a fireman beginning 
his fourth year of service, and thereafter, should equal the weighted 
average salary paid for the same job in California cities larger than 
100,000 population, tte suggest such weighted average be determined 
annually. 

All of the other uniformed, or badged, Jobs in either department, 
except Chief and Deputy Chief, should receive percentage differential 
over base salary. F:>r example: 



Sergeant, Folice Department 13 . 5$ 

Lieutenant, Police Department 25 

Lieutenant, Fire Department 15 

Captain, Fire Department 25 

(Note: As suggested in the report of the 
Task Force which studied the Police Depart- 
ment, it is possible that the salary relation- 
ships among management positions in the Police 
and Fire Departments need to be realigned.) 



Salaries for Chiefs, Deputy Chiefs, and all other department 
personnel could be determined under the salary plan (Clerical and 
Technical Plan or Management Plan) applicable to the particular 
position. 



& SALARY 



Using the most recent data available from the Civil Service 
Commission, the following tabulation shows what San Francisco would 
pay to policemen and firemen under the proposed method of calculation: 







1-1-1961 


Total Number 




Total number 


Maximum 


x 


City 


Polioemen and Firemen 
137 


Base Salary 
$5^3 


Maximum Base 


Anaheim 


7^,391 


Berkeley 


182 


570 


103,7^0 


Fresno 


337 


563 


189,731 


Glendale 


176 


579 


101,901+ 


Long Beach 


722 


587 


U23,8U 


Los Angeles 


5,2^5 


575 


3,015,875 


Oakland 


888 


596 


529,2^8 


Pasadena 


165 


555 


91,575 


Sacramento 


377 


575 


216,775 


San Diego 


752 


587 


kki t h2b 


San Francisco 


2,519 


596 




San Jose 


33T~ 


578 


194,786""" 


Santa Ana 


165 


565 


93,225 


Torrance 


113 


578 


_ 65, 31|t 



Total 



9,596 



5,5^1,802 



Weighted Average » $578 



WAGE & SALARY 
EXHIBIT XI 



SALARY PLAN FOR 
STREETCAR AND BUS OPERATORS 



Wages for San Francisco's streetcar and bus operators should 
equal the weighted average of salaries for similar work on those 
systems operating in California municipalities whose population is 
greater than 100,000. 

As designated by the management of the Municipal Railway 
System, the salaries for certain other S-cla3S jobs, considered to be 
in a logical promotional line from operator, should relate directly 
to the operator rate of pay. For example: Inspector, Municipal 
Railway, should, unless there is a change in Job content, continue 
to receive a rate 30$ higher than bus operator. 

Based on the most recent data available, the 'rate for operator 
would be calculated as follows: 



Iresent 





No. of 




Equiv. 




City 


Operators 
(with Oakland) 


Hr. Rate 
$ - 


Mo. Rate 


No. x Hr. Rate 


Berkeley 


$ ,. 


Fresno 


57 


2.21 


383 


126 


Glendale 


26 


2.06 


357 


54 


Long Beach 


211 


2.26 


392 


477 


Los Angeles 


2,664 


2.49 


432 


6,633 


Oakland 


875 


2.55 


442 


2,231 


Pasadena 


81 


2.25 


390 


182 


Sacramento 


153 


2.42 


419 


370 


San Diego 


44o 


2.47 


428 


1,087 


San Francisco 


1,950 
75 


2.6025 
2.23 


451 
~38T~ 




San Jose 


165 


Torrance 


22 


1.79 


310 


39 



Total 



4,603 



$11,364 



Weighted Average e $2.47 



WAGE & SALAItl 



RECOMMENDATIONS OH BE ORGANIZATION 
0? THE CIVIL SERVICE FUNCTION 

Page 

General ooooooooo»oooooooooboooooooooooooo<<oooooooooooo«ooo ^0 

Civil Service Commission.oooooooo.ooooooocoooooooooooooooo 30 
Employee Relations 000000000 00000000000. oocooooooo. 00000000 31 
Recruiting and Examinations .0000.0000000000000000000000000 31 

Benefits oooooocoooooooooooooooooooooooooocoooooooooooooooo 32 

Vage & Salary Administration « «, «odooooooocoooooooooooooooo 32 
Administrative Serviceso o oooooooooooooooocoooooooooooooooo 32 

ReSeareho ooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo oooooooooooooooo 32 

Trainingo o « » o o o o o o o o o o » o o , o » o o » o o » o o * o <, o o o » o o o o o o o « o 33 
Management Developmento oooooooooooooooooocoooooooooooooooo 33 
Suggestions Committee oooooooooooooooooooocoocoooooooooooo $k 

PsyrOllo oooo.ooooooooooooooobooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo 3k 

Exhibi tm.... ;, 



29 



WASE & S/ 



IV o Recommendations on Reorganization of the City's Civil 

Service Function 

We believe the recommendations in this section will require a 
major recasting and redefinition of the charter provisions governing 
the Civil Service function (Sections lUO through 157) • 

Attached as Exhibit XII is a chart depicting our proposal for a 
Fersonnel Department which will provide modern management techniques 
contributing to the development of a highly productive force and 
generating the level of morale needed to make city government a 
cohesive unito 

In formulating the recommendations for reorganization of the city 
civil service function, we were guided by the following objectives ; 

lo To continue those functions of the present civil service 
system that prevent undue political pressure in making 
appointments to jobs and in administering personnel 
relations o 

2« To establish a positive personnel management viewpoint 
that will result in a vigorous program of attracting, 
selecting, developing, and retaining well -qualified 
personnel devoted to the best interests of the city* 

3« To encourage and permit the maximum desirable participa- 
tion of operating departments in decisions affecting 
values of jobs and of employees, training and develop- 
ment, and recruitment and retention of an able staff o 



Civil Service Coamissio n 

The present Civil Service Commission should absorb the additional 
functions of the retirement and health service plans It should be 
expanded to seven members and technical skills should be represented 
in these categories: personnel, insurance, banking, medical, and 
legal. Its major functions will be to heesr appeals on administrative 
decisions affecting city employees and to give advice and counsel to 
the Personnel Director* 

Another important and vital duty would be to safe-guard the merit 
systemo It should receive basic management type reports on personnel 
activities which will permit appraisal of results „ These reports, 
coupled with iiiformation developed on hearing appeals, should provide 
sufficient information for the commission to know whether the job 
being done by the Personnel Director is satisfactory. If they find 
it is not, they should recommend corrective action, including separa- 
tion of the Personnel Director, to the city's administrative heado 



30 



WAGE & SAX 

The Personnel Director should be appointed by the city's adminis- 
trative head and should be accountable to him for results » His duties 
are to administer the city's personnel function through the various 
sections of the Personnel Departraento 

Employee Relations 

The major purpose of the Employee Relations section is to main- 
tain continuous contact with city employees to determine status of 
morale. It is contemplated that they will periodically visit line 
departments thereby making themselves available should any employee 
want to discuss a problem,, Employees may contact this section through 
their own supervisors whenever they feel they require counsel and advice 
on personal problems, Job- connected or otherwise* The Employee 
Relations section should settle grievances, have contact with employee 
representatives, make exit interviews when desirable, give pre-retirement 
advice, encourage employee recreational and social groups, and handle 
any other matters relating to the employee on-the-job. While they 
should give all consideration possible to the employee's problems and 
requests, they also should bring to bear a management viewpoint on the 
problem at hando These contacts will provide information and data on 
the status of employee morale. General concepts and conclusions should 
be reported to management so that they may be considered in the planning 
and implementation of major personnel programs . 

Recruiting and Examination 

Flexibility should be installed in the present rigid requirements 
for examinations to develop lists of eligibles. There are quite a few 
entrance jobs, such as Clerk-typist, Clerk-steno, Orderly, for which 
formal examination announcements and eligible lists could be eliminated 
when the number of job openings exceeds the number of applicants. In 
these circumstances, Jobs should be filled on a first come-first served 
basis after a reasonable qualifying test of the skills required. A6 
soon as the number of applicants exceeds vacancies and undue political 
pressure is brought on this section for selection of certain indivi- 
duals, the Civil Service Commission could require formal examinations 
and eligible lists. 

While formal examinations may be the most desirable way of selecting 
individuals for promotions, we believe the; procedure should be limited 
to non-management jobs. In this area, technical skill is paramount and 
the formal examination process is possibly the best way to determine 
this. On the other hand, management Jobs require the rare skills of 
working through other people to obtain reeults. These skills are 
intangible and we do not believe they can be ascertained through 
examinations. Therefore, the examination procedure should be limited 
to non -management jobs. An examination for a management job should 
be necessary only when there is no qualified person already in the city 
service. 



31 



WASE & S-' 



If department heads are to be held accountable for the work of 
their employees, it would be desirable that they be permitted more 
leeway in finally selecting applicants for job vacancies o We recom- 
mend elimination of the present mechanical, impersonal system of 
confining selection only to the top name on the eligible list and 
substitute instead a more realistic and flexible approach of selecting 
from among the top five namss for non -management jobs.. We believe 
this would encourage appointment of the most suitable candidate which 
is the goal of the entire recruitment and examination process <> 

The section should be given an adequate advertising budget to 
permit a vigorous campaign of developing sources of supply and of 
making more personal appeals to applicants, particularly in the 
professional ranks » 

Benefits 

We believe the present separate functions of health insurances 
and the retirement plan should be adrainis';ered under the Personnel 
Director., This section would handle paper work and maintain the 
necessary records <, Borderline cases should be decided by the Civil 
Service Commission., The necessary investment of funds should be 
handled by the proposed Director of Finance o 

Wage and Salary Administration 

Most of this subject is covered in Section SIS of this reporto 
Zn addition, we suggest the use cf a Job Evaluation Committee to 
evaluate Jobs based en descriptions prepared by analysts of this section.. 
This committee should be composed of seven high ranking line department 
people who should serve on the committee for a term of 3 - 5 years 
As terms expire, new people should be appointed so that job evaluation 
techniques can be xinderstood by as many a3 possible and to provide 
opportunity for line personnel to learn a'oout city-wide problems c 
Appointments are to be made by the city's administrative head upon 
recommendation of the Personnel Director. 

Administrative Services 

A section to take care of t&e "house keeping"? files, service 
records, typist and stenographic pools, supplies, desks, telephone 
service and other similar matters „ 

Research 

To keep abreast of the latest developments in the personnel field 
including employee bef-tfit programs is a lajor duty of this section o 
The other major function would be to show the condition of personnel 
activities; turnover, age, length of service, relation of salaries to 
control points of salary ranges, reasons for separation, number of job 
vacancies, number and size of salary increases, and other similar matters. 



32 



WAGE 



graining 

The major purpose of this group is to train the employee on the 
job to do his job better and to help him prepare for advancement. 
This group should work very closely •with the line departments in 
developing training manuals and courses of instruction. It should 
also publish a house organ for city employees. 

M anagement Development 

This section should perform the staff work for the Management 
Development Committee. 

To implement a management development program a committee of the 
city's top management should be organized. The committee is to be 
known as the Management Development Committee and should be composed 
of seven members: the Mayor, the city's administrative head, the 
Personnel Director, the Budget Director, and three of the line depart- 
ment directors on a rotating basis. 

The Committee's major objective should be to develop future 
management personnel on a planned purposeful basis so that qualified 
individuals will be available when vacancies occur. In addition, a 
major activity of the Committee should be the development and overall 
coordination of the Management Salary Plan. 

All management personnel will come under the purview of this 
Committee. Performance reports and reports on estimates of potential 
will be required on each person at the management level. 

At the lower levels, for instance those persons receiving $500- 
600 per month, the Committee should limit its duties to passing upon 
recommendations for salary increases. This will permit them to become 
acquainted with the available personnel. Between $600-800, the 
Committee should begin to aake plans for the individual's future 
development. At over $800, the Committee should approve definite 
programs, tailored to the individual's m/eds and to the requirement 
of the city for managerial ta3.ent. 

To accomplish its objective, the Committee should have authority 
to place management level people in any job in any department that will 
fit into the individual's development program. It is contemplated 
that only infrequently will a position have to be filled from outside „ 
In these cases, a competitive examination should be given to bring the 
men into the city service. 

If the management development program is to be successful, the 
Committee should also have authority to demote or dismiss those 
individuals who, after a reasonable and fair opportunity, do not 
display the necessary aptitudes or whose performances on the higher 
jobs are not satisfactory. 



33 






Suggestions Committee 

This function is shown as part of the Personnel Department but 
it could be assigned to some other staff unit. We believe that, to 
be successful, a suggestion program must have strong leadership and 
proper publicity. We think that the required direction and coordina- 
tion can be provided by the Personnel Director » 

The Committee would make final decisions as to the value of the 
suggestions and avard prizes accordingly. The Committee should be 
composed of seven members drawn from the operating departments. 

Payroll 

This unit has not been provided for in the proposed organization., 
The handling of payrolls and related records is an accounting function 
and should be done on modern tabulating equipment. 

We believe that a simplified procedure to authorize changes in an 
individual's pay status, the use of tabulating equipment producing 
checks or warrants requiring endorsement by the employee for encashment, 
and a reasonable periodic audit by a disinterested group, is sufficient 
safeguard to prevent manipulation for dishonest reasons. 

This method would eliminate the present costly, time-consuming 
clerical procedure and would eliminate the need for some 10 employees o 



3* 



EXHIBIT XI I 




lit =s £ 

i|§ "!i E 
?l° sits 






SAVINGS 



Comments and Summary of Savings 



35 



WAGE & S 

V. 

Savings 

The Tesk Force and its Advisory Committee believes the recommen- 
dations on vage and salary administration will result in competitive 
vages<, The salary levels that vill result from the proposals will 
permit the city to obtain its fair share of the labor market and to 
retain the employees it is able to attracto 

We would like to point out that other incentives apart from the 
general level of salaries should be emphasized: permanence of 
employment, training programs, promotional opportunities, and perhaps. 
If conditions warrant, incentive pay for outstanding performance at 
the management level and length of service pay increments for 
superior non -management employees <> 

Our recommendations have been made en this basis » If they are 
accepted and implemented we believe the city can make the following 
savings on its payroll: 

I, Clerical & Technical $^,000, 000 

2 a Management no estimate 

3» Trades & Crafts 2,500,000 

ko Municipal Railway operators 500,000 

5o Police & Fire 800,000 

Total $7,800,000 



3n estimating this total savings, the Task Force utilized existing 
datao We believe the savings of $7,800,000 is conservative and can 
well reach $10 million., 

In calling these reduced costs "savings" we do not intend to 
suggest that salaries should be cut but rather that the savings will 
accrue by denial of salary increases until such time as the average 
earnings of industry reach the average salaries paid to city employees <> 
At the present rate of the rising economy, this should take place in 
2 or 3 years c 

With regard to the recommendations dealing with the reorganization 
of the city's civil service function, we believe that if the experience 
cf modern organizations is used as a criterion, the additional savings 
to be realized from a productive force with high morale would be 
substantial o 



36 



REPORT 

WITH RECOMMENDATIONS 

CONCERNING MOB ACTIVITIES 

OF THE PURCHASING DEPARTMENT 

OP THE CITE AND COUNT* 

OF SAN FRANCISCO 



HI THE 

PURCHASINC- DEPARTMENT 

TASK FORCE 01" THE 

MAYOR'S GOMMITTSE FOE MUKI3IPAL MANAGEMENT 






MAY 1961 



Mr„ Marshall 0» Mustaln 

Project Director 

Mayor's Committee for Municipal Management 

San Francisco, California 

Dear Mr* Mustaln: 

The Purchasing Department Task Force has completed a comprehensive 
review of the functions end activities of the San Francisco Purchasing 
Department -with the objective of discovering opportunities for improv- 
ing the organization, administration and operations and making construc- 
tive recommendations for betterments and economies » Its report is sub- 
mitted herevitho 

While it was originally intended to cover only the purchasing func- 
tions, it soon developed that other non- related activities were present- 
ly included in the Purchasing Department organization which are not 
normally considered to be a purchasing agent's responsibility „ Conse- 
quently, the scope of the survey had to be considerably expended in 
order to determine the extent to which similar functions and activities 
were being performed in other departments within the City government. 

The method of approach included preparation of a general outline 
of procedure, as these applied to the office and field operation of the 
various organizational subdivisions . Deformation was gathered by con- 
ferences with department heads, their assistants and the supervisors of 
the separate activities, followed by personal observations of actual 
operations and procedures at all locations . Da addition, extensive 
research was carried on covering private industry practices and the 33 
in other comparable governmental Jurisdictions 

The recommendations represent a distil3.ation of survey, research 
and the combined thinking and Judgment of the Task Jbrce„ Later thi3 
material was "test checked" with the department administrative and su- 
pervising personnel concerned and revised as necessary ■> 

The Task Force acknowledges and appreciates the fine cooperation 
received from all le\ r els of management, supervisors and individual 
employees. Da a number of instances management has already recognised 
some of the matters covered in the report and has initiatsd corrective 
measures, which is a commendable attitude 



Douglas Holcomb 
Chairman 

Joseph F. Base 



HIRCHASIKG 



TABLE OP COHTEMPS 





SS£ 


Introduction and Summary 


5 


I » Organization and Administration 




Findings 


13 - Ik 


Recommendations 


Ik - 15 


II - Bureaus of Buying, Personnel and Accounts 




Findings 


17 - 23 


Recommendations 


23 - 28 


III » Bureau of Equipment and Supplies 




Findings 


30 - 37 


Recommendations 


37 - 39 


IV ~ Bureau of Shops 




Findings 


kl - 66 


Recommendations 


66-78 


V - Bureau of Tabulating and Reproduction 




Findings 


80-88 


Recommendations 


88-90 






LIST OF EXHIBITS 

TITLE 

Section Exhibit 
Number Number 

I I Organization Chart of Present Purchasing Department 
HI H Organization Chart of Proposed Purchasing Division 



IV III Organization Chart of Proposed Central Motorized 

Equipment Department 

V IV Organization Chart of Proposed Central Services 

Department 



Organization Chart of Proposed Central .Data 
Processing Division 






BTOROBUCTION AHD SUMMARY 

BAGS 

General 5 

I - Organisation and Administration 5 

H - Bureaus of Buying,. Personnel and Accounts 6 

IH «• Bureau of Equipment and Supplies 7 

IV - Bureau of Shops 8 

V - Bureau of Tabulating and Reproduction 9 

Estimated Savings 10 



Oeaeral 

The Task Force assigned to survey the organization, administra- 
tion and activities of the Purchasing Department herewith submits its 
report of findings and recommendations, 

While at first it was presumed that the efforts were to be pri- 
marily directed at the City-County-vide purchasing function end re- 
lated activities, it soon became apparent that this subdivision of the 
total organization structure embodied other non- related activities and 
services such as Central Garage and Shopo, Reproduction and Tabulat 
The scope of the survey was broadened to include these matters, both in 
the Purchasing Department and in other City government units conducting 
automotive repair or tabulating operations. In addition, the form. 
of a Central Services Department, containing some existing activities 
and several new activities was considered. 

Each of the organizational subdivisions was studied separately by 
interviewing and conferring with the department administrators, tha.tr 
assistants, supervisors and staff personnel,, both in the offices and 
at the various field locations. Subsequently the preliminary obss 
tions and conclusions were reviewed with the top level department man- 
agement and the respective principals concerned. 

The subject report is divided into she following sect ions % 

I. Organization and Adnioie oration 

II. Bureaus of Buying, Personnel and Accounts 

III. Bureau of Equipment and Supplies 

IV. Bureau of Shops 

V. Bureau of Tabulating and Reproduction 

The Findings with reference to each of these subdivisions ara 
sented first, usually in the form of a general statement followed by 
several pertinent numbered paragraphs dealing with specific matters. 
At the conclusion of each section, a series of Recommendations are 
made which relate to these findings and embody the combined thinking 
and judgment of the Task Force. 

The following summary paragraphs touch briefly on some of tba 
salient and important aspects, under each of the above sectional 
headings . 

I. Organization and Ad m inistration 

The present organization of the Purchasing Department should be 
revise-d to conform to good practice in both private and public juris- 
dictions and the unrelated functions recognized and organized separ- 
ately, leaving only buying and stores functions under the purchasing 
organization. Ihe recommended organization structures, including c 
currently existing and proposed ecti7ities, would be ae follovss 



piffles 



Central Purchasing Division 

lo Bureau of Buying 

2. Bureau of Personnel and Accounts 

3. Bureau of Equipment and Supplies 

Central Motorized Equipment Department 

1. Central Shops 

a. Autosrobile Shop 

he Eruck Shop 

Co Fire Shop 

d<> Motorcycle Shop (nev activity) 

e„ 7 Auxiliary Shops 

2. Branch Service Stations 

3. Passenger Car Pool (new activity) 
1». Management and Accounting 

Central Services Department 

1. Reproduction Service 

2. Photostat Service 

3. Photograph Service 

ho Offset Printing and Duplicating Service 

5o ^telephone Service (now under Department of Public Works) 

60 Public Deformation Service (nov under Department of Public 

Works) 
7« Office Equipment Maintenance (nev activity) 
8. Records retention and Disposal (now under Director of Finance 

and Records) 
9o Messenger Service (nev activity) 

10. Mailing Service (nev activity) 

11 o Clerical, Hyping and Stenographic Pool (nev activity) 

Central Data P rocessing Division 

1. City Hall (2-shift operation) 

2o Hall of Justice 

3. Managemer.t and Accounting 

II . Bu reaus of Buying, Personnel and Accounts 

Entirely too much time and effort are being devoted to the pro- 
cessing of requisitioning and purchasing documents, nearly two-thirds 
of the purchase orders dealing with amounts under $100, detailed 
analyses indicating that many of these are for less than $2. 

As a consequence, buyers are obliged to devote considerable tine 
to such details ard routines and naturally cannot concentrate on the? 
more important aspects of specification preparation, determining quan- 
tities to be purchased, prices to be paid, selecting vendor sources,., 
studying markets, searching for better and more economical sources of 
supply and substitute materials, etc* 



PURCHASIS3 



Recommendations are made to correct and improve the various a 
of procurement activities to effectuate betterments, especially through 
considerable delegation of authority and responsibilities for Baking 
small purchases up to $100 at the departmental levels , 

In general the rnechan1.es of preparing and processing the purchas- 
ing forms were found to be satisfactory with some improvements be ; 
feasible in the clerical, typing and related procedures and in the 
solicitation of quotations and bids. 

Timekeeping and payroll procedures were also noted for improve- 
ments such as uniformity of forms and procedures to simplify and 
expedite daily time reporting o 

Suggestions have been made for improving the budgetary accoiur 
control and monthly reporting for the information and guidance of the 
department head and others concerned, 

IIIo Bureau of Equipment aod Supplies 

This subdivision involves the administration of 21 separate de- 
partmental storerooms. Though apparently intended to be "central! zed" 
in the Purchasing Department, t}ie arrangement may be classified as <. 
"decentralised " stores system. The survey stressed the two principal 
phases of good storekeepings 

a<> Physical aspects of storing and handling commodities, 
materials and supplies <> 

b. Control, replenishment, issuance and accountability for 
items and quantities stored 

In general, when measured against normally recognised good str 
keeping practices, there are opportunities for making considerable 
improvements in both these phases , 

There appeared to be little evidence of sufficient attention hav- 
ing been given to the location, space requirements, design, construc- 
tion and layout of so many specific stores facilities to serve such a 
far-flung organization as the City-County, This applies particularly 
to what, where and how much is to be stored at each location. 

In some instances buildings are in dilapidated condition; store- 
room layouts are unsatisfactory to fair; considerable makeshift woo 
bins and shelving were observed ranging from poor to satisfactory con- 
dition. Identification and location of stored items, storing methods 
in use, materials handling equipment,, safety and protection were founc 
deficient at a number of locations. Some storage yards are in need of 
improvement to effect more orderly and safeguarded outdoor storage. 






Inventory systems and records were fox?nd to be non-uniform from 
storeroom to storeroom, and posting issuances , receipts and balances 
on band vers not always kept current . Indication of minimums and maxi- 
mums to be carried in stock were consistently absent. Under these 
cumstances the establishment and maintenance of complete, accurate 
inventory systems at all locations is believed difficult. 

Such records as are available Indicate, in general, that stocks 
on hand at the various locations ran^e from 5°7 to 20.2 months of the 
normal needs, suggesting a possibility of reduction in inventory values 
of around $^50,000. A considerable portion of this excessive inven- 
tory consists of obsolete and unneeded items. 

The Central V/arehouse is not being utilized to fullest extent in 
storing items commonly used by all departments. Expansion of these 
facilities could result in comparable reduction of inventories at ths 
separate locations. 

I?. Bureau of Shops 

This present subdivision of the Purchasing Department is responsi- 
ble for the servicing and maintenance and repair of about 1,300 motor 
vehicles assigned to 3^ different departoents; the work being per- 
formed principally at the Central Shops in the southeastern sectic 
the City. Although designated as central shops, there are a number of 
other separate repair and servicing operations being performed through- 
out the City aud the scope of the activities still remains widely 
scattered and the span of supervision necessarily thin. This also 
results in a considerable amount of supervision on a separate depart- 
mental basis, leading to the conclusions that the effectiveness of 
this type of organization is not the most desirable and consequently 
the consolidation of some of these separate activities would be 
advisable . 

The present excellently constructed buildings at the Central, 
present opportunities for expanding the scope of activities to provide 
for a Central Motorized Equipment Department for handling of substan- 
tial maintenance and repair jobs on automobiles, trucks and motorized 
equipment units, leaving a number of the present branch facilities to 
serve principally in rendering "gas station" service and making minor 
repairs ■> 

An effective preventive maintenance program is proposed to be 
established at the Central Shops. 

The "ownership" of all automotive vehicles and motorized equip- 
ment will be vested in the Central Motorized Equipment Department which 
will thereafter be responsible for all maintenance, repair and inci- 
dental services, including replacements and new acquisitions. 



An over-all accounting system and cost control is proposed as 
part of the centralized department operations for the purpose cf 
establishing a uniform schedule of monthly rates for different types, 
makes and models of automobi3.es, trucks and other equipment now in use., 

It is also intended to establish a centralized p?.ssenger car pool 
in the Civic Center area, with the possibility of one or two centrally 
controlled branches at outlying areas. 

V. Bureau of Tabulating and Reproduction 

As presently established, the Reproduction Bureau may be con- 
sidered a possible nucleus for the development of a city- wide central 
services agency, it being now limited to blueprinting^ photostating, 
photography and offset duplicating services. It is intended to expand 
these to include a clerical, typing and stenographic pool, messenger 
service, mailing, office equipment maintenance, telephone service, 
information service and records retention and disposal. 

The estimated total annual cost for equipment rexrfcal and operat- 
ing salaries of all tabulating installations is close to $1,OOG,OCXX 
The existing Central Tabulating unit offers centralized services to 
all departments, but in actual practice this represents only about 
12$ of the total tabulating costs. About 72$ of the tabulating costs 
are incurred in 12 other City departments, exclusive of the installa- 
tion at the Board of Education which incurs about iGjr, of the costs. 

It is proposed that the separate tabulating installations in 
these various departments, excepting the Police Department and the 
Board of Education, be consolidated in a Central Data Processing Divi- 
sion to be administered by a Data Processing Manager. It is inteir 
that a complete detailed analysis be made of the work performed at 
the various separate locations in order to determine the niniKum ec 
cent and staffing requirements to insure maximum economical utilisa- 
tion on a two-shift basis. The Data Processing Manager will be per- 
sonally responsible for installing a record of employee daily time 
and equipment usage and to develop detailed procedures and scheduling 
of all jobs on the basis of a continuing analysis of the work require- 
ments by the different using departments to maintain highest usage of 
the equipment and personnel* 

Estimated Savings 

Estimates were made of the numerous recommendations in the several 
sections of the report in terms of recurring annual &nd one-time 
savings. Obviously these would consist of reductions of direct and 
indirect costs of operating^ ma5aitenance and repair activities in - : 
of the areas covered, as well as in some of the related and auxiliary 
services. Because of the limited statistics available in the various 
fields, the making of detailed evaluations i3 difficult. However, the 
following ranges of estimated savings are presented as a reasonable 
expectation resulting, from implementing the recommendations . 






ESTIMATED SAVTBBS 



A. Mo Charter Revision Necessary 
1. Recurring Annual Savings 



a. Bureau of Equipment and Supplies $ 20,000 - $ 30,030 

Staff reductions resulting from 
storeroom reorganizations and more 
efficient handling of stores 
operations, procedures., and 
records keeping. 

2. One "time Savings 

a. Sale of High Pressure Pipe Yard $120,000 - $130 

Disposal of Fire Department high 
pressure pipe storage yard, to 
he made unnecessary by trans- 
ferring pipe and fittings to 
Water Department Pipe Yard. 
(Additional revenues would be 
derived from taxes on this pro- 
perty and any future improve- 
ments a) 

b. Recovery from Obsolete Stocks $ 30,000 - $100,000 

Income derived from sale of 
obsolete unseeded materials, 
supplies and equipment items 
and junk as a result of a 
detailed salvage survey . 

Co Reduction of Current Stock Replenish- 
ments $150,000 - $200,000 
Reduction of current expenditures 
to replenish stocks at various 
storerooms in order to gradually 
reduce quantities on hand to a 
reasonable basis. 

TOTAL ESTIMATED ANNUAL SAVHJSS $300,000 - $460 

B. Charter Revisio n Hecessary 

a. Bureau of Buying, Personnel & Accounting $350,000 - $400,000 
Staff reductions due to improved 
methods, and procedures; more effi- 
cient buying practices; elimination 
of unnecessary clerical details from 
purchaser's duties. 



10 



b. Central tfotorized Equipment Departmen t $1*10,000 - $200,000 
Staff reductions; elimination of con- 
tractual services in automobile shop, 
truck shop, servicing police cars and 
servicing and repairing motorcycles. 

Operation of Car Pool, resulting in 
decrease in number of passenger cars 
together vita savings in purchase, 
maintenance, insurance and operating 
costs. 

Elimination of unnecessary chauffeur 
positions » 

Co Central Data Processing Department $150,000 - $175 , 000 
Consolidation "and centralisation 
of tabulating equipment and operat- 
ing personnel; fuller equipment 
utilization; better scheduling of 
jobs and adoption of regular two- 
shift operation. 

(Bo estimate possible on savings from 
electronic data processing equipment 
yet to be installed - savings should 
be substantial.) 

d. Centml Services Department $225,000 - $275 

Expansion of existing services ; 
transfer of services from other 
departments, addition of new 
services; consolidation and cen- 
tralisation of all these in one 
organization, resulting in princi- 
pal savings through the operation 
of a clerical, stenographic and typ- 
ing pool, central mailing service, 
offset printing and duplicating, and 
records retention and disposal. 



TOTAL ESTIMATED AMUAL SAVTEGS $865,000-$!, 050. 



GRAND TOTAL $1,185,000*?!^ 510,000 



11 



- I - 

.ORGANIZATION _ ^_AngnjISBRATiqK 

Page 
Findings 

ReaoaaaenidatiOii3 14 

Exhibit I - Chart of Present Purchasing Department 



12 






OKGAHIZAtfiGH AM) ADHSHXSTRATXQK 



The Purchasing Department organization and activities as origi- 
nally established by Charter Section 6l comprised a Bureau of Supplies 
(today divided into the Bureau of Buying and the Bureau of Personnel 
and Accounts) , Central Stores and Warehouses (today called the Bureau 
of Equipment and Supplies), and Central Garage and Shops (today called 
the Bureau of Shops). Subsequently, a Tabulating and Reprouductio& 
Bureau was created to fill a growing need for such services on a 
centralized basis. 

The Purchasing Departments and its five Bureaus have a staff of 
201 persons and supervised purchasirg activities involving the ex<= 
penditure of $17,000,000 during the fiscal year 1959-60, 

lo The importance and magnitude of San Francisco City and 

County purchasing and storing activities and responsibilities 
warrant consideration of being organized as a separate 
department under a professionally trained and experienced 
Purchasing Agent reporting to a chief executive. 

2« The importance and magnitude of operating the central garage 
and shops is likewise a distinct and separate function 
requiring specialized technical and mechanical knowledge, 
ability and experience of sufficient importance and responsi=> 
bility to warrant establishment o? a separate motorized 
equipment organization to cover all automotive vehicles and 
other motorized equipment. 

3» The importance and magnitude of mechanical tabulating opera° 
tlons throughout the City and County organization warrants 
establishment of a separate department under a chief 
executive. 

The existence of individual mechanical tabulating eqviipment 
installations in 13 different departments at various loca- 
tions (exclusive of the Beard of Education), involving o 
130 units for which the annual rental amounts to approxi- 
mately $270,000 warrants consideration for establishing a 
separate centralized data processing center for reduction 
of equipment units to a minimum and for scheduling its 
maximum utilization to serva the needs of ail departments , 
so far as such centralised usage can be adapted to their 
specific needs. 



13 






ko Central services, other than data processing, eould be 

expanded and improved, as a separate organisation reporting 
to a chief executive, to provide for city-wide: (l) inter- 
department messenger service; (2) central mailing (as far as 
possible); (3) central reproduction and duplicating; 
(4) central typing, etc 

5. As previously pointed out, the present purchasing organisa- 
tion does not conform to good functional arrangement, either 
in public Jurisdiction or in private enterprise. The vide 
diversity of functions and activities now performed by the 
purchasing department is indicated on Exhibit I 



Recommendations 

* 1. The purchasing and storing activities be organised and 

established as a separate functional subdivision of a 
central Finance Department and administered by a pro- 
fessionally trained and experienced purchasing agent 
reporting to the Department Bead. 

* 2, The present central garage and shops be reorganized as a 

separate Motorized Equipment Department and administered by 
a highly trained and experienced Motorized Equipment Man: 
reporting to the Mayor. 

* 3° The scope of the reorganized Motorized Equipment. Depart;. 

be increased and expanded to include responsibility for 1 
"ownership" maintenance and repair of all automobiles, t 
and other motorized equipment used by all City departments 
(exclusive of buses and trolley coaches). 

* ho A centralized Automobile Pool be established under the 

Motorized Equipment Department. 

* 5« Working capital funds be established for the Motorized Equip- 

ment Department, sufficient to defray initial operating 2 
over a 3-month period, such funds to be reissbursed by charges 
made to the various departments for equipment usage and 
gasoline. Appropriations covering charges to departments 
to be appropriated in the respective departmental budgets. 

* 6.. An appropriate accounting system be designed and installed 

for the Motorized Equipment Department in order to prr 
accurate information and develop necessary operating cost 
data for: (l) billing of departments for gasoline, etc. 
(2) establishing operating cost data per vehicle and fleet 
to be used for comparisons and as a guide for replacements. 



* Charter change 7»y be necessary. 



I' 






* 7. The present separate locations and installations of mechani- 

cal tabulating equipment be consolidated and centralized to 
the fullest extent as a separate Central Data Processing 
Division to be administered by an expertly trained and 
experienced Data Processing Manager reporting to the head 
of the Finance Department. The installation and use of 
Electronic Data Processing Equipment be effectuated as 
rapidly as possible. 

* 80 The present central services facilities be completely 

reorganised and expanded in scope and kinds of services 
rendered in order to accommodate the needs of all City 
departments, under a trained and experienced Central 
Services Manager reporting to the Mayor, to provide such 
services as: (l) inter-departmental and inter-building 
messenger service, (2) reproduction and printing, 
(3) central mailing, (k) typing, stenographic, and 
clerical pool, etc. 

* 9o The Central Purchasing Division be reorganized to consist 

of three subdivisions: Bureau of Purchasing, Bureau of 
Stores and Supplies, and Office and Clerical Section. 



* Charter change may be accessary, 

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. II - 

BURE AUS OF BUYING, PER30HKEL AKD ACCOUNTS 

Page 

Findings 17 

Buying Activities 17 

Processing Requisitions and 

Preparing Purclase Orders 20 

Processing Bids, Tabulations, 

and Contracts 21 

Timekeeping and Payrolls 22 

Budgetary Control Accounting 22 

Recoiraendations 23 



16 



11 • bureaus or buhkGj mtsamsLj -sp _aoc justs 

Findings 

Buying Activities 

Buying activities do not appear to be properly organised or 
administered for greatest efficiency or the rsnderirg of prompt 
services to the using departments, agencies and offices. 

lo Purchasers are presently devoting a ransldfi ruble portion of 
their time to routine and trivial purchasixg procedures 
normally performed, by clerical persoanel. 

2. There is a lag of 2 to 10 days in pracesslrg a Requisition 
for Purchare Order from the requesting deperianent to the 
Buying Bureau cff ice, largely due to lack cf foraalised, 
planned and scheduled messenger service ani delay in 
approving and encumbering the request, docusent at the 
source. 

3° Sorting and distribution of Requisitions is. the Buying 

Bureau do riot receive sufficient attention an to separating 
those applying to blanket contracts in force from those 
" requiring new purchases . 

Sorting and routing Requisitions against blanket contracts 
already in force to clerk- typist personnel would laa-adi- 
ately relieve the specialized Purchasers for important 
buying and related duties. 

4. Requisitions for items involving small amounts should net 
be processed by the Buying Bureau. Such purchases should 
be made directly by the requisition], \g department from 
the vendors. 

5. The tabulations listed below recapitulate the purcha.ee 
orders for the calendar year ended December ;Q., i960 
It should be noted that: 

a„ Purchases of $25 or less required 10,007 separate 
Purchase Orders totaling $156,020 or an ever age 
of $15.59 per order. Thus 23*> a? the total 
Purchase Orders issued were required to purchase 
0.9$ of the total value of all purchases. 



IT 



Purchase;* of $100 or less required £6,769 separate 
Purchase Orders W<;alir>g $1,122, 570. STsus 61.5$ of the 
total Pvrchase Orders Issued were required to purchE.se 
6.7$ of the total value of all purchase s 

Perq& n-te 3^ of Tota>l Value of Pur cLasas 
i iy Value Groupings 



Value 
Classification 

Under $25* 
25 - 50 
50 - 75 

under |1C 
100 - 500 
50D - 1000 
1030 -. oyer 
Total 



TOt-al 
Value 

$ 156,020 
336,100 
282,000 



2,TO673W 
1,621,400 



"£ of Value of Accuaailatecl 

Total Pu rchases j> of Total 



0.9 
2.0 
17 
2.1 

2Z 



0o9 

2.9 
4.6 



1675 
9*6 

100.0 



23 .2 

32.8 
100.0 



Value of 
_ 2ach 

Unier $25* 
25 - 50 
50 - 75 
73 _- 100 
ynJer~flbO 
103 - 500 
500 - 1000 
1030 = over 



■>er of Purchase Orders Issued 
By Value Groupies" 



Number 
Issued 

10,007 
8,562 
4,409 

3!E 



23=0 

19.7 
10,1 

8,7. 



11,992 
2,258 



6175" 

27 X 



Accumulated 
c: r Total 



23.0 
42. T 
52.8 
61.5 




159 JT 
94.3 

100.0 



* Details of selected purchases tabulated for J he pur chasing 
agent included as 'ay purchase orders fee amounts of 3«3S 
than tvo dollars. 

6. Further redaction of the regaining purchase requisitions 
could be and* by insisting that the requesting departaeat 
f irst check .tu local storeroom and the Central Warehouse 
catalog in c .*de-r to eatissuet. the possibility es for stores 
Issuances of soias or all. of the requested i.tfsms or 
acceptable e ibt titution of other similar items*, 



18 






7« Stvtfy of Requisitions ?or new purchases could "be continuously 
made to determine If teems could be procured under blari-iet 
contracts by modifying existing contracts or establishing 

new agreements . 

8. Consideration of all tie above elements von ill materially 
reduce the number of Requisitions handled tmd remove the 
existing backlog of th-sse documents, which in a number of 
instances -aere found to date from one week to one and one- 
half months after the time received in the Buying Burea u« 

In other lass frequent cases, dealing principally with 
equipment, machinery, etc., the delay vae observed to be 
from two to six months. These delays are reported to be 
caused by budgetary restrictions on equipment buyingo 

9. It should be the principal concern of the Purchasing Agent 
and the Buying Bureau to concentrate on the r»re important 
aspects of the buying activities . 

10. Initiating, handling as-vi processing Requisitions for indi- 
vidual or departaaental telephone services each month, 
together vita the subsequent preparation of Purchase Orders 
and related invoicing on an individual departmental imas 
could be eliminated. 

The similar processing of other utility services, such cs 
water, gas. and electric, each month, is uraecessary am. 
could he eliminated. It was stated that efforts to improve 
this situation vere unfer way. 

11. In general, the present Purchasers cceqpl&ir. that fuUy half 
of the Requisitions received from using departments are not 
well prepared, having either too little or too much informa- 
tion and often incorrect descriptions, opacifications, 
quantities, prices, etc . 

12 o According to Purchasers, Requisition i for th*> same 

commodities must be kept separate by appropriations in the 
various depart&ents, rc.thsr than bei:ig consolidated int< a 
single transaction and the invoiced .--aso-afc later dictril a ';ed 
to the users by coding. 

13 • In general the appearance, arrangement and a^er-ail ^ork 
practices and "housekeeping" in the Purchasing Bureau 
were observed to be so&ewhat unsatisfactory and 
disorganised, possibly due to lack of spas* and fi! 
facilities for records, catalogs, ete. 



19 






Wider c vion could be given to th< 

bids and -one raintenance of lists of vendors (prospect 

bidders), especially out°of-tovn sources. 

It was observed that In certain cases purchases were being 
made throu|;h brokers rather than direct from manufacturers . 

Processing Requisitions and P re paring Purchase Orde rs 

1. The sortie; of Requisitions into k- major departmental 
categories and accumulating them in batches <>f kO each 
for transmittal to typists to prepare the Purchase Orders 
tends to contribute to delaying the purchaslijg process. 

2. The proofreading by one employee of Purchase Orders typed 
"by k typists, is urirealistic considering tha ; the average 
number to be proofed is about £0 per houTo 'Consequently 
the proofing must usually be reduced to mere scanning of 
a backlog of unprcofed requisitions somstimeo permitted 
to accumaU-teo 

3- The transmittal of all Purchase Orders to the Controller 
for pre-eneumberiug departmental appropriations and the 
approval of their issuance would not be necessary if 
encumbering authority ■sere delegated to the department 
level; under Controller audit. 

In fact, 3?etty Purchase Orders (normally les» than $100) 
are not processed iu the above manner but are encumbered 
in the Purchasing Department against departmental revolv^ 
ing funds vithia semi-monthly limitations, suggesting the 
establishment of a similar departmental responsibility for 
encumbering all Requisitions at the departmental level 
as an inherent responsibility of the department head. 

4. The processing of procurement documents could more properly 
be divided as follows; 

a« Req-cds:.tioning at the department level. 

b. Pre- encumbering of appropriations at the departmental 
level, under rules prescribed by the Controller and 
subject to his periodic audit. 

c. Authorisation of Purchase Orders b •rchasing 
Agent alone. 

d. Checking of invoices by the Purchasing A^ent, 

e. Authorization of payment of invoices by Controller, 

f. Accounting for expenditures by Controller. 



20 






5- A combined purchasing activity involving aaaa kk 9 i 
chase Orders per year amounting to a total o? ate 
$17,000,030 entails the problesi of efficient expediting 
to assure }?rompt processing of all tlceva.snts and subsequent 
deliveries,, This is presently the responsibility of the 
individual Purchasers . However, the proper Mcpediting of 
the purchasing procedure sight better be performed by one 
employee functioning as an expeditor<> 

6. The necessity for Maintaining current files >f Purchase 
Orders for 3 years, plus k years additional In the central 
records storage, is not apparent. The time period night be 
shcrtened to permit reduction of these voluminous records, 
at least in the current files if not in the central records 
storage. 

Processi ng Bids, Tabulations and Contracts 

1. In observing the processing in this Bureau or Informal 
Quotations (for purchases of $1,000 ox less jf non- 
proprietary articles or services) it was not 3d that the 
proposal f ansa are usually sent to a aiidaum of 3 vendors. 
A copy of tie informal quotation is also aada available at 
the public counter for inspection by any vendor. 

So Certified checks which ascospanv the bids, often aceuXat- 
lag to a considerable nnasfcer, are held in a regular letter 
file, rather than in a more protective and safe repository 
such as a vault or safe. 

3. Separate service contracts, such as for office equipment 
maintenance and others, covering an annual period, are 
made by the various departments and agencies s Separate 
monthly Requisitions for each contract require separate 
processing . With such forscal service agreemsnts in effect , 
it would appear possible to merely require the department's 
signature on the company's "service call tic sets," 
forwarded to the Purchasirg Department (without formal 
Requisition) for atiditing a consolidatet invoice for the 
period, covered and transmittal to the Controller for pay- 
ment. The costs could be coded and distributed to the 
accounts of the department concerned,. It was reported 
that attests were being made to simplify this procedure. 

Because these annual servl.ee agreements appear to vary 
considerably, based on departments' Individual needs or 
requests, there seems to be a need to review the entire 
equipment servicing program in order to achi 
uniformity and consolidation. 



21 



PURCB 



k„ The maintenance of separate "revolving fund" accounts by the 
Purchasing Department for most of the Asparfcaents, together 
with all the related detailed procedures now required, would 
be unnecesscry if the responsibility for making petty pur- 
chases were delegated to the respective department heads, 
under a locel inxrchase order procedure * Under this procedure 
the properly signed receiving copies, together with the 
correspondirg vendor invoices, could be reviewed and 
approved by the Purchasing Department ard transmitted 
to the Controller for payment. 

Timekeeping and Payrolls 

Present practice varies from daily non-uniform time slips on an 
individual or group lasis, which ray or may not be signed o 
supervisor, to checking Purchasing Department ofi'iiie personnel 
attendance by the clerk . 

Present timekeeping and reportitig does not conform to good 
positive timekeeping practices . 

I- Daily approval of each individual employee B s time by his 
iaaediate sitpervisor and the preparation of a weekly 
corsolidatec'; time report, approved and rigned by sucii 
supervisor, would be prims facia evidence cf actual time 
worked and form the basis for semi-monthly time»roll 
preparation. 

2» Employees aj'e now required to personally' sign the roll 

upon receiving their semi-monthly pay checks- This useless 
and obsolete practice could be discontinued, and the eorres° 
spending work interruptior and loss of time: avoided* 

3<> With proper timekeeping forms and pro* 

and. preparation of the seti-monthly t b and relate - 
personnel procedures for ebout 115 employees vould sot 
require the exclusive attention of one clerk., 

Budgetar y Control Accounting 

It is generally desirable to saJntain budgetary accounting and 
control records at tie departmental level as a narageaant control 
tool but the systems and procedures should be uniformly established 
and audited, by the Controller and periodically reconciled with the 
central fiscal recorcs in the Finance Department. 

!<, While such departmental budgetary control records are kept 
in the Pur closing Department they are not closed at regular 
monthly Intervals and consequently exe not always currently 
reconciled vith the Controller's statements. 



22 



2 c Two principal be) 

accurately caintained departmental budgetary control and 
accounting records; 

a. They should sigiil and guard against over-encumbrances 
in all budgetary appropriation accounts, preferably on 
a monthly basis either against monthly, quarterly or 
annual allotments of funds. 

bo Monthly "budgetary status" statements should shov, both 
in terns of amounts ani percent, the extent to which 
each account has conformed with or devia'-ed from the 
established appropriations, together with an explanation 
of all substantial deviations, for the month, quarter and 
fiscal year to date<. 

3= Under existing circumstances, it is probable that the full 
time of an accounting employee is not now required* 

It May be possible to consolidate the personnel, ,>ayrolL and. 
budgetary accounting duties above discussed as the exclusive 
responsibility of one employee. 

RecoiBaenciat i ons 



lo All unnecessary routine clerical vork be eliiiinated from the 
duties of the Purchasers and thereafter their vork be 
confined to actus! purchasing procedures B 

S< The processing of Requisitions for Purchase Order forms be 
expedited through full use of the recommend:- 
services <> 

3« Assigning Requisitions to Purchasers for routine commodi iiee 
already covered by currently active blanlaet contracts be dis- 
continued ani, instead, these be routed to assistants for 
routine processing, thus relieving the Purchasers for more 
important work. This reportedly was the previous practiiie 
but could not be continued because of staffing difficulties „ 

* h, Requisitions for trivial aid low-cost items costing less than 
$103 be discontinued and the initiating department be 
granted authority to make such purchases locally by use of 
a standard pre~numbered "Local Purchase Order" form and a 
procedure established therefor. 



* Charter change may be necessary. 



23 



'.jsxm 



All requests for purchases be processed by t.he initiating 
department as follows; 

a. The availability of items in local storeroom stocks be 
checked first, as a rigidly enforced procedure* 

b. The availability at t.5ie Central Warehouse be checkec 
by consulting the warehouse ea : ;&Iog> 

Co If not stocked by the Central Warehouse, thet>. the Buyers 
Guide be consulted to determine If :Lte25£ are covered by 
blanket purchase agreements, iu order to reduce new 
purchases to a minimum. 

* dc Purchases up to $25 in iralue may be raads from 

departmental revolving funds, without processing a 
requisition through the Central. Purchasing Division o 

* «o Petty purchases of items amounting to less than $100 be 

made directly by departi«nts, using a pre-numbered Petty 
Pur<2hase Order. 

* f . Requisi 'lions for purchases in excess of $100 be 

submitted to the Central Purchasing Division. 

o. Requisitions for purchases be processed by the Central 
Purchasing Division as follows: 

* So Purchases of $100 to $500 be me.de through soliciting 

quotations by telephone or by the "Jjafersal quotations" 
procedure currently in iise. 

(Greater solicitation of telephone quotations be mads f 
properly recorded and t«ist audited at regular intervals, 
in order to decrease the time required tr> make these 
types of purchases.) 

* bo Purchases of $500 to $2=00 be jsade through solicitation 

of written "Inform! Quotations" in conformance with 
established procedure. 

* Co Purchases in excess of $2500 be made by :?orma'l si*aled 

bids in accordance with legal requirements and 
established procedures as is done in many Calif o* 

cities o 

d. All the foregoing purchasing categories lie subject to 
audit o 



** Charter change may be necessary « 



2k 






7» -..lorui for new purchases be r.ubjec 

scrutiny to determine If the type: of ccumodl be 
stocked to setter advantage or procured under birr 
pui chase agreements 8 

6v Prccessirg Requisitions b« expedited to the greatest extent 
possible in order to reduce the time Interval during vhlch 
tbfse documents are now 8 at times, permitted to accumulate 
awaiting action. 

9o With tea elimination of all unnecessary routine clerical 
work and sssill purchases, maximum use be made of thr 
Purchasers for the mere i!©orbant aspects of purchasing, 
including: (l) standards and specJ.fica-frf.ons. (2) nego- 
tiations vi';h prospective vendors, (3) tfecvaring increased 
competition.-, (h) conferring and cooperai-.in, i id,th requesting 
departments on jtaportant, specialised and technical scatters, 
(5, studying market conditions and deteraixiing most favorable 
buying tiaeo, (6) searching for better end cheaper sources of 
supply of satisfactory substitute items at mere favorable 
prices, and (7) determining the fullest extent to wblch needs 
can be poolesd, and bulk, bv^ring resorted to on the most 
economical liasis- 

* 10c The present practice of initiating, bantling and pre .easing 

Individual monthly departesental Requisitions and Purchase 
Qrclars Tor -telephone services and other utilities already 
covered by i-egular continuing agreementf be discontinued 
and preferally consolidated invoices be prccessed direct 
for payzent, 

11. In-? crud;ionf. be prepared safe issued to ell departments 

re^u'dizsg methods and procedures for correctly and completely 
preaericig Requisitions, aiid meetings conducted with the 
responsible personnel to assure understanding and adherence 
to such procedures, thus relieving the Purchasers and 
related clerical personnel of considerable unnecessary 
tic a and. effort . 

* 12. The present practice of requiring separate Re13uis.ltJ.ons to 

be prepared for each appropriation code te di scontin ied as 
being unseal istie and unnecessary from either a purchasing 
or accounts* g standpoint „ 



* Cliarter change mey be necessary. 



25 



ISHfG 



sed ersph .oxs V.a ■ :i^en to esteblisllng; and maintaining 
li£ ts of vendors and prospective bidders aid expandiag such 
lifts -fco the fullest extent for both local and out-o-?-town 
soirees and maintaining them on a current basis. 

"Irforaal Quotations" and telephone quotations be requested 
by selecting; minimum groups of 2 vendors- in. consecutive 
ore sr until the list is exhausted, after which the procedure 
be repeatedc These tvo vendors be in addition to ths two 
lev bidders on the last previous pvrdsaee of the ite^s), 
where available, it being the intention to hrve a aliimum 
of three bidders- 

2.ko Purchasing assistants, instead of Purchasers, be utilised to 
obtiin quotations, by mail or phone, for routine purchases 
and for ordinary Information in order to conserve the 
Purchaser's time for more important matters, as elss here 
recoBnoendedc 

Pr ocessing of Procurement Documents 

lo The practies of pasting a copy of the newspaper advertlse- 
men'i of forzral bids on copies of the forms milled to 
prospective bidders be discontinued as being unneceasaryo 

* 2., The practice of preparing Requisitions and Purchase orders 

for periodic servicing of various types of offiee equipment 
used by departments throughout the C&ty, for which annual 
serriee agreements are in affect, be discontinued, the 
signature of the department receiving the service, o:? the 
sig.ied "service call" tickets being considered sufficient 
for approval acd payment of the corresponding invoices . 

The possibility of establishing an office equipment repair 
service be studied as a means of improving this activity 
at reduced costs. 

3= The period ever which central Purchase Order files are now 
kepi; current, be reduced to conserve space aad filing 
equipment o 

k. A Standards- Kxpeditor position be created to encompass the 
following duties: 

a. Standards - Establish standard specifications for 

commonly purchased itams in cooperation 
with department heads, manufacturers? etc. 

b - Sxpediti ng - Systematic follow-up of all steps of the 
procurement procedures for rlajportan?*. 
purchase orders » 

* Charter change cay be necessary » 



26 






Psra caMmel and Payrc lija 

l a ae present x-Tt.ctice of requiring the Persocnul and Payroll 
Clerk to poet daily time of Individual employes from several 
different tytees of dally time reports reeslntstl from various 
locations be discontinued* A consolidated weekly time report, 
approved and signed by the respective supervisory be dr'iaed 
as a basis for preparation of the send-monthly payroll s» 

2o She requirement that employees "sign the payroll" upon 

receiving their sead "monthly salary checks be discontl aued» 

3» £he duties of the present Payroll and Personnel Clerk be 
combined with those of the Accountant* and the former 
position eliminated o 

Budgetary Control Accounting 

1. 2he procedure- of maintaining Purchasing BepEuriment budget 
appropriation control through pi-e-encumbrsncra of aecotato be 
continued anc. j^eorciled with, the Controller 's reportca 

2. Monthly budget stetus statements be prepared for the 
information of the Purchaser of Supplies anil others ccn<^rned, 
indicating the unencumbered balances in each -pproprif t:Loia, 
comparisons with standards for the period and year to date, 
rmd explanations of important variables., Tin :e matters be 
made the regultu: responsibility of the ac constant 

* 3* The encumberiafj of all Purchase Orders ard the final 

authorization for their issiasnee in the Controller's Ie;?art» 
aent be eliminated in view of the fact that >idget aptrspi*ia-» 
tier, encumbrance records are being maintained at the c"e;*trt«» 
ment level in a more current status. Such cle.partaeattl 
records be subject to regular periodic audit and recor c Llia- 
tic© with tlie Controller's brsic fiscal bzS. accounting 
controls. 

* ko Concurrently with the fore&oingp the practice of havitg 'she 

Purchasing Department maintain a series of (lepartmentc 1 
'molving funds" for eneusibering "Petty Purchase Orders" 
witldn semi-riouthly limitations be discontiiuid, and lull 
responsibility for eacumberiiag purchases be placed with the 
Initiating depnrtKent head as a normal administrative 
requirement » 



* Charter change may be necessary* 



27 



* 1. On the haste ocT '..he previous recoaauBodaidoris^ the 

rac.-oisition^'Jig, purchasing and accounting responsibi d. iies 
and, procedui'ee "be divided as folloirs: 

&, Requisitioning at the departmental ltzvt-1. 

b. Pre-enoi^abering of appropriation accounts at the 
departwintal level, subject to audit, by Controller. 

c. Purchases be aade by Departaents ant', tins Purchasing 
BapartJoent in accordar.ee with pro jeci»re-3 outline! in 
paragraphs 5 and 6 of the Beccoaaeadeticns on Buying 
Activities o 

do Checking of vendor invoices by Pu?elani»<? Bepartaento 

e. Audit and paynent of invoices by '3or.treller« 

f o Accounting and control of expenditures by Controller. 

go KcnthJy reconciliation by departments cf their 
enetaahr&ace records with statements prepared by 
the Controller. 



* Charter change say be necessary . 



2d 






- Ill - 

BUREAU OF EQHIFMENT AMD SUPPLUS 



Findings 30 

General 30 

Physical Aspects of Storing 30 

Control^, Replenishment, Issuance and Accountability 32 

Personnel end Work Ssrformance $k 

Automobile Inventor;; - Control 3^ 

Other Equipment Inventory Control 3^ 

Materials and Supplies Inventory Control 35 

Recommendations 37 
Exhibit H - Chart of Proposed Purchasing Department 



29 



IIIo 3URFAU Qg EQUIPMEiffJ MP 3UPPIJES 

Finding b 

General 

This organizational subdivision of toe Purcha>jia{$ Department in- 
volves toe aUministracion of 21 storerooms in as many locations 
throughout and adjacent to the city and at He tea ifotrly (Moccasin). 
In general, the arrangement may be cLiaBifled as a "decentralised sys- 
tem" vhere the control, though apparently intended to be "centralized" 
in the Purchasing Department, is actually "fractioniiied" among many 
different using agencies. From an operating standpoint this saakes the 
actual responsibility departmental. 

1„ Ma centralized "functional" stores admliis iration by the 
Fare' laser of Supplies and the decentralized "departmental" 
stores operation at many scattered locations las mode and con- 
tinues to make it difficult to obtain the efficient and 
economical storefceeping methods and results accessary to the 
following phases of good storekeepiags 

ao Physical aspects of storing and handling commodities, 
materials and supplies and, 

b. £ontxol, replenishment, issuance and accountability for 
items and qtsantitfaa stored. 

2. In general, from obnervaticaa made at all of "f&e locations, 
with a few exceptions, it arost be concluded -Stat when measured 
against normally recognized good storekeepinij; practices, a 
great deal of improvement is necessary in boch the above- 
mentioned phases before good storekeeping and control are 
achieved „ 

Physical Aspects of Storing 

Hie location, space requirements, design, coa3 traction and layout 
of so many specific stores facilities to serve the netnis of so large 
and far-flung an organization as the City and Couity vould norraally 
require professional consideration of each storing futility in order 
to ade.pt it to the specific requirements ae to what, vhere 3 how end 
how much is to bs stored. 

It is reported that management ha j recommended ln5>rovements in 
physical facilities; however, these recommendations have not yet been 
implemented. 

1. 55iere is little evidence that such pre-pljaa.Liig has been 

applied consistently to the stores system; notable exceptions 
being at several of the Municipal Railway locations, and to 
a leaser extent at others o 



30 



PUBCHASIHB 



$&&,* where new facilities bave bees, only recently constructed, 
s;-?p.ai3i3 has been placed on the structure raider than on the 
ability or suitability of the space to acjosrax •lav.e the present 
and Tuture storing needs. 

Under the circumstances, at both old and .sew ctorerooms, the 
pro") Lea is how best to utilise the spaces available. This has 
been achieved with varying degrees of success from very poor to 
very good., em summarized belov: 

a. Buildings where storerooms located o Prom dilapidated, over- 
age tiooden structures 
to new reinforced concrete brick and steel buildings ., 

bo Storeroom layout . Unsatisfactory la many instances; fair 
to good in others. 

e. Shelving,, bins, racks, et c. Considerable old makeshift 

vooden unitn; poor to satis- 
factory vooden units at other places; sow; steel units, 
especially in Municipal Railway locations » 

d. Identification and location of stored item s. Well done in 

some in - 
stances, but in a number of cases no studied consideration 
has been gives to this very important aspect of storing, 
there being no uniform or systematic approach to proper 
bins and shelving marking in order to identify and locate 
the items quickly and accurately by naase, number or code 
designations . 

e» Storing cethods in use . Standardized uniform practices 

for stocking, piling and arrang- 
ing items on shelves, in bins and on floo.-s are not gener- 
ally adhered to, producing a vide range o:f results .from 
inattention to good housekeeping, depacdJjig largely on the 
initiative and interest of the individual storekeepers. 

f . Materials handling equipment . Hand and power-operated 

equipment, such as flat, 
trucks, handlift trucks, forklifts, etc., are not la conusor 
use although opportunities occur for their adaptation in 
handling, transporting and placing heavy and bulk-packaged 
items. 



31 






go Safety and protection , ta general, tie protectio 

stock* against ai.i uxz2. e is 

lood; however, leaking roofs and dtj^p fleers were acted in 
lome locations o In a f<iw instances, while doors and gates 
were equipped with loeku, they were obaemed left open or 
unguarded c In other imitaoces thei-e app<:cr to be acre 
raeans of l-ngress and egress than are rest»cnafcly necessary 
considering the size, use and activity. In general, it 
appears that vandalism :Ls not a serious problem. 

k° '' storage yard s. There ai*e a number of storage yards, either 
adjacent to storeroom;) or at separate 
locations In general, they are enclosed with high chain* 
link fencas topped with strands of ba&ed wire. In some 
Ins fcaa.ee s > however ? the yard areas are not fenced ox are 
only partially enclosed, Arrangement of c tored materials 
Is poor ia some instances <> 

i» Storage of inflamBBbles . Provisions .Tor ctoring bulk oils, 

gasoline in containers, and other 
hazardous items could be given greater attention in several 
instances ia order to comply with reasonable safety 
requirements. 

Control,, Iteplen ishmsnty Issuance and Accountabil ity 

With the above general evaluation of the physica\ storing facili- 
ties, good stock control, inventorying, record keeping; and oversell 
stores accountability cannot be achieved under exist: .rg circumstances. 

1. The;?! is a lack of consideration of basic location and identi- 
fication of ifceas carried in stock at Eome sxres locations. 
To -iie extent that they do exist, the procedures are not con- 
sistent and u^ifora in all ntorerooms. 

2. The extent to which such battle records are absent or incom- 
plete reflect? directly and proportionately on all subsequent 
storeroom operations and inventory control assures. Quenti- 
ties on hand caaaot be accurately repoited s 'ius accurate 
inventory control becomes extremely diffi«ml-.< 

3» Stores issuance forms and procedures axe not uniform. 

h u In many instances where im^itory record oysi^ms have been in- 
stalled, they are not maintained up-to-dais fcc reflect current 
balances on bind. Such deluysd postings vert; observed to be 
fron a few days to six months in arrears. In other instances, 
where inventory records wer« current, lack of issuance activity 
(turnover) indicated the poaslbility of e.'.imr-ratlng sue": items ; 



32 



PURCHASUB3 



In other cases the rate of issuance had been c© slow that from 
six months' to several years' supply was bein$; carried on hand 
Such occurrences point to the opportunity for aarked reduction 
of balances on band so that money invested in unnecessary in- 
ventories could be reduced 'so a minimucio 

5<> Minimum quantity standards for balancer "on !ie.ad" and re-order 
quantities ars generally not shown' on the ijrrentory control 
cards nov in use, when requisitioning stock :.eolenishmentao 

60 The policy or practise for re-ordering is no-: clearly defined, 
b\it appears to rest primarily on the opinion end judgment of 
the storekeeper* and in a number of instance:; is based on 
three to nine months' periods due to the timo interval experi- 
enced in processing the regular requisitioning and purchasing 
documents o This seems to be a general coraplnint at se/tral 
departmental locations » 

7 c There appears to be a lack of anticipating netis and schedul- 
ing requests for similar commonly used items to assist pur- 
chasers by reducing the number of separate tre-nsactions c 

80 The frequency with which conraonly used items ^re observed to 
be carried in local stores points to a lack of consideration 
feeing given to the accepted principle of combining all such 
nseds for advantageous bulk purchasing and ouatral storicgo 
Some of this has been done, but much more ae^s to be done, 

9« No complete catalog of all coamjodities stored at the Central 
Warehouse exists o A stationery catalog was irsued in 
Dsceriber, 19o0 o 

10 o All requisitions are not checked for availability 

- squested items or satisfactory substitutes in the dej;: 
tiantal storeroom or Central Warehouse in order? to avoid 

vtv shapes. 

11 o The existing situation appears to warrant a ti ©rough study 
of all items on hand at all locations to establish: 

a Their need 

bo Mnimum quantities required on hand 
c , ;?olicy for re-ordering 

do Commonly used items for bulk buying and central, storing 
e, .Seduction of the number aid value of invortory items, to 
a minimum 



33 



^mc 



Per 

a vide: o ivergence in the abilities, initiative, and personal 
interns; among the storekeeping personnel -was observed. This results 
in a marked difference in the quality and amount cf work performs! 
This may stem partially from a lack of direction end supervision. 
This observation is substantiated bys 

1. Abserce of statistical records and reports of .workload or 
work performance to indicate the relative storeroom activities, 
flow and handling of receiving;, issuing acd jssquisitio 
documents, nuriber of items issued 9 number of items received, 
number and value of items on hand, etc. litln rakes it diffi- 

It to evaluate position ard staffing require nents. 

2. Based somewhat upon rough approximations of nuch data., where 
at least partially available,, it appears thai; some locations 
are overstaffed. Similarly the comments hewrd at several loca~ 
tions on the need for additional personnel d:.d not appear to 
be justified on the basis of the nature, caliber, or quantity 
of -work being performed by present incumbentn . 

3» Tiiere appears to be need for closer and tighter supervision 
the storekeeping level acd it may be that this cannct be 
had under the present system of "functional" direction. 

Automo bile Inventory Control 

This activity is concerned with: 

a, Inventory of Automotive Equipment 

bo Registering and Licensing of Automotive Equipment 

Co Insuring Automotive Equipment 

1. E;-£am: nation o.'f the forms, methods and procedures folio-* ed in 
maintaining the automobile inventory control indicates tl 
this portion of equipment inventory is we] J. done and kept in 
current status, in conjunction with i^ia X.B.H. Tabulating 
Bureau located in the City Hall, covering all units on hand, 
t:rade~ins, sales and new purchases. 



Other Ec uipt aent Inventory and Control 

This eetivity includes the maintenance of inventor:/ records of all 
categories of equipment £ other than automotive equipment. 

lo While inventories of fcheae grcupe of equipment had at one time 
been established and maintained, the practice was discontinued 
arout 1956«5T reportedly due to la^k of sufficient field and 
officer personnel and to policy decisions to emphasize other 
work. 



3^ 



;&im 



2 It was reported that the dosvKBents covering <J.ie receipt issu- 
ance end transfer of items uspon which such group inventories 
are !»ased, have been preserved and filed. 

3o la general, it would be necessary to p-.-ocess all of these ac- 
tions subsequent to the last date of tl»e lated I B.M<> 
inventory tabulations in order to bring tae control records 
up-to-date o SHiis in itself would not completely discharge the 
inventory responsibility and accountability,, 

k-o The work could not be considered complete unless and until a 
reconciliation were effected between the quantities on hand at 
the various locations and tie book record?, 

c , . She 3cope and extent of such a project would require special 
personnel assigned to this specific task until a recor filia- 
tion is effected „ 

6. Such records could thereafter be maintained in current and 

complete status,, including physical count? by each department's 
regular personnel at regularly scheduled intervals These 
could then be reconciled with the control records and ihe 
causes of the differences determined <> 

Materials ;and Supp l ies Inventory C ont rol 

A somewhat similar situation as the above, exists in conjunction 
with the maiateaaace of current and reconciled inventories of materials 
and supplies at the various storekeeping locations with the exception 
of the Municipal Railway locations ;md a few othe:i*a 

1. Management has recognized tJxe need for betterj.ag this situa- 
tion and has assigned a highly trained and experienced l' ore- 
keeping emplo?/ee to assist the Supervisor of Equipment and 
Supplies in concivicting studies and making installatior 
the '?arious storerooms 

2» Eiis employee has previously been in charge of the Municipal 
Rail->ay Stores cbove referred to and was :,-espc>asible for the 
installation of most of the basic forme, records and proce- 
dures in the storerooms thetiselves and fo.\* tbe maintenance of 
central inventory files and records by which they are 
controlled „ 

3« The consistent application of the same techniques to all store- 
keep:Lng, inventory lag and reporting procedure e would gi^atly 
improve the existing situation, providing that- all storekeep- 
ing inventory records are reconciled with the central con- 
trols at regular intervals - 









A review of the Halted statistical, data that vas available 

ag inventory value and tuonthly usage at various storage 
0:03, indicated excessive, obsolete end/or slow moving 

invertories,, $hi3 is shoun by the following tabulation: 



Location 

Municipal IteiL wayj 
(General Stores 
Potraro Stores 
Shth & Utah 

Wat er Departme nts 
Biyant Street 
end Pipe Yard 
Eetch Hetclry 

Central Warehouse 



M' •nicipal Airport 



Inventory 
Valus 


Monthly 
issues 


iths Stock 
on Hnnd 


$328 ? 
88, SCO 
210, 000 


$18,200 

fc„700 

23.., 200 


l8d 

18,8 

9*9 


W^QOO 
50,000 


S9»h00 
^,000 


7^ 

12.5 


95,000 


16,600 


5-7 


19,300 


2,000 


9°7 


. 220,000 


38,500 


5.7 


71,600 


3,550 


20,2 



5 -nlw^al Shops 

2 -P&pfojgQ'fc of PAblic 

Works " 89,&)0 12,250 7.3 

Rmts^eiaent explained that in natty cases recODnsadatioiK: to dis- 
pose of obsolete stores havs not always been adopted <> 

5» With stocks o:a hand sufficient to serve f*.*om 5»7 to 20,2 months 
normal seeds 3 it is estimated, based on these limited stst 
ticis,? that considerable savings could be effected by reducing 

e inventories to six or four months usage . Part of this 
reduction would reault fro© elimination of obsolete melierials 
which should t*e sold ox* junked « A considerate portion of the 
rsduetion hovsver would restjlt in lower r«plecement resjuirc- 
mWrZ during the period recruited to adjust to lower 
inventories « 

60 A comparison of the statistics available on tl.e val* 

annual issues at various storeroom locations vith the annual 
cost of staffing the storerooms discloses a siibstantiel varia- 
tion from a low of 3$ to a 3iigh of 7^ . ■ tloa of 

vtion is due to the nat'ire and relative unit costs of the 
items issued. It was also pointed ouL. th*t li^e amounts cf 
rscratsitioning and salvage operations conducted by different 
storerooms varied substantially o 



J6 



I coa'parison of the present inventory values vj.tu the annual 
cost of staffing the store rcoms discloses a variation from 5$ 
to kit*, Suggested reductions In inventories on hand vouid 
result in even greater variations in this relationship. 

Re comae ncations 

Phy s ical Aspects of Storing 

lo A complete analysis of the physical storekeeping facilities at 
each separate location be K3.de to ascertain uhe need sod 
adequacy of the facilities, including: 

a. Determining need for building replacement* rehabilitation 
and/or repairs « 

bo Redesigning and improving space layouts. 

Co Casigoiug.; reconstructing and/or replacing bins, shelving, 
racks, etc., to conform with standard practices* 

do Adopting uniform methods and procedures for the proper 

identification and location of all stored items to facili- 
tate issuing, receiving and inventorying. 

e. Providing standard uniform methods, procedures and instruc- 
tions for good storekeeping and enforsing oomDliance . 

f o Providing customary hanS. and power material handling tools 
and equipment, as necessary. 

g. Providing adequate protection against damage from the ele- 
ments, theft, and vandalism as applying to both storerooms 
and storage yards. 

h. Providing special precautions and firs safe storage for 
inflammables, in accordance with applicab3.e building, fire 
and safety codes.. 

Control a Biplenishaent, Iss u ance and Accountability 

lo Satisfactory, uniform records for establishing and maintaining 
continuous acaountability &M responsibility for all items at 
all locations be provided in order to achieve accurate inven- 
tory control. 

2. She personnel in charge of each storeroom be held strictly 
responsible and accountable for completeness end accuracy of 
toe atores an 2 inventory records, procedures end reports. 

loe installed system of storekeeping and iavsttory records and 
procedures be maintained in current statu/; at all times to per- 
mit auditing and checking of balances on hand! 

37 



-.,- ;-/:'.-•<: 



3c Continuing analyses be z&de of the rate of issuances of various 
Lisas from stock over definite periods to determine rapidity 
cf turnover as a basis for <!stablishing ajjd/or correcting 
reasonable minimuma to be carried on hand or items to be dis- 
continued entirely. 

kc Such minimum standard balances be posted on the respective in- 
ventory record carls to signal the need for replenishmert of 
stocks in lieu cf the present policy and procedure of relying 
in many cases on the opinion and Judgment of the storekeeper. 

5c Requisitioning policies, forms and procedures be made uniform 
taroighout, Including anticipating and scheduling definite 
date.-; for pooling needs f Or commonly used coamtodities to reduce 
"papesr worko" 

6. Complete cataLogs be prepared by separate categories of corn- 
modi' ilea stocked at the Central Warehouse and distributed to 
e .1 departments, agencies, etc 

7o A manual of procedure be prepared and maintained covering all 
phases of storekeeping and detailed duties, responsibilities 
and accountability of storekeepers and auxiliary personnel „ 

Other £ juipment Inv .- atory Control 

lo Toe raethods arad procedures in effect prior to 19*6-57 for main- 
Ining centralized inventory records of all other types cf 
equipment listed in the inventory classification by separate 
codea, be re-activated and brought up-to-date and thereafter 
k^pt in current status. 

2. Subsequently, at regular periodic intervals, the inventory 
q.5an"ities be determined by actual physical count, by depart- 
mental personnel and reconciled vith the respective control 
totals, and responsibility and accountability re-established 
for overages and shortag.es. 

Materials and Supplies Inventory Control 

lo £.ie present excellent beginning which has been made to improve 
tie entire stsrekeeping methods and inventorying procedures 
covering all materials and supplies at the separate stores 
locations be continued until uniform &nd complete systems have 
bien established and smooth and accurate operations are 
achieved. 

This favorable program be intensified by requiring existing 
storttkeeping personnel at the various store^-ociis to proceed 
with the necessary changes and improvements under adequate 
aid close supervision. 



38 



' 



2c Stocks at the Central Warehouse be expanded and this facility 
■\ aa a major depot for centralised stocks of coaaocly used 
items which can economically be purchased, atc-red and dis- 
tributed from a central warehouse , Stock:} of similar items at 
various separate locations be discontinued or reduced tr the 
minirrruEo 

3- Concurrently with the imprc^e,-nent of storckeeping methods and 
procedures, all surplus and obsolete mate:*ialr t supplier; and 
equipment be discovered, identified and eliminated from the 
stocks carries on hand. 

k* La view of the relatively hlgix cost of staff irg some minor 
storerooms, an analysis be roade to determine iiae feasibility 
cf discontinuing the operation of such storerooms operations, 
and furnishing the requirements by weekly requisition from the 
Centrcal Stores location or by direct delivery, as required* 

Oeneral 

lo *Rie materials stored at the Tire Department high pressure pipe 
y ,rd be transferred to the Weber Department pipe yard aad the 
vacated property soldo 

Proposed Organizati on 

lc Hae purchasing functions and activities be reorganized sub- 
stantially as indicated on lic'iibit II 



3d 



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ca 






BUREA U O F SHOPS 

£»g£ 

Findings kl 

General 

A - Automobile Shop k2 

B - Truck Shop '*3 

C - Fire Shop and Aerial Shop \o 

D - Ladder Shop k"J 

E -> Hose Shop kj 

F - Upholstery Shop hi 

G - Body Shop kd 
H - Machine Shop 

I - Blacksmith Shop 49 

J " Paint Shop 50 

K - Battery Shop 50 

L - Tire Shop 51 

M - Gasoline Service Station 51 

N «• Vehicle Parking and Storage Sheds 51 

Shops at Other Locations Throughout the City 53 

A - Southeast Sewage Treatment Plant Shop 53 
B " Richmond-Sunset Sewage Treatment Plant Shop 53 

C « Northpoint Sewage Treatment Plant Shop 5^ 

D « Golden Gate Park Shop 5^ 

E - Police Garage 56 

F » Motorcycle Garage 57 
G ■» Department of Public Works 

Army Street Gas Station 53 
H «• Department of Public Works 

19th Avenue Garage 59 

I - Department of Electricity Garage 59 

0' •» 15th and Harrison Street Gas Station . 60 

K - Health Department Garage 60 

Management and Accounting 6l 

Water Department Automotive Shop 63 

Municipal Railway Automotive Shop 65 

Recommendations 66 

Exhibit III ~ Chart of Proposed Centralized Motorized 
Equipment Department 



UO 




IVo BUREAU OF SHOPS 



This subdivision of the Purchasing Department is responsible for 
the servicing, maintenance and repair of about 1,300 motor vehicle 
units assigned to 3^ departments of the City-County administration, 
the work being principally carried on at the Central Shops in the 
southeastern section of the city. 

The Central Shops consist of a number of specialty units % (l) 
Automobile Shop; (2} Truck Shop: (3) Fire Engine Shop, together with 
several auxiliary shops such as Machine Shop, Blacksmith Shop, ladder 
Shop, Paint Shop, Upholstery Shop, Body and Fender Shop, Tire Shop, 
Hose Shop, and Service Station. 

'Jhe buildings and facilities are new,, having been designed and 
constructed by previous management with the intent and purpose of 
conso\idating several shops previously at separate locations ,. 

Although designed as central shops, there are a number of 
other locations throughout the city where similar mainte- 
nance, repair and/or servicing operations ere being per- 
formed: Park Shops, Hall of Justice Garage, Public Works 
Department Army Street Yard, Public vforks Department IJ^th 
Avenue Garage, Health Department Garage, Department of 
Electricity Garage, Police Motorcycle Garage, and the 15th 
and Harrison Street Service Station - 

In addition, maintenance, repair and servicing operations 
are performed by the Municipal Railway at its 2tth and Utah 
shop and by the Water Department at its Bryant Street Yard. 

2. Thus, while the Purchasing Department has the responsibility 
for centralized control and administration of the repair and 
maintenance of most departmental automotive vehicles, the 
scope of the activities still remains widely scattered and 
the span of supervision correspondingly thin. 

3« As a consequence, this over-all functional supervision over 
so many locations and different types of organizations, re- 
sults in considerable supervision on a separate departmental 
basis, presenting opportunities for jurisdictional dif- 
ferences in the exercise of supervisorial authority and/or 
lack of exercise of authority to the extent necessary to 
achieve good procedure, performance and results. 



hi 



The obvious conalusion, based on the above observations, ie 
question the effectiveness of this type or organization and 
the need for maintaining so many service and repair locations- 

Consequently, elimination or consolidation of some of these 
may be feasible, especially on completion of the new Eall of 
Justice service station. 

Automobile Shop 

Approximately U25 passenger cars and light pick-up type 
vehicles are repaired in this shop which is staffed by 1 Sob° 
Foreman Machinist, ^ Auto Machinists and 2 Garagemen 

The procedure followed is for the Foreman to inspect the 
car coming in for repair, make out a work order and assign the 
Job to an Auto Machinist o 

A system of "loaners" is being developed for issuing a 
car for use while the repairs are being made<> At present, 
there are only 5 units in this loaner fleet, 

1. On the basis of an appro;dmate breakdown of one month 's 
work, about 17 jobs are processed each working day, or 
2 k v^r mechanic per Say. Some of these are "sent out" 
to commercial garages, it being the practice to have 
major overhausl done "by annual contractual agreement,, 

2. Specialization of types of work among the mechanics is 
not resorted to, there being maximum flexibility in 
their assignment and rotation* 

3« Ko distinction is made as to the type of work done in 
this shop, as for example, between "preventive main- 
tenance" and "repairo" There is no established 
preventive maintenance program for periodically servicing 
all units o 

ho The two Oaragemen spend considerable time in making 

pickups of materials, parts and accessories from vendors 
as they are needed by the mechanics working on the 
different types of cars; it being impractical to stock a 
sufficient variety of parts for the various makes, due, 
in large part, to the lack of standardization of makes, 
types, body styles, etc. There are approximately 90 
different passenger make* models and year combinations 
in use. 



k2 






5<> Only about one»half of the available space la this s 1 - 
is being utilized a3 vorking area, the otter half being 
used for storage of vehicles awaiting repairs, indicating 
a lack of maximum utilization for actual shop purposes 

6. This lack of maximum shop utilization indicates the pos- 
sibility of consolidating some of the other service and 
repair activities at other locations previously mentioned , 
thus reducing overhead expenses chargeable to the indi* 
vidual units being serviced and repaired „ 

7o Considering the fact that this shop is located adjacent 
to the Machine Shop and Blacksmith Shop,, the assortment of 
various types of power tools and equipment is believed 
ample, especially since the larger Jobs are being sent out 
under the annual contract procedures. This shop, however, 
lacks facilities for cleaning and washing dismantled and 
dls-assembled parts and adequate testing and analyzing 
equipment,, 

Bo Truck Sh op 

This shop is engaged in the servicing, repair and 
maintenance of approximately U30 units of heavy duty trucks 
and other motorized mechanical eauixsaent such as street 
sweepers, flushers, eductors, tractors, air compressors, etc 
The staff consists of 1 Foreman Auto Machinist, 11 Auto 
Machinists and 2 Garagemeno 

In addition, 2 machinists are regularly assigned to 
"field maintenance" and repair of mechanical equipment in 
public buildings, sewage pumping stations, etc. 

The shop procedure is similar to that in the Automobile 
Shop; the foreman inspects the vehicles as they are brought 
in, determining what is to be done, px^paring the work order, 
and assigning the Job to 1 or 2 mechanics, depending upon the 
nature and scope of the work to be done* 

Id In general, the type of work done in this shop is in the 
nature of heavy equipment repair and maintenance, re- 
quiring considerably longer than repair Jobs in the Auto- 
mobile Repair Shop<> However f larger work, such as 
complete engine overhals, are; also 3ent out under the 
annual blanket contractual purchase agreements » 



*3 



2<» Actually, including those jobs sent out^ t be 

had of this shop's activity by the total number of wc 
orders processed in a given period which, during a year 
and a he If have averaged 263 per month or about 13 per work 
day or 3.2 per mechanic day„ 

3» The same machine shop and blacksmith shop are available to 
the truck shop as to the automobile shop,. Other power tools 
and equipment appear adequate for the type of work being 
done (considering that engine overhauls are sent out). 

ho The hydraulic lifts installed when the shop buildings were 
constructed are too light to handle large trucks and other 
heavy motorized units thus making this shop equipment use- 
less o 

Similarly, the overhead chain blocks and the steel beams 
from which they are suspended do not permit such heavy- 
lift ingc 

5° The concrete pits for underneath accessibility and 

servicing are also reported to have been incorrectly lo° 
cated and positioned, making their use practically negli- 
gible. 

6. These deficiencies in desinn and handling of equipment 

create a sizable handicap %o good, economical and efficient 
shop pei-f ormance . 

7° The many different types and makes of trucks and other 
heavy motorized equipment iiake it difficult., if not im~ 
practice 1, to stock an ample supply aud variety of parts 
and accessories needed in vhe maintenance and repair opera- 
tions; requiring considerable time in constantly procuring 
the required parts from loual and distant sources of supply, 
often requiring the personal time and attention of the indi- 
vidual E'Sel&nlcs, garagemeV and/or storekeeper with con- 
sequent delays in completion of the work orders Fart of 
this problem results from the fact that approximately one- 
third of the tracks are 1951 or prior models., 

As a direct result of this situation, the storeroom cannot 
fulfill its intended purpose to the fullest extent in 
serving and expediting the repair and maintenance operations » 



kk 



8. Much of the work of this 8 

fying heavy equipment units to provide changes, additions, 
and new features believed to be necessary to improve their 
utility or increase their strength for better and prolonged 
usage, flew units are often "shopped"' in this manner im- 
mediately upon their delivery from the manufacturer and 
before they are placed in actual service. 

This practice suggests possible lack of technical attention 
to design and specification requirements in preparing the 
bidding and purchasing documents for such specialized equip- 
ment; the possible over-emphasis on accepting the "lowest 
bid" to the detriment of actual performance ability: or the 
possible over-enthusiasm and "fussiness" of certain officials 
or mechanics to improvise "new gadgets" and "innovations ." 
Mana g ement explained that most such modifications result 
from veaknesses which develop from use of the equipment or 
occur on new equipment when modification after purchase is 
more economical than the added cost if modified by the manu- 
facturer. 

9» As in the Automobile Shop, the Track Shop is not being 
utilized to maximum capacity, considering the relatively 
large investment in building, equipment and facilities; 
also in view of the fact that similar work is being done in 
other locations, as for example, the Golden Gate Park Shops. 

C. Fire Shop and Aerial Shop 

This shop is engaged in the maintenance and repair of 
various types of motorized equipment and apparatus used by 
the Fire Department, such as: puvrpsrs,, hose wagons, triple 
combination units, tractors and aerial ladder tracks, in- 
cluding related mechanical pad component parts. 

The staff consists of 1 foreman auto machinist, 8 auto 
machinists and 2 garagemen, including 1 auto machinist as- 
signed to field maintenance and minor repairs to all auto- 
motive units of the Fire Department . 

The general work order and timekeeping procedure is 
similar to that followed in the Automobile sad Truck Shops 
excepting that the individual Jots are much larger and re- 
quire much longer to complete. 






The individual jobs are initiated by a Fire Department 
officer in aubniitting a list of things to be done at the time 
the unit is brought into the shop for attention, and may 
consist of complete engine overhaul, converting water tank 
wagons to triple combination rigs, adding or modifying the 
design of old apparatus, installing additional or modern 
components, and even modifying newly delivered units to meet 
needs which are necessary or believed to be desirable,. 

Separate space, designated as the Aerial Shop, is 
operated in conjunction with the Fire Shop, principally to 
accommodate the larger and longer "tractor»ladder truck" 
combinations} the jobs including repairs to the mechanical 
features as well as modifications of the aerial ladder truck 
body aad components » 

lo Regardless of the scope, importance, and difficulty of the 
work in this shop and the number of work orders underway 
at any given time, only 1 or 2 mechanics are assigned to 
each Job, making the relative progress slow and delaying 
completion accordingly » 

This leaves the impression of too many units being worked 
on at one time, thus causing more apparatus to be kept out 
of service or for longer periods than necessary o 

An example was that h large aerial ladder trucks were in 
the shop at the same time* One of them was a newly de- 
livered unit which had never been in service; the others, 
a wreck, a major engine repair, and a conversion to 
modernize an old unit. 

2 In addition to heavy mechanical work, the conversion and 
modification of such large apparatus usually requires 
large amounts of body t/ork, followed by high-class paint 

jObSo 

3„ A total of 5 mechanics were working on the U aerial ladder 
trucks, and it was stated that it would probably require 3 
or k months for this work to be completed o 

ko The Fire Shop also has access to the Machine Shop and 

Blacksmith Shop facilities, so the immediate and available 
machinery, power equipment, and tools appear adequate. 

5» As previously noted in the Truck Shop, hydraulic lifts are 
too light and cannot be usedo The pit 3 provided are 
seldom used because the fire apparatus chassis are normal- 
ly high enough above the floor to provide ample room for 
working underneatho 



k6 






Do Ladder Shop 

This Shop is maintained in conjunction with the Fire Shop 
and is staffed hy 2 patternmakers who are engaged in the 
maintenance and repair of wooden iadfiersj also making patterns 
for various metal items, fittings and parts as may be required <> 
A supply of ladder stock is kept in a shed at some distance 
removed from the shop,, 

1. At the time of visit* one patternmaker was engaged in the 
manufacture of a 35 ft* fire ladder, entirely by hand, the 
approximate cost being quoted at $10 per foot* It was 
stated that such ladders are far superior to those stocked 
or manufactured by suppliers* 

2. It would seem more practical to confine the operations to 
maintenance and repair, rather than to compete with out« 
side ladder manufacturers, by manual methods, especially 
in view of the considerable backlog of ladder repair work 
on hand. 

E. Hos e Sho p 

This shop repairs and services a wide variety of hose 
fittings, equipment^ and partsj also tests hose and inspects 
the manufacture of new hose to assure compliance with specifi- 
cations and purchasing requirements. One machinist is assigned 
to these varied and inspection details. 

1. Because there is no fire hydrant located on the shop 
premises, it is necessary to take the hose and fire 
apparatus to the nearest available street hydrant for 
equipment testingo 

Fo Upholstery Shop 

This is also an auxiliary service shop designed for 
upholsteriag all types of automotive equipment and furniture » 
Actually, most of the present efforts are confined to the 
making of salvage and cleanup covers* tarpaulins, straps, 
belts ^ and protective devices for Fire Department usege. Oce 
leatherworker is assigned to these duties => 

lo The work carried on is necessary in order to provide, 
maintain* and repair this auxiliary Fire Department e_ 
sent. 

Hotrever, under these circumstances , the intention to 
provide general upholstery service for all types of auto- 
motive vehicles and furniture cannot be carried out f 
necessitating many such jobs being sent out 



V? 






2o Present quarters and facilities ;srmit fas- 
better utilization for all types of upholstery, lea. 
working, and related activities o 



This shop was established to repair and rehabilitate 
damaged bodies of all types of automotive vehicles and equip© 
ment, as well as to repair radiators and fabricate various 
sheet metal items , as required o It is staffed by three fender 
and body workers » 

Actually, most of the work is now confined to elieet metal 
and body and fender work involved in the conversion and modi- 
fication of fire apparatus and heavy motorized equipment, 
allowing little time for general passenger car body and fender 
vorko 

lc As a result of the present situation, much of the general 
body and fender work is sent out to commercial shops , 
excluding only the small Jobs which can be handled in 
connection with the shop repairs o 

2. The space, equipment, and tools available for general body 
and fender repair purposes could accommodate more work and 
could be developed into e modern automobile body shop of 
maximum utilization and service o 

3° Present doors of this shop are too small to allow large 

trucks to enter o 



This shop is operated in conjunction with the Automobile^ 
Trusk, and Fire Shop3 for machining and manufacturing parts „ 
as needed, and for maintaining and repairing a wide variety of 
pumps, valves, compressors, etc., both in the shop, as well as 
in the field o It is staffed by 3 machinists who operate the 
various metal working machinery and power tools depending on 
the nature of the work required o 

The present space is not formally laid out, nor the 
machines permanently set up, because it is intended to move 
the Machine Shop activities to another location now being 
used for aerial ladder truck repairs, and move the Aerial Shop 
to the larger vacated ttechine Shopo 



U6 



RiRGi; 



lo Considering that only three machinists are regularly 

assigned to this shop, and that it is operated largely on 
a standby and as°needed basis to serve the three repair 
shops, the large number of metal working machines is 
believed to be excessive o At present there are 22 such 
machines, including six lathes of various sizes g the 
largest having a bed length of about 20 feet. Other 
multiple installations are two shapers, two drill presses* 
two hydraulic presses,, two power hack saws* and three 
emery wheels. Management advises that some of these units 
will be discarded when the new location is establishedo 

2. Separate observations on several different days indicated 
very little activity in this shop or in the operation of 
any of these machines. It was reported that the machinists 
perform other duties in the repair and conversion of 
various types of equipment . 

3. A room at one end of the shop, used for storing metal 
working tools,, dies, drills^ etc., and presumably Intended 
as a tool crib, is entirely open at one end allowing com* 
plete freedom and access,, and is devoid of any control. 

h a In view of the very limited usage observed, the very 

extensive Investment in facilities,, machines, power tools 
and appurtenances, it is believed to be entirely too 
extensive, and this entire operation might be reduced. 

X. Blacksmith Shop 

This shop occupies part of the same area as the Machine 
Shop. Its activities include the forging, forming, and temper- 
ing of metals, and the design and fabrication of parts, tools? 
dies, etc., as needed in the three shops. The staff consists 
of three blacksmiths and two blacksmith finishers . 

The space and equipment is not formally laid out, nor are 
the units permanently installed. However, it will not be moved 
to the Aerial Shop, but will remain in the present building. 

1. Considering the complement of blacksmiths and finishers 
assigned to this shop, it does not appear to be as over- 
equipped as the Machine Shop, but several separate obser- 
vations indicated little activity or demand. It is 
reported that one of these employees works as a welder, 
and he also installs as well as fabricates parts , etc. 

2. Its need on such a large scale is not evident, and the 
entire operation might be reduced. 



^9 






Jo Paint Shop 

The purpose of this shop Is to re finish all body and 
fender repairs, as well as repaint all types of automotive 
vehicles and equipment? also to refinish fire ladders , apply 
gold leaf designs, do lettering, striping, apply decals, 
refinish office furniture and fixtures o 

Three Car and Auto Painters are assigned to this vorko 
Because of the availability of a spray painting booth at the 
Public Works Yard, one of thrse painters was temporarily 
assigned there, engaged in repainting Public Works Department 
trucks and motorized equipment o 

lo Considerable time is devoted to i-efinishing Fire Department 
apparatus, especially those additions, modifications, and 
rehabilitation ^obs previously mentioned, leaving little 
time for general repainting of passenger care, trucks, and 
other mechanized mobile equipment units o 

2„ The extensive gold leaf and striping work done on fire 
apparatus is alow and costly, raising the question as to 
the advisability for this policy and practice to the 
extent noted o 

3o With reference to passenger cars, trucks, and other 

motorized equipment, a wide range of colors vas observed, 
necessitating the purchase and. stocking of many varies 
and colors of paint, suggesting greater consideration 
color standardization. 

h a Under the above conditions, a well-ordered painting program 
to serve all types of City-owner passenger ctrs and other 
motorized equipment cannot be carried out^ as a result of 
which, much work is being sent out to commercial shops, or 
not being performed o 

K« Battery Shop 

One Auto Machinist is assigned to this shop c He insp: 
and charges batteries, repairs electrical systems, overhauls 
carburetors, etCo He also repairs nagnetos^ generators, port— 
able lighting units, pumps f 2nd othcir similar mechanical and 
electrical units c A stock of various types of new batten. 
is maintained in the shop for issuance as worn out batter 
are removed 

lo Judged by the wide range of electrical work done, this is 
more appropriately an auto electrical repair shop sue" 
a necessary service in conjunction with the Central Shops 

2= Stocks of new batteries could preferably be under the 
control of the Storekeey 



50 






Lo Tire Shop 

Two Garagemcn are assigned to this shop, which is 
responsible for changing, repairing : , and mounting automobile 
and automotive equipment tires of various sizes, balancing 
wheels^ and providing emergency field tire service., A large 
stock of tire<=mounted spare wheels is maintained in an adjacent 
storage area* 

la This tire storage area was originally designed as a 

motorcycle repair snopj, which is now maintained at a sep~ 
arate location in the City<> 

2o Ownership and control of tires is now considered a separate 
departmental responsibility, rather than centralized in 
the Central Shops » 

Mo paadlae Sei*vlce Station 

One Garageman is assigned to this location, which 
consists of a gasoline service pump j; a hydraulic lift, and 
standard equipment and tools for servicing^ lubricating^ 
steam cleaning; and cashing carso 

lo Based on several separate days' observations, little 

activity was observed in rendering any of these services 

No Vehicle Barking and Storage Sheds 

At the rear of the property, and extending the full length 
of the main Central Shops building, this reinforced concrete 
"shed" was designed to be used to park vehicles and equipment 
awaiting repair or disposition., 

Actually, this excellent structure is being utilized 
primarily for the storage of old and obsolete machinery, 
equipment, tools, wrecked trucks and cars, and a wide assort- 
ment of junk and scrap materials. 

1. This newly-constructed facility is not being used to best 
advantage, and requires attention to improve the over-all 
housekeeping, as well as to dispose of all unwanted and 
unnecessary ltemso 

2o This space could then be used for the parking and 

servicing of automobiles ^ trucks, and other motorized 
equipment, and for storage of units awaiting to be 
repaired,, 



51 



HJKCHASIKO 



The presence of such large quantities of obsolete machines; 
equipment, and scrap materials seems to point a lack of 
attention and follov»up being given to their systematic 
disposal, which, together with the situation observed at 
other locations, would probably bulk into a sizeable and 
worthwhile operation., Some of these items are potentially 
valuable, and could be sorted and separately stored. 



52 



PURCHASING 



Sho ps at Other Locat ions Throughout the City 

Ao Southeast Sewage Treatment Plant Shop 

This shop is established in a sewage treatment plant 
building, immediately across the street from the Central Shopsg 
to perform machine shop work in connection vith the repair 
and maintenance of the machinery and related operating equips 
cento It is presently staffed vith two Machinists, one on a 
temporary basis . 

The shop is equipped with seven metal-working machines, 
including % One large lathe (about 20 ft. bed); one large, 
and two smaller drills; one hydraulic press; one power saw; 
and one power grinder. 

The work Involves machining pump shafts and sleeves, 
fabricating special parts, and general operating maintenance . 

lo In view of the proximity of the large and extensively 
equipped Machine Shop at the Central Shops across the 
street^ this entire facility might be dispensed with* 
This plant has a regular, full-time operating and mainte- 
nance crew on a three-shift basis o The Machinists 
participate in performing plant maintenance . 

2. Standard and replacement parts- most freojiently required 
on the basis of experience could be fabricated at the 
Main Shop and kept on hand for emergency use. 

P. Riclimond-Sunset Sewage Treatment Plant Shop 

This shop Is also maintained in connection with the 
repair and maintenance of regular Sewage Treatment Plant 
equipments One Machinist is assignad at this location., The 
major equipment consists of one large (12 ft. bed) lathe, one 
drill press, and one grinder. The nature of the work is 
similar to that at other sewage treatment plants. The 
Machinist participates in performing plant maintenance. 

1. Even though this shop is somewhat removed from the 
Central Shops, the probable average activity does not 
appear to warrant a separate machine shop at this plant. 

2. At the time of visit, it was explained that the Machinist 
was at the Control Shops using the equipment there. The 
lathe was not installed, being set aside and covered with 
canvas. 

3. This plant is staffed with Operating Engineers on all 
three shifts, consisting of one Chief Operating Engineer, 
six Operating Engineers, and five Junior Operating 
Engineers. 



53 



HJRCHASIEG 



h In viev of the above situation, it appears feasible either 
to discontinue the separate machine shop operatings at the 
location and utilize the facilitiee at the Central Shops, 
or continue the separate machine shop under the jurist 
diction of the Sevage Treatment Division of the Bureau of 
Sewer Repair and Sevage Treatment. 

Co Northpoint Sevage Treatment Plant Shop 

The arrangement and vork performed here is similar to 
that at the other tvo Sewage Treatment Plants above described » 
One Machinist is assigned to this shop? The equipment consists 
of one 78" lathe, one large, and one smaller drill press, and 
one power grinder. 

lo As at the other locations, the observed machining activity 
at the time of visit was negligible o 

2. As at the other plants, regular operating engineers are 
stationed here 

3. In view of the above situation, it appears feasible either 
to discontinue the separate machine shop operations at 
this location and utilize the facilities at the Central 
Shop3, or continue the separate machine shop under the 
Jurisdiction of the Sewage Treatment Division of the Bureau 
of Sewer Repair and Sewage Treatment. 

D. Golden Gate lark Shop 

This separate shop was established for the maintenance and 
repair of automobiles, trucks, and miscellaneous equipment, such 
as power mowers, compressors, etc*, used by the Park Departraent. 
It is staffed by a Foreman Auto Machinist who plans, supervises , 
and inspects the work of three Auto Machinists and one Garage- 
man . 

The shop is well equipped, principal items including j One 
(8 fto bed, 16" swing) lathe, one (k ffco bed lathe, 22" swing) f 
one hydraulic press, tvo power grinders, 2 truck lifts (2U,000 
lb. capacity), one automobile lift (16,000 lb. capacity), one 
A-frame hoist; also wheel-balancing and tire-changing equips 
mento A pit is also available, but seldom used. 

A total of approximately 270 units are maintained, 
repaired, and serviced at this location, including s 

66 passenger cars and trucks 

20 tractors, graders, etc. 

kf miscellaneous units (sprayers^ generators, etc.) 

63 hand mowers. 



5h 






Shop repairs to antes and trucks are reported to be a v 
71 per menthp an average of about 1»7 per man°day Mover 
repairs average about kk per months or about two Jobs per man™ 
day B 

lo The shop procedure here is similar to that followed at the 
Automobile and Truck Shop at the Central Shops, but the 
record keeping is less formalized o 

a. The Standard Work Order is not employed j merely a one- 
copy shop order is used instead, which is signed by 
the Foreman when the job is assigned to the Mechanic, 
but is not signed nor dated when the work is completed <> 

bo The Mechanic's time is not kept nor distributed to the 
separate Jobs* 

Co The Foreman keeps an improvised,, hand -ruled time 

record, which is transmitted to the Central Shops for 
payroll purposes o 

2„ The Foreman makes local petty purchases from his personal 
cash* there being no fund established for this purpose. 
The regular Delivery Order form is used (one copy only), 
which is given to the vendor© The Foreman keeps a "Journal" 
listing of all purchases^, and is reimbursed by the Stores- 
keeper at the Central Shops on the basis of the invoices 
covering the purchases o 

3° The Foreman keeps extra recap tires on hand These are 
not inventoried, but are charged out against the above- 
mentioned monthly allotment for the shop operation. 

k A record is kept of gasoline issued to the nearest gallon, 
posted on a daily form, but no use is made of this and no 
reconciliation is made with the actual quantities delivered 
to the two pumps} the bulk delivery tickets being merely 
signed and then transmitted to the Superintendent at the 
Central Shops o 

The Foreman is also responsible for gasoline tanks located 
at each of three other Park locations * A record of the 
Issues is made by the Park Foreman at each location during 
the month, and then merely transmitted to the lark General 
Foreman for filing o 

5o The Foreman participates in the shop operations to scans 
extent, mainly in fabricating and machining parts, 
especially for power mowers (including shafts, parts, 
rollers * etco), maintaining a small steel stock for this 
purpose o Mowers are of various makes and models o 



55 



Kraci; 



60 One Mechanic la assigned practically full time to the 

maintenance and repair of power and hand mowing equipment, 
leaving only two Mechanics for the maintenance and repair 
of automobiles, trucks, and other motorized equipment. 

7« In view of the small number of automotive units involved 
and the four employee© assigned,,, the need for a "foreman" 
position, rather than a "lead man," is questionable,, 

8o A passenger car was observed to bo in very evident need 
of upholstery repairs, but it was stated that such jobs 
are usually sent out to commercial shops rather than to 
the Upholstery Shop at the Central Shops o 

9o The transfer of all substantial repair jobs to the Central 
Shops would limit the work to that comparable with an 
ordinary commercial service station© 

E„ Police Garage 

This facility is located in tha basement of the present 
Hall of Justice buildings being operated under the super- 
vision of a sub»Foreman Auto Machinist, sided by two Auto 
Machinists and four Garagemen, engaged, mainly, in making 
minor repairs, tune-ups, and adjustments of approximately 185 
passenger cars| also, in rendering related services^ including 
tires, batteries, spark plugs, etc. 

The larger repair Jobs are sent to the Automobile Shop 
at the Central Shops with an "Automobile Repair Order" form 
indicating the work to be done» 

These facilities will be moved to the newly~ccmpleted 
Hall of Justice building and the Police Service Station being 
constructed about a block to the vest. 

lo The Foreman keeps a running record of cars repaired and 
of the services rendered^ but no time and cost records are 
kept by individual Jobs. The daily time of the crew is 
kept in a time book and phoned in to the Central Shops 
office. 

2. As at other locations, no preventive maintenance program 
is established. 

3„ No lift hoist or pit is provided. All lubrication work, 
oil changes, and washing jobs are sent out to cosssercial 
shops at yearly contract rates o 



56 



PURCHASING 



k a The Foreman maintans small stocks of charged "out parts and 
supplies,, and a number 05? new batteries o Replenishments 
or additional items are acquired by processing Standard 
Delivery Order forms through the Central Shops * 

5o Police officers service their own cars with gas, water, 
air, and windshield washing* Each officer posts the 
exact amount of gasoline received to a continuous receipt 
book system, serially numbered, and indicating "start" and 
"finish" pump meter readings,. Tickets are subsequently 
filed by car number . 

6„ Bulk gasoline deliveries are receipted and accounted for, 
and properly reconciled with the issuances and gauged 
quantities on hando 

7* The facilities, equipment, and personnel requirements will 
have to be reappraised in connection with the moving of 
the garage and services to the new Hall of Justice and the 
nearby Service Station* 

**<> Moto rcycle Garage 

This facility is located at the Southern Police Station 
and is attended by one Garageman A total of about 165 Police 
motorcycles and three-wheelers are garaged here and given mini» 
mum service, such as; Brake adjustments, tire changes, oil 
replenishment, battery work; and various repairs to sirens, 
lights, brake pedals, etc* A small, locked storeroom is main° 
tained for keeping small stocks of tires, tubes, flares, etc* 

1 The apparent minimal service rendered is due to the 

arrangement with the manufacturer's local area representa" 
tive who carries out a contractual service arrangement 
somewhat similar to a preventive maintenance program on a 
"flat rate" or "per .Job" basis for different kinds of work^ 
These contractual services include lubrication, washing 
and general servicing, and specific repair jobs* 

2 Officers gas their own vehicles and keep a detailed record 
similar to that in the Police Garage, as previously 
described* 

3 3 Gasoline deliveries are made usually without any Officer or 
other person being present? the procedure being for the 
driver to "stick" the tank, fill it, and then make out and 
leave the delivery ticket* 

U In view of the above repair and servicing arrangement, the 
Motorcycle Shop, designed in conjunction with Central 
has never been utilized for this purpose • 



5? 



FURCB 



5„ The possibility of making all such repairs at the Central 
Shops in lieu of the present "manufacturer's monopoly" 
contract , might be fully explored 

6c The present facility for parking and servicing motorcycles 
and three-wheelers is very inadequate, being long out- 
moded; and, in fact, never intended for this purpose 
originally* Its removal to the new Hall of Justice 
building and nearby Police Service Station will be made 
upon completion of these facilities o 

Go Department of Public Works Army Street Gas Station 

This facility is located at 2323 Army Street, and is used 
primarily for servicing and minor repairs of department autc-= 
mobiles, trucks, heavy motorized equipment, and various 
auxiliary equipment units and accessories, including recharging 
of batteries and electric lanterns » 

The mechanical inspection, servicing, and repair work is 
done by one Auto Machinist^ and the gas station work, by three 
Garagemen, two on a night shift, and one during the day* 

lo There is no formalized preventive maintenance schedule in 
effect, although the Auto Machinist endeavors to establish 
some rotation for inspecting and servicing the individual 
units, 

2o The usual types of such service are limited to motor tune=» 
ups, and to motor repairs, adjustments, etc*, to various 
small electric- and gasoline-powered auxiliary units o 

3» Most of the servicing is done during the night shift, when 
the two men on duty attend 3ome 80 to 90 units j the usual 
practice being to drive each truck from the parking ehed 
to the "gas station" for replenishing gasoline, oil and 
water, and lubrication, as necessary o Service rendered 
is recorded on tickets for each unit, and a consolidated 
daily statement of gas and oil issued is prepared and the 
total gasoline reconciled with the meter reading on the 
pump, but not with the gauged amount remaining on hand in 
the tanko 

b„ Passenger cars and light trucks are lubricated on a rather 
informal and unscheduled basis, usually the bulk of this 
work being done on Saturday mornings on overtime « 



58 



FURCU 



5o If a formalized preventive maintenance program were 

organized and carried out at the Central Shops, it would 
be necessary merely to operate this facility similar to a 
commercial service station, providing for one "gas station 
attendant" during the day, and one at night The night 
attendant could be provided with a gasoline cart for 
servicing trucks and other motorized equipment in their 
respective stalls » 

H Department of Public Works 19th Avenue Garage 

This is a District Office and Yard for the parking and 
minor servicing of about 20 trucks and heavy motorized equip- 
ment units It is attended by one Garageman who dispenses 
gasoline, oil, and water, and lubricates the units at intervals* 
He parks the units at night in the sheds, and readies them for 
morning use<, 

The following types of equipment are based at this 
locations 

2 Catch Basin Riuctors (two motors on each) 
5 Mechanical Street Sweepers 
11 Trucks o 

1„ The attendant carries out an informal servicing schedule 
and notifies the respective drivers on a periodic mileage 
basis as to the date on which the unit is to report for 
servicingo He also assists the street sweeper operator in 
making broom changes, and maintains the Yard and Office in 
clean and orderly appearance <. 

2 Records of daily issuances of gas and oil s and receipts' for 
bulk deliveries are maintained, and totals reconciled with 
balances on hand* Monthly recapitulations are transmitted 
to the Central Shop Office. 

3» The relatively small number of units based at this 

location raise® the question as to whether this facility 
might be closed entirely and the property disposed of j 
transferring the equipment, etc, to the Golden Gate Park 
Shop<> At that location, "gas station" servicing could be 
provided, and preventive maintenance and repair work could 
be performed at the Central Shops 

lo Department of El ectricity Garage 

This is the Headquarters Office and Yard of the Departs 
ment„ One Garageman is assigned to the servicing of about 26 
automotive units, parking the vehicles at night, and readying 
them for morning use The facility has no grease rack, pit, 
or hydraulic lifto Gas, oil, and water service is available, 
and cars are greased from underneath., 



59 



HJRCH, 



1. Due to lack of sufficient workload and ample equipment , 
only minimum "car-side" service is available at this 
location? suggesting the possibility of having all normal 
servicing done at the nearest available location, as for 
example, the new Hall of Justice Service Station<> 

2. If and when the proposed new Department of Electricity 
headquarters building is constructed, consideration could 
be given to having all the motorized equipment routine 
servicing and preventive maintenance done at the then 
nearest, properly equipped location designed for that 
purpose. 

3c The Garageman also operates as a Yardman and makes 
deliveries, when required, to crews working at various 
field locations o 

J» 15th and Harriso n Streets Gas Station 

This facility is located across the street from the 
Central Warehouse., Its present purpose is to render "gas 
station" service to the Board of Education automobiles on a 
part-time basis. One Garageman is on duty for two hours on 
each of two days per week -fee dispense gasoline and oil. 

lo Considering the investment in property and equipment at 
this location, the facility could be dispensed with 
entirely and the services rendered at some other location, 
as for example, the new Ea.ll of Justice Service Station. 
It is reported that such disposition is currently being 
planned. 

K. Health Department Garage 

This facility is established in the basement of the 
Health Department Building,, and is used for parking Department 
passenger cars and Emergency Hospital ambulances. One Garage-* 
man is in attendance, dispensing gasoline, oil, and water to 
approximately 3^ units He also washes and lubricates the 
cars as necessary. A gasoline pump is maintained on the street 
level adjacent to the garage entrance. 

I. The apparent workload and activity does not appear to 
warrant the full time of one attendant. 

2<> The gasoline pump at the street level is under the 

jurisdiction of the Health Department. It was noted to be 
unlocked and unattended at times, and accessible from the 
street and sidewalk. 



60 






3<> Arrangements could be made to service the units at the new 
Hall of Justice Service Station,, 

h„ It the above were done, Garageman position could be 
abolished. 

Management and Accounting 

The Office of the General Superintendent of Shops is located at 
the Central Shops Ysrdo He is responsible for all activities relating 
to the maintenances repair, and overhaul of all types of automobiles, 
trucks, motorized heavy equipment, and auxiliary mechanical units at 
the various City plants, facilities, and installations, with the excep- 
tion of those units repaired at the Water Department Yard and the Muni° 
Cipal Railway 2hth and Utah Shops o 

lo The present efforts appear to be directed principal JLy at 

processing the time and material documents concerned with the 
Central Shops and shops at other locations in order to reflect 
proper encumbrances and expenditure records necessary for 
budgetary control purposes, not only for the shop operations 
alone, but in connection with individual departmental alloca- 
tions for their respective vehicle and equipment repair and 
maintenance purposes 

2„ Some consideration has been given to establishing a City-wide 
program and procedure to cover the operation, servicing, 
repair, and maintenance of all types of automobiles g trucks s 
heavy motorized equipment units, etc, under a unified, 
centralized organization^, administration, and controlo 

3o It is not unusual for large public jurisdictions to have b 
centralized equipment authority, at least to a substantial 
degree, embodying such activities ass 

a» Central "ownership" of all units under which monthly or 
annual, charges are made for the use of the vehicles a 
equipment to the departments to which they are assigned „ 
Such charges include depreciation, maintenance^ tires, 
etc<> 

b Central shops for their servicing, maintenance, and 
repair o 

Co A well~organized and administered preventive maintenance 
program covering all classes and types of vehicles and 
equipment o 

do A policy and practice of soaking all types of repairs, 

overhauls, and maintenance to the fullest extent possible, 
leaving an absolute minimum of work to be "seat out»" 



61 






e The establishment of a complete accounting system and 
procedures for accurately determining all labor, mater 
and overhead expenses on a per~vehicle and fleet basis to 
furnish accurate billing to the benefiting departments, 

f . The preparation of uniform monthly reports for the 

information and guidance of management and others concerned 
to establish criteria for interpreting relative costs, 
operating performance, and replacement policies » 

At the time of visits it was pointed out that considerable 
progress vas being made in the adoption of improved forms v 
procedures, and records pointing in the general direction of 
of the foregoing comments, apparently in conformity with a 
recently completed survey and report by an outside consultant.. 

While this is a distinct improvement, it is felt that it3 
scope is limited to the present somewhat restricted responsi- 
bility lodged in the Purchasing Department, through charter 
and other local legal and administrative provisions,; rather 
than embracing an over=all independent agency to include every 
phase of these important and costly aspects of City=>County 
administration., 

Until accurate unit costs are available, it will be difficult 
to establish satisfactory criteria for Judging the merits of 
the many separate facilities and operations now carried on„ 



62 



HJRCFL 



Water De partment Automotive Shop 

This shop is located at the Water Department Bryant Street Yard in 
an old, dilapidated, wooden shed -type building* The scope of its 
activities incJ.udes the servicing, maintenance, repair, overhaul, body 
and fender work,, and repainting of all automobiles, trucks, motorized 
equipment units , and auxiliary equipment operated throughout the Depart- 
ment (excepting Hetch Hetchy)o 

The approximate number of the various types of equipment are 
indicated below s 

Passenger 6edan8«*oec*ooo»»oo**ooooo 48 
Passenger coupesoon.o.o .0^**000*0000 19 

PiCkUp trUCkfloo <>aasoes*aaao sooooooo 32 

Station wagons •***oooo.oooo*oco»oooo 7 
Service and Utility trucksooocoo.ooo 11 

FlatoBed tlTJCkSoo 0000000*0*900000000 7 

Dump truckso o 00 o 000 00*00000000 o 0000 o 42 
Miscellaneous motorized equipment* o 24 

lOCal OOOOOOOOOOG*0000*0000»0*00 X*7W 

This fleet of automotive units and auxiliary equipment is deployed 
over a large area, including both the entire City and County and the 
adjoining Peninsula and Alameda Districts* With the exception of soae 
minor repairs at one of these outlying locations, all work is handled 
at the Bryant Street Shop* The staff consists of one Automotive Ma- 
chinist acting as a working Foreman, three Automotive Machinists, one 
Body and Fender Man, and two Garagemen* A Laborer is used on a part- 
time, as -needed basis to assist the Gsragemano 

The shop is equipped with three twin-post hydraulic lifts of 
18, COO lbo capacity o Heavy machine work, when needed, is done at the 
regular Machine Shop nearby* 

It is the established policy of the shop to do all types of main- 
tenance and repair work of whatever scope may be necessary, including 
complete engine overhauls o 

A separate Body and Paint Shop is utilised for doing all necessary 
body and fender repair work and the repainting of all automobile and 
equipment units* 

1., The Superintendent maintains an improvised preventive 

maintenance chart listing all units to be serviced over a 
six-months' period* "Service tags" are provided for use of 
the Garageman in recording the date, car number, speedometer 
reading, and type of service rendered* This information is 
later posted to the control chart* 



63 



PURCHASING 



2o If the Garagenjaa notes any defects in the course of his 

servicing, he prepares a "Machine Shop Repair Order" for the 
attention of the Shop Foreman* The Foreman makes a further 
detailed mechanical inspection and supplements the order with 
instructions as to the repair work required^and the unit is 
taken out of service » The completed repair orders, as well 
as the service tags, are filed hy vehicle number for future 
reference o 

3o Heavy duty motorized equipment units (other than trucks) are 
greased by their respective operator's each time they are taken 
from the Yarde 

k» Gasoline and oil are dispensed to the units parked in the Xard 
overnight hy a Garageman who comes on duty at 5 a»m D and uses 
tank carts for supplying the gas, diesel fuel, and oilc By 
8 a<>m<. the fleet is ready to move Other units not regularly 
stored at the Yard are serviced from the regular tank as they 
drive in each morning, and by 9*30 a<,m all cars have been 
serviced. 

5o The Garageman keeps a record of the quantities issued to each 
vehicle, and submits a daily sheet to the Storekeeper for 
cheeking and transmittal to the Yard Office Clerk for postingo 
A monthly report is prepared showing, by car number and opera- 
tor, the mileage traveled, the gallons of gasoline received., 
quarts of oil used, and the average number of miles per gallon., 

6. The fact that ma^jor repairs, overhauls^, and body and fender 
work, as well as repainting, are all done by this relatively 
small shop, indicates the possibility and opportunity for 
adopting a similar policy and procedure at the Central Shops, 
which were presumably designed and constructed for this 
purpose and have potential capability to serve on a much more 
extensive scale o 



6k 



RJRCfc. 



Municipal Railw a y Automotive Shop 

This chop is operated a3 an adjunct to the larger dle3el bu3 
repair and maintenance garage at 24th and Utah Streets . Its purpose 
is to service passenger care, trucks, and heavy duty notorized equip» 
ment units not normally considered part of the transit fleet » 

The approximate total number of vehicles and related equipment 
consists of. 

Passenger cars. ........ 31 

Trucks o.oo. $k 

Miscellaneous and Auxiliary Units... .27 

XOtSX. 0.O0O0..O..9. .009.00.0... oXjuC 

In addition to the above, this shop is responsible for the 
maintenance and repair of automotive equipment operated by several 
other agencies under the jurisdiction of the Public Utilities Com- 
mission, as indicated below. 

Hetch Hetchy Project..*.............. 9 

Airport Department.. O..O.O....D..OC. Ik 

Bureaus of Light, Heat and Power..... 3 

Public Utilities Commissi on. ......... 1 

xOT&JL •oo*oo»acft«o*0o«e*ocooooo«c C[ 

The staff consists of one Automotive Machinist Foreman, two 
Automotive Machinists, and five Garagemen who are engaged in rendering 
various types of services, repairs, and maintenance^ excepting complete 
engine overhauls, which are handled in the general Machine Shop located 
adjacent to this facility. 

Two heavy-duty twin^post hydraulic lifts are installed in the shop 
area for handling all maintenance and repair jobs a 

The gasoline and oil servicing operations are considerably sep~ 
arated from the shop. They are adjacent to a yard area where the 
trucks and equipment are normally stored when not in use. 

Trucks based at the Yard are regularly serviced by the Garagemen 
during the two aight shifts, on each of which two men are on duty. Each 
unit is driven to the shop, if lubrication or oil change is required, or 
to the fuel pumps for replenishment of gasoline,, oil, and water, and 
then returned to their respective parking locations . Diesel fuel is 
dispensed to some buses based at this Yard. 

All repairs are posted to a file of individual vehicle cards to 
accumulate an historical record of work done for future reference by 
the Foreman in conjunction with subsequent repairs. The shop work is 
also recapitulated at year«=end for inclusion in the annual report of 
the Superintendent of Automotive Equipment (Municipal Railway;. 



65 






A small stock of parts, accessories^ hand tools* ete , is kept 
controlled by the Shop Foreman 5 having been "charged out" to him fi 
the etoreroomo A small supply of various size tires is also in the 
custody of the Foreman o 

During the time of visit, a backlog of six repair jobs was on hando 

I. The present arrangement of utilizing a part of the transit bus 
garage for this shop is a makeshift arrangement, and its 
physical separation from the truck parking area and servicing 
facilities is awkward <, 

2o nevertheless 9 this improvised shop appears to be following a 
partial preventive maintenance and general repair program » 
Considering the small number of Mechanics on duty, a "Foreman" 
status supervisor would not normally be required^ especially 
since four of the five Garagemen are on night shift 

3o Under the circumstances^ consideration might be given to 
consolidation of these activities with those at the Central 
Shops o 

k The practice of driving each unit from its parking location to 
be serviced could be dispensed with in favor of using tank 
carts for re-fueling purposes, thus eliminating the need for 
two Garagemen on each of the night shifts « 

5o Records of gasoline and oil issuances are good, and the 

reconciliation with quantities on hand, and accountability for, 
and distribution of, time and materials used against the indivi° 
dual units appears satlsfactoryo 

Recommendations 



General 



The many separate garagesj, repair shops? and service stations 
be reduced to a minimum and the operations consolidated at the 
Central Shops to' the fullest extent possible , in order to 
comprise a Central Motorized Equipment Department under the 
unified supervision of a technically- and professionally^ 
trained and experienced Mechanical Engineer <> 

In view of the excellent newly-constructed Central Shops 
Building, every effort be made to expand the existing facili- 
ties and service to include all City Departments, at least for 
all substantial repair work* providing for only "gas station" 
type facilities and minor repairs at selected geographical 
locations o 



66 






A° Automobile Shop 

* 1» All Clty"Owned passenger vehicles and light trucks be 

repaired at this shop in order to utilize its capabilities « 

2o With the present availability of a large Machine Shop 
adjacent to this work area, heavier and more complete 
repair work be undertaken^ including engine overhauls, 
with few, if anjS) exceptions, as is now being done at the 
Bryant Street Shop of the Water Department „ 

* 3« A formalized preventive maintenance program be established 

providing for the regular periodic checking, inspecting, 
servicing, and minor adjustment and repair of each auto« 
motive and motorized equipment unito 

* ko A policy of greater standardization and uniformity of 

types of vehicles and equipment be adopted to facilitate 
stocking of essential parts and accessories, and maid] 
actual repairs o 

5° Vehicles awaiting attention be stored in other areas in 
order to permit full utilization of the shop area for 
preventive maintenance and repair operations o 

60 A parts cleaning equipment unit be provided to obviate 

the necessity for manual cleaning and -washing of individual 
pieces or the time involved in taking such parts to an 
available cleaner in one of the other shops o 

7. Testing and analyzing equipment be provided as an 

essential requirement of a preventive maintenance and 
repair program. 

* 8. Substantial repair Jobs on automobiles and light tr 

now being performed at the following locations be 
assigned for attention at the Central Shops? 

a Q Golden Gate Park Shop 

b» Water Department Automotive Shop 

c« Municipal Railway, 2irth and Utah Street Shop 

do Police Garage 

e« Public Works Department 



* Charter change may be necessary <, 



67 



HJRCH 



Bo Truck Shop 

* lo All City»oxmed heavy trucks and motorized equipment 

(excepting transit buses and trolley coaches) he repaired 
at this shop in order to utilize its capabilities o 

2<> With the present availability of a large, well-equipped 
Machine Shop adjacent to this work area, more complete 
repair work be undertaken, including engine overhauls, 
with few, if any, exceptions, as is now being done at the 
Bryant Street Shop of the Water Department,, 

* 3o A formalized preventive maintenance program be established 

providing for the regular periodic checking, inspecting, 
servicing, and minor adjustments and repairs of each 
motorized unit. 

* k A policy of greater standardization and uniformity of 

types of trucks and motorized heavy equipment be adopted 
to facilitate stocking of essential parts and accessories 
and making actual repairs. 

5» The existing non°usable light hydraulic lift3 be replaced 
with heavy hydraulic lifts to permit ready aecessibility 
for repair purposes and/or removal of heavy parts . Con- 
slderation be given to transferring existing heavy 
hydraulic lifts from shops to be discontinued o 

6. Heavier capacity chain block hoists be provided to peiT.it 
handling heavier loads, such as in raising front ends r 
removing engines, etc. 

7. Detail mechanical drawings, descriptions and specifications 
for all heavy motor vehicles and other motorized equipment 
units be given meticulous attention and consideration by 
Mechanical Engineers, Shop Foremen, and Shop Superintend- 
ents in order to assure acquiring the most suitable 
machines for the City's specific needs. 

80 The policy and practice of frequently modifying and over~ 
hauling manufacturers* standard equipment, often im- 
mediately upon delivery, be reduced. 

9. Vehicles awaiting attention be stored in other areas in 
order to permit full utilization of the shop area for 
preventive maintenance and repair operations. 



* Charter change may be necessary. 



HJRCii 



* 10o Substantial repair Jobs on trucks and other motorized" 
equipment now being performed at the following locat" 
be assigned for attention at the Central Shops s 

a, Golden Gate Park Shop 

bo Water Department Automotive Shop 

Co Municipal Railway, 24th and Utah Street Shop 

d. Public Works Department 

Co Fire Shop and Aerial Shop 

lo Jobs at these shops be scheduled, worked on, and 

completed with greater dispatch in order to minimize the 
number of units and length of time they are kept out of 
service, especially important apparatus, such as large 
aerial ladder trucks o 

2 To the fullest extent possible, quotations be solicited 
for all extras and modifications, when specifications are 
prepared and bids requested, in order to compare such 
quotations with the cost of performing such work at this 
shop. 



D» Ladder Shop 



The major efforts of this shop be devoted to repairing 
out-of-serviee ladders, and all new ladders be purchased 
from manufacturers » 



So Hose Shop 



A fire hydrant be installed in close proximity to the 
shop to permit testing of hose and fire apparatus o 



The scope of services performed by the present employees 
be expended to serve as a central location for all 
of upholstery work necessary on passenger automobiles > 
trucks, heavy motorized equipment, as well as for office 
furniture, etc , and the practice of sending out work of 
this nature be reduced to the minimum.. 



* Charter change may be necessary 



69 



RJRGHASiaS 



Go Body Shop 



The scope of services at this shop be expanded to serve as 
a central location for all types of body and fender work,, 
except major frame alignings required on passenger cars, 
trucks, fire apparatus, and other heavy motorized equip-* 
ment units for all departments o Work of this nature 
presently sent out be discontinued, or at least reduced to 
a mlnimumo 



H, Machine Shop 



In connection with the recommended centralization of all 
automotive and other mechanical equipment maintenance and 
repair at the Central Shops, the Machine Shop needs and 
requirements be reviewed by a professional Mechanical 
Engineer or expert Machine Shop Superintendent to determine 
the minimum number, types, and sizes of metal working 
machinery required; design the most efficient layout and 
arrangement of these units, and determine the minimum 
staffing requirements. 



lo Blacksmi th Shop 

lo In connection with the recommended centralization of all 
automotive equipment maintenance and repair at the Central 
Shops, the Blacksmith Shop needs and requirements be 
reviewed concurrently with the Machine Shop and redesigned 
and systematically laid out with the minimum required 
units of equipment, tools, and personnel* 

Jo feint Shop 

* 1 In connection with the recommended centralization of all 
automotive and equipment maintenance and repair at the 
Central Shops, the Paint Shop needs and requirements, 
including drying equipment, be reviewed based on the 
recommendation that all possible passenger cars, trucks, 
heavy motorized equipment, fire apparatus, auxiliary 
mobile equipment, etc, be repainted here 

2 Consideration be given to eliminating excessive striping, 
lettering, and gold leaf embossing on fire apparatus in an 
effort to reduce the time and cost required to refinish 
these unitso 



* Charter change may be necessary., 



70 



PURCHASING 



3o Colors of automotive equipment be standardized and made 
uniform to the extent possible in order to minimize the 
vide variety of expensive paints carried on hand and 
reduce the time and cost in changing from color to color. 

4<, Adequate ventilating and rapid drying equipment he 
provided in this shop* 

5o The separate spray booth at the Public Works Department 
Tard be operated in conjunction with the Paint Shop at the 
Central Shops, as though it were physically located there, 
in order to utilize the facilities at both locations to 
the fullest extent possible o 



K» Batteiy Shop 



In conjunction with the previously recommended expansion 
of shop facilities, consideration be given to developing 
the present Battery Shop to function as a central anto» 
motive electrical repair shop, coordinated with the 
several adjacent Autoasotive Shops 8 in order to specialize 
in rendering complete service to all automotive electrical 
systems o 



* 1 Ownership, storage, and control of tires and tire-mounted 
wheels be vested in the Central Shops rather than In 
separate departments » The cost of tires be included in 
the charges made to the departments for use of the 
vehicles* 

Mo Gasolin e Service Station 

1» The services available at this location be more fully 
utilized in conjunction with the recommended increase in 
the Central Shops* operations, and the establishment of a 
detailed preventive maintenance program,, 

2 The maintenance of records of issuances of gasoline and 
oil to individual cars be strictly in accord with the 
uniform procedures, forma, and reports to be developed for 
the central controlling and accounting for these services, 
including receipt of bulk gasoline and oil deliveries and 
periodic reconciliation with balances on hand. 



Charter change may be necessaryo 



71 



PURCHASING 



No Vehicle Parking and S torage Sheds 

1. In connection with expansion of the Central Shops' 

activities^ these permanently constructed sheds be thor« 
oughly cleaned out by removing and disposing of all w 
obsolete used machinery ^ equipment s and Junkj, and the 
spaces used for temporary storage of vehicles awaiting 
repair and for auxiliary Repair Shop purposes o 

2 « Usable parts and accessories stripped from wrecked and 
salvaged equipment be placed In tha storeroom.. 



72 






S hops at Other Locations Thr oughout the Clty 

A, B P C Three Sewage j freatinent Plant Machine Shops 

lo In view of the fact that the Machinists at these three 
locations engage in general Sewage Treatment Plant repair 
and maintenance, these activities be assigned to the 
Jurisdiction of the Sewage Treatment Division of the 
Bureau of Sewer Repair and Sewage Treatments 

This recommendation is in agreement with the recom- 
mendations of the Task Force covering this Bureau regarding 
the Reorganization of Divisions of the Sewage Pumping and 
Sewage Treatment Divisions <, 

Do G olden Gat e Park Shop 

* 1. Substantial repair jobs be performed at the Automobile and 
Truck Shops at the Central. Shops , and this local shop be 
discontinued, excepting for minor adjustments and repairs 
and normal gas station services requiring one Garageaan» 
In addition.* the maintenance, repair, and servicing of 
lawn mowers be retained at this location requiring one 
Auto Machinist o 

2o The maintenance of records of issuances of gasoline and 
oil to individual cars be strictly in accord with the 
uniform procedures, forms, and reports, as previously 
recommended under M., Gasoline Service Station, 

E, Police Garage 

« 1, With the completion of the new Hall of Justice Police 

Garage and nearby Service Station, the latter facilities 
be limited to regular "gas station" services and minor 
adjustments and repairs, and all substantial repairs be 
done at the Central Shops* 

2o Personal servicing of their assigned cars by Police 
Officers be discontinued,, 

3o The maintenance of records of issuances of gasoline and 
oil to individual cars be strictly in accord with the 
uniform procedures, form3j, and reports, as previously 
recommended under Mo Gasoline Service Static-no 



* Charter changes may be necessary o 



73 



RJRCI 



k* Personnel requirements at this location be limited to only 
such Mechanics and Garage Attendants necessary to carry 
out the servicing and minor repair work mentioned above. 

* 5. Additional units from other departments be served at this 
location^ and the charges recorded and processed through 
the centralized clerical and accounting system for reim- 
bursements by the using departments, 

F. Motorcycle Garage 

1. The apparent monopolistic practices of requiring all 
motorcycle repairs to be done by a specific outside vendor 
be discontinued, and in lieu thereof, a preventive main- 
tenance program be developed to be done by City personnel . 
Substantial maintenance and repair work be dose at the 
Central Shops in the building originally intended as a 
Motorcycle Shop but now being used for tire storage o 

2. The parking and storage of motorcycles at the Southern 
Police Station be discontinued, and they be based at the 
new Hall of Justice Garage* Regular "gas station service" 
be provided at the nearby Police Service Station. (This 
transfer has been authorised.) 

3o Servicing gasoline and oil to their own motorcycles by 
Police Officers be discontinued . 

ko The maintenance of records of issuances of gasoline and 
oil to individual motorcycles te strictly in accord with 
the uniform procedures, forms, and reports, aa previously 
recommended under M. Gasoline Service Station^ 

G D epartment of Public Works Army St r e et Gas Station 

» 1. The use of this location for making minor repairs and 

adjustments be continued <, This work be performed by the 
Auto Machinist on duty who will also provide normal gas 
station services. Concurrently,, the day shift Garageman 
position be eliminated. 

2 The daily replenishment of gasoliae^ oil^ and water to 
each individual unit based at the Public Works Yard be 
continued^ but a suitable mobile tank cart be provided 
for this purpose to obviate the necessity to drive each 
unit between the parked location and the service pumps. 

3. With the use of such a mobile tank cart, one of the two 
Garageman positions on the night shift be eliminated. 

* Charter changes may be necessary. 



7* 






ko The maintenance of records of issuances of gasoline and 
oil to Individual units, both during the day and night 
shifts, be strictly in accord with the uniform procedures, 
forms, and reports, as previously recommended under 
Mo Gasoline Service Station. 

Ho 19th Avenue Garage^ Department of Public Works 

1. The informal preventive maintenance program developed by 
the Garageman at this location be discontinued, and all 
equipment units be transferred to the Golden Gate Park 
Garage o 

2. The position of Garageman at this location be discontinued , 

** fepart ment of Electricity Garag e 

1. All automotive servicing at this location be discontinued, 
and all regular "gas station" services be performed at 
the new Service Station located near the new Eall of 
Justice o 

2« All preventive maintenance be performed at the Central 
Shops in accord with the over-all preventive maintenance 
progranio 

3o The position of Garageman at this location be eliminated 
and his other duties assigned to other Department of 
Electricity personnel. 

**° 15th and Har rison Streets Gas Station 

lo The intermittent use of this facility for a very limited 
purpose be discontinued. 

2« The Board of Education vehicles now receiving gasoline at 
this location be serviced from the new Police Service 
Station near the new Hall of Justice. 

K. Health Department Garage 

1. The use of this basement area for parking cars be 

continued, but all "gas station" servicing be eliminated 
and all cars and ambulances affected receive these 
services at the new Police Service Station located near 
the new Hall of Justice. 

2* The gasoline pump at the street level be eliminated,, 

3. The Garageman position be eliminated. 



75 



PURCHASING 



Management and Accounting 

1„ The emphasis being given to the detailed operations accessary 
to maintain budgetary encumbrance accounts for individual 
departments to reflect charges for labor, material, and 
incidental charges for automotive equipment,maintenance, 
repairs, and servicing* be discontinued. 

* 2. The fiscal and accounting systems, records, and procedures be 

reorganized to conform to the requirements of a centrally ad- 
ministered City*wide automotive maintenance system, 

» 3« This centralised equipment management, accounting, and control 
be predicated on the principles of s 

a n Centralized "ownership" and control of all automotive 
equipment o Rental charges be determined by type of 
vehicle to include all applicable costs except 
gasoline and oil replenishments o 

bo Establishment of a comprehensive preventive maintenance 

program u 

Co Expanding the scope of work of the separate shops at the 
central location to Include all types of maintenance, 
repair, overhaul, body work, and repainting,, 

do Establishing appropriate forms and procedures for 

recording, costing, and distributing all labor, mater* 
overhead, and operating costs oc a per vehicle basis., 

e, Preparation of monthly reports to indicate the monthly 
and year-to-date total and unit operating cost per mile 
per vehicle to provide comparative statistical information 
for management purposes and replacement policies » 

* ka Such centralized equipment "ownership" system be operated on 

a "revolving fund" basis with the initial working capital 
being advanced, as a loan from the General Fund, to cover an 
adequate period required to establish this operation., 

* 5o A Passenger Car Pool Service, to be operated on a revolving 

fund basis, be established as a subsidiary of the overfall 
program, and to provide for: 

a. Centralized custody of all passenger vehicles assigned 
to the pool. 



* Charter change may be necessary.. 



76 






b» Establishing schedules of fees for the use of such vehicles 
on a per mile and/or hourly basis, such fees to be suf- 
ficient to return all operating ^ depreciation, maintenance, 
repaid nd overhead costs o 

c» Costs covering usage of vehicles be charged to the 

respective departments on a monthly basis of accumulated 
trip tickets o 

do Supervision of the Car Pool to be the responsibility of a 
Dispatcher , together with Oarage Attendants*, as may be 
necessary o 

e, The Passenger Car Pool be located in the Civic Center 
area, with the possibility of establishing centrally 
located branches at one or two outlying locations, such as 
at the Golden Gate Bark Shop* 

f c A detailed survey be made of the required number of 
automobiles to be included in the Passenger Car Pool. 

* 6. Concurrently with the establishment of the Car Pool, 

passenger cars no longer be assigned to individual officials 
or employees on a regular full-time basis, excepting in those 
instances where the duties of the individuals are such as to 
require automotive transportation substantially throughout the 
day as an integral part of their regular duties. 

* 7« All cars personally assigned to individuals or dispatched on a 

trip basis be personally driven, and no "chauffeur driven" 
automobiles provided, excepting in cases where the individual 
may be physically incapacitated or otherwise prevented from 
personally driving a car. Exceptions to this recommendation 
be made in the instances of the Mayor, Board of Supervisors, 
and top Fire and Police Department officers. 

* 8. In view of the several separate locations to be maintained for 

dispensing gasoline and oil, all credit cards currently out= 
standing be recalled, and. thereafter only a very limited 
number authorized to be issued to specific individuals on the 
basis of demonstrated need and subject to audit and approval. 

* * 9. Complete control of gasoline and oil for automotive equipment 

be vested in the Central Motorized Equipment Department, and 
proper accounting procedures established to provide proper 
control. 

* 10. A comprehensive centralized preventive maintenance program be 

established for all automobiles^ trucks and other motorized 
equipment. This centralized program to be performed at the 
Central Shops because of the specialised testing and analytical 
equipment recommended for use at this location. 

'■• Charter change may be necessary. 



77 



PUT; 

Other Departmental Automotive S hops 
Water Department Automotive Shop 

* lo The use of theae separate facilities be discontinued, and 

substantial repairs of automotive equipment be transferred to 
the Central Shops » 

* 2o Only "gas station" service and minor repairs by the Garageman 

be retained at this Yard to serve the daily operating needs 
of the cars, trucks , and other motorized equipment based here« 

3« The maintenance of records of issuances of gasoline and oil 
to individual units be strictly in accord with the uniform 
procedures, forms, and reports, as previously recommended 
under M<> Gasoline Service Station, 

Municipal Railway Automotive Shop 

* lo The use of these' separate facilities be discontinued, and 

substantial repairs of automotive equipment (exclusive of 
transit vehicles) be transferred to the Central Shops » 

* 2, Only "gas station" services and minor repairs by the 

Garageman be retained at this location. 

In connection with the replenishment of gasoline and oil in 
the vehicles parked in the Yardj, use be made of a mobile tank 
car, thus obviating the necessity for driving each unit 
between its location in the Yard and the pumps o 

3° The positions of one Garageman on each night shift be 
eliminated* 

k a The maintenance of records of issuances of gasoline and oil 
to individual units be strictly in accord with the uniform 
procedures, forms, and reports, as previously recommended 
under ML Gasoline Service Station,, 

Pro posed Organization 

lo The present Bureau of Shops in the Purchasing Department and 
other seperate departmental automotive shops be reorganized 
as a central Motorized Equipment Department, substantially as 
indicated on Exhibit III. 



* Charter change may be necessaryo 



78 



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PURCMSIHG 

Vo BUREAU OF TABUIA!g£EG A5D REPROIXCTIOH 

Page 

Findings 80 

Reproduction Section 80 

A, Blueprinting 80 

B« Photostating 80 

Co Photography 81 

Do Offset Duplicating and Mimeographing 8l 

E. Section Supervisor and Clerical 82 

Fo O t her Potential Services 83 

a Clerical Typing and Stenographic Pool 83 

ho Messenger Service 83 

Co Mailing Service 6k 

d. Official Equipment Maintenance 8^ 

e« Telephone Service 8^ 

f o Information Service 8? 

go Records Retention and Disposal 85 

Central Tabulating Section 86 

Recommendations 88 

Exhibit I? - Chart of Proposed Central Services Department 

Exhibit Y » Chart of Proposed Central Data Processing 
Department 



79 



PURCHASB5G 
BUREAU OF TABULATE AUD REPRODUCTICB 



Findings 

Reproduction Section 

As presently established, this bureau may be considered the 
nucleus of a potential central services agency for the entire City- . 
County organization. It Is composed of a Reproduction Section and a 
Tabulating Section under the direction of a Supervisor of Tabulating 
and Reproduction. 

1. This otherwise satisfactory activity is not functioning to 
the extent normally considered feasible for a central services 
agency in a large governmental jurisdiction. 

2. A central services agency is not necessarily functionally 
associated with a central purchasing department and for 
greatest effectiveness it could be separately organized and 

administered « 

A. Blueprinting 

This unit is located in a separate room on the 5th floor 
of the City Ball, considerably removed from the bureau's 
office and supervisor in the basement. It is staffed by 3 
blueprinting machine operators and is equipped with 2 Ozalid 
machines, 1 Pease blueprinting machine and a paper cutter „ 

lo The blueprinting unit could be relocated in closer proxi° 
mity to the main office and supervisor of the Bureau . 

2o Considering the number of machines available, more work 
could be assured by this unit acting as part of an over- 
ell central services operation<> 

3* A scale of ncn- refundable charges for sets of construc- 
tion drawings issued to prospective bidders could be 
established to cover the entire printing and handling 
costs. 

B, Photostating 

This unit is located in the Reproduction Section main 
office and work space in the basement of the City Ball. It is 
staffed by 1 full time and 1 part-time photostat operator. 
The equipment consists of 1 photostat machine and dryer, 1 
vacuum frame, 1 print washer and 2 print dryers. In addition g 
2 microfilm cameras are employed for making film reeords as 
required. 



80 






lc In general this unit is performing a useful service in a 
satisfactory manner in a congested working area which is 
not separate from the other photographic and duplicating 
operations o 

2o More fully automatic equipment is available which requires 
less personal attention and manual operations „ 

C, Photography 

This unit is also located in the rain office area of the 
section and is staffed by 1 photographer full-time and 1 
photographer part-time, as needed. The activities are con- 
cerned chiefly with making photographs for the Public Works 
Department in connection with construction progress, for ' 
City Attorney regarding; damage claims^ accidents, etc, and 
pictures for the redevelopment and planning agencies,. Several 
types of cameras are available, together with the customary 
dark roams and laboratory facilities, including 3 enlarging 
cameras o 

Some photolithography work is done by the photographer 
in connection with maps, charts and various illustrations used 
in special reports, brochures and other reproductions 

1« The fact that the 3pace presently occupied has been 
edapted for the photography operation on a more or less 
improvised basis polnto to the opportunity for a better 
designed and laid out facility » 

2. Services performed by this unit could be expanded to cover 
all photography needs of City departments. 

Do Offset Duplicating end I&me&graphln g, 

This unit is located in the same general area with the 
photography and photostat operations in the main office of 
the reproduction section » It is staffed by 2 duplicating 
machine operators who operate 2 mimeograph machines and 1 
offset duplicating machine iu making multi-copies of vari' 
annual and special reports, ordinances, bids, specif icatir 
legal forms and documents « 

At the time of visit, it was observed that considerable 
emphasis was given to the use of aluminum offset plates, 
requiring higher first cost than ordinary paper rcasterso 



81 



. . . 



lo This appears to be a rather unsatisfactory arrangement 
for these services, leading an atmosphere of general con- 
fusion and appearance of poor housekeerl 
the overlapping of several adjacent working ara^So 

2o While rendering satisfactory services to a United extent, 
this service does not encompass the potential of an 
adequately designed and fully operated city-vide central 
duplicating end mimeographing operation.. Opportunities 
exist for extended uses of these facilities for printing 
of ordinary f ©rms, form letters* letterheads, reports, 
brochures, pamphlets, etco, for all departments » 

3o A duplicating offset machine in a nearby office was ob- 
served to be making satisfactory paper matR at far less 
material and labor costs than for aluminum plates 

E, Section Supervisor and Clerical 

The head of the Tabulating and Reproduction Bureau is 
also the direct supervisor in charge of the reproduction 
section, the separate units of which have been described in 
the foregoing paragraphs » 

Because there is a separate supervisor in charge of the 
Tabulating Section, most of the time of the Bureau head is 
devoted to the reproduction activities and his office is 
located in a corner of the space (Boom 30 City l&ll), accessi- 
ble both to the public space and counter as veil as to the 
work spaces end operations <> 

The supervisor is assisted by 1 Account tflerk in the 
processing of the service orders from various departments as 
well as in handling the general office vorko 

lo The present dual responsibility of the bureau head for 
both the reproduction and tabulating activities, while 
quite satisfactory on the limited scops of services 
being performed would not be proper if the fullest 
possibilities of a central services organization were 
ultimately realized ., 

So tbder such circumstances, the extension of all of the 
activities and services to all departments,, in the 
respective fields of reproduction end tabulating, would 
necessitate separate full-time supervisors « 



PUBCii 



Ofcher Potential Services 

Central service agencies normally include other activities 
in addition to those previously describedo A comprehensive 
survey of the needs of the various departments would indicate 
which of these could be efficiently and economically estab- 
lished and operated centrally <> 

a « Clerical, Typing and Ste n ographic Pool 

Variations in workloads, seasonal peeks, emergencies and 
special occasions occur throughout the city administration 
where the availability of trained end experienced employ- 
ees could be used to advantage on a part-time basis, as 
seededo This would frequently preclude the necessity for 
employing less experienced or less Qualified part<=time 
temporary help or paying premium rates for overtime to 
regular employees o 

A determination could be made of the equivalent number of 
full-time clerical, typing and stenographic positions 
which woild be required in a central pool in order to meet 
these variables and peak demands , with the provision that 
a larger number of positions would b^ eliminated at the 
departmental levels o 

bo Messenger Service 

Inter and iBtra-department messenger services are 
employed to some extent on an improvised basis to aceom~ 
modate specific needs „ However,, there is no organized 
and formalized city-wide program by which the numerous 
departments, agencies and operations can be expeditiously 
coordinated o This lack of efficient communcatian is 
frequently the cause of unnecessary delays in processing 
Important documents and receiving and delivering parcels, 
packages^ equipment, parts, etc where time elements are 
essential o 

A detailed study of the over-all problem would undoubt» 
edly disclose the need for and advantages to be derived 
from a centrally established and administered messenger 
service o This would embody not only inter-department 
but inter-building routes for which regular daily 
Itineraries and time tables would be established, 
preferably at not less than on a two=»trip per day basis „ 



83 



FURCJ, 



c. Hailing Service 

While it tfould obviously not be feasible or advisable to 
plan foy a single centralized mailing operation,, a de- 
tailed survey would disclose the opportunity for consoli- 
dating all nailing now separately handled at the Civic 
Center. The establishment of a city-wide messenger serv- 
ice, as above mentioned, would add other jurisdictions 
which could he incorporated in such a central sailing 
faculty. 

Provision for special mechanized mail handling equipment 
at the central location would contribute to the expediting 
of the entire mailing operation and eliminate much of the 
time consuming manual methods. 

do Office Equipment Maintenance 

Present equipment contracts with separate outside vendors s 
together with the detailed requisitioning and pure case 
order procedures, invoicing and paying operations suggest 
the advisability of studying the possibility of performing 
the maintenance and repair of office machines and equip- 
ment by city forces o Due to the many and ever increasing 
types, makes, and models of such mechanical and electrical 
office machines, it may be determined that such a change 
would not prove beneficial or economical . 

nevertheless, the problem and possibilities could be 
thoroughly explored to definitely establish the advantages 
and disadvantages of adopting such a plan as part of the 
Central Services Departcanto 

e. Telephone Service 

The detailed administration of telephone services by 
individual using agencies is sometimes abandoned in favor 
of consolidating all separate services under central 
management o The advantages are irany when considering 
the numerous separate installations, changes^ extensions^, 
removals, etc. normally required in meeting the many and 
varied office and operating needs. 

Also directly involved are the related requisitioning^ 
purchasing, invoicing and payment of the many separate 
departmental telephone services which otherwise could be 
centrally administered . 



8h 



PURCHASING 



A complete survey of the city-wide telephone installation 
to establish the need and use of each separate instrument 
could point to many instances for effecting savings, in- 
cluding opportunities for consolidation of branch switch- 
board facilities o Subsequently^, all telephone services 
could be made the responsibility of the Central Services 
Department * 

f o Information Service 

Operation of a satisfactory public Information service 
should be an important aspect of the city's public rela- 
tions program. Assigning it as a specific activity of 
the Central Services Department would appear to be a 
better arrangement than its present allocation as an 
adjunct of the city administrative officer e 

A more central and more conspicuous location of the main 
information booth now located In the City Hall lobby would 
make it more noticeable and serviceable to the general 
publico Its use could be improved and expanded according- 
go Records Retention and Disposal 

The problems, policies and procedures involved in record 
retention and disposal affect every department o While 
some attention is being given to this matter, its con- 
sideration on a city-wide basis could be undertaken with 
resulting improvements in the current and inactive filing 
and storage requirements and facilities » 

Directly associated, is the entire matter of administering 
an adequate forms" control program affecting all activi- 
ties In ell departments o 

She proper approach to both these problems would require 
complete cooperation of all operating agencies, at all 
levels, with the ultimate objective of establishing a 
central forms 8 control and records* retention program 
as pert of the Central. Services Department o 



35 



PHRCHASIRG 



Central Tabulating Section 

The tabulating section provides a centralized service 9v**i Table 
to all City and County departments,, It was established in 1937 for 
the purpose of accomplishing two objectives: 

lo To place electronic accounting machines and other equipment 
la a central location where use would be made available to 
all City departments* 

2. To eliminate unnecessary duplication of expensive equipment 
with its attendant cost of operation and maintenance 

This centralized tabulating installation consists of 25 pieces 
of equipment o The staff consists of 17 operators and a full-time 
supervisor of tabulating. 

The supervisor estimates that about 7&f> of the work is devoted to 
processing traffic tickets issued by the Police Department,, In addi- 
tion 3 many small jobs are done for various departments <, Time usage 
records by type of equipment are not maintained * 

la Despite this favorably reported central tabulating service, 
there are 12 other Installations in departments throughout 
the City organization, excluding the Board of Education,, 
These 12 involve a total of 107 separate units of equipment 
including a few units on order or requested in the 1961=62 
budget o 

2o The relatively small ratio of the central tabulating facility 
compared with the other city departments and the Board of 
Education installation is indicated in the following summary 
tabulation; 

Location of Boo of Monthly Monthly Monthly # of 
Equipment tfalts Rentals Salaries Total Total 

Central Tabu- 
lating 25 $ 3,000 $ 6,700 $ 9*700 12„3 

12 Other City 
Departments 101 J&S22 . 3hPQ0 .S^gOO Jlsl 

Subtotal-City 
Departments 132 $22,500 $fc3,7O0 $66,200 8308 

Board of 
Education _22 7,600 5*200 12»800 16.2 

GKAMD TOXALS X$k $30,100 $1*8,, £00 $79*000 100*0 



86 






3o On an antojal basis, the total costs amount tc 30,000, 
divided as follows: 

Central Tabulating &LL6 & GC0 

12 other city departments 678,000 

Subtotal, City Itepartments 754,000 

Board of Education 15% 000 

Total 19^8,000 

k» The above summary does net include the contemplated new 
installation of 7 tabulating equipment units in the Water 
Department main offices involving an additional annual rental 
of $10 9 700 to which must be added the salaries for operating 
personnel o 

5. It is apparent that if the costs for light, heat, power, 
rental and overhead were added to the above direct equipment 
and labor costs, the annual total expenditure for tabulating 
equipment would be considerably in excess of one million 
dollars e 

6. Because practically no equipment usage records are kept, it is 
difficult to estimate the equipment operating efficiency vith 
any degree of accuracy. At only two installations visited 
was time kept on the usage of the various equipment unite „ 

7„ Estimates obtained indicated that the equipment usage varies 
from about 3°$ to 30$ of full capacity s due principally to 
the widely varying demands and workloads in the separate 
depar t mental Installations. 

8. It is recognized and accepted good practice in both commercial 
end private tabulating installations to provide daily time 
distribution reports for each unit of equipment in order to 
appraise its usage and provide opportunity for more efficient 
scheduling of work and determining operating costs. 

°. Such time keeping and scheduling is all the more important in 
conjunction with centralized operations regardless of whether 
or not all of the equipment is consolidated at one location. 

10. Only a complete and detailed analysis of each installation 
would determines 

Ao What each installation is doing 

bo The justification and absolute necessity for each 
operation 

c. The actual time required to accomplish each sepasat?- 
prejeeto 

d. The specific utilization of each unit at each location . 

87 



. ( 



It would then be possible for en over-all siqpervisor or n 
ager to schedule work to best advantage, centralize as ouch 
of the equipment as possiblaj, eliminate units no longer 
needed, investigate and improve the clerical and related 
systems and procedures and provide competent centralized ad- 
ministration for these diversified tabulating activities „ 

Ho Such centralized approach to the consolidated usage and man- 
agement should materially reduce the equipment., manpower* and 
auxiliary costs for operating the City's total tabulating 
services o 

12 o The ultimately adopted centralized work program may require 
more than the current one-shift operation or certain units of 
equipment may require more than normal working time in order 
to permit better over-all scheduling. 

A 2-ahift operation would be more economical due to the rental 
basis for the second shift being only 50$ of the base shift 
rateo This rental saving would substantially exceed premium 
pay for second shift operation <, 

13o The potential use of electronic data processing equipment 

to effect economies in the clerical operations of many depart° 
ments is currently being explored by several departmental 
groups » The complex problems included in the determination 
of work best suited for performance on this type of equipment, 
the numerous makes and models of equipment available, the 
time element included in delivery and proper programming 
for effective use, etCo indicate the desirability of a central 
committee to properly coordinate the progress in this pro?r«"' 

Recommendations 



General 



The present tabulating and reproduction activities be sepa° 
rated from the .Jurisdiction of the Purchasing Department and 
reorganized and established as separate agencies i 

Bo Central Services Department o 

b<> Central Data Processing: XRvlslono 

Both these agencies be operated on a Revolving Fund arrange- 
ment for reimbursement for the services rendered to all 
departments o 



38 



. 



Central Services Department 

* lo The Central Services Department be administered by a Central 

Services Manager reporting to the Mayor o 

* 2o The following existing activities be established as sub° 

divisions of the new Central Services Department;; 

A Blueprinting 

Bo Photostating 

Co Photography 

Do Offset Duplicating and Mimeographing 

* 3<> The present activities be expanded to serve the needs of 

all City departments to tbe fullest extento 

* k» The foUovlng potentially additional services be reviewed;, 

analyzed and incorporated as units in the Central Services 
Department^, if determined to be desirable: 

a Clerical* Typing and Stenographic Pool 

bo Messenger Service 

Co Mailing Service 

do Office Equipment Maintenance 

e Telephone Service 

f o Information Service 

go Records Retention and Disposal 

«• 5* The space 9 equipment and personnel requirements for these 
activities be based on a comprehensive survey and analysis 
of the fullest possible economical use of these servicer 
facilities by all departments and the corresponding work 
and/or purchased costs be eliminated at the department 
levels o 

Proposed Organisation 

I. The central services activities of the Purchasing Departs 
and similar services in other departments be reorganised as 
a separate Central Services Department, substantially as 
indicated on Exhibit IV 

Ce ntral Data Processing Divis ion 

* lo This and other separate tabulating installations in various 

departments- excepting the Police Department and Board of 
Education^, be consolidated in a Central Data Processing 
Division in the finance Department;, to be administered by 
a Data Processing Manager reporting to the head of the 
Finance Departments 

* Charter change may be necessary 

89 






2o A complete and detailed analysis be made of the work perormed 
cod the utilization of equipment to determine the equipment 
and staffing requirements for the Central Data Processing 
Division to insure mxlratra economical operations on a 2-shift 
basis o 

* 3» A daily record and time card procedure be established for 

posting «-. complete record of the work performed by each em- 
ployee at veil as the machine time utilized, in order to 
establish the basis for determining the cost of each .job* 

* ko The Data Processing Manager be personally responsible for 

developing a complete, detailed scheduling of all jobs on 
the basis of an analysis of all vork required by departments, 
in order to maintain the highest possible machine usage 
factor and render the best possible service <> 

* 5<> In connection with the above analysis and scheduling, the 

Manager be responsible for maintaining a current job assign- 
ment schedule for both the day and night shifts, administered 
by the respective supervisors,, 

* 60 The Data Processing Manager be required to conduct continuing 

surveys and analyses of all Jobs performed on tabulating 
equipment., to determine their actual need and suitability for 
handling by tabulating methods o In cooperation with depart- 
ment heads, surveys be conducted to determine all clerical 
activities which can be performed more economically on data 
processing equipment* 

* 7« If and when electronic date, processing equipment is leased 

by the City, such equipment should be operated by the Central 
Data Processing Division.* 

80 In view of the complex problems involved in properly planning 
for use of electronic data processing equipment to effect 
eeon©Ka>f; in clerical operations, a central committee be 
appointed to properly coordinate and expedite this programo 

Proposed Organisation 

The mechanicfa tabulating activities now performed in the 
Purchasing Department and in a number of other departments, as previ- 
ously mentioned, be consolidated and reorganized as a Central Data 
Processing Divisicm of the Finance Department, as indicated on 
Exhibit Vo 



* Charter chJiage may be necessary 



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A REPORT TO THE 
BLYTH-ZELLERBACH COMMITTEE 



ON 

MODERN MANAGEMENT 

FOR SAN FRANCISCO 






Boards and Commissions 

A Plan of Organization 

for San Francisco 

JUNE 1961 VOLUME 5 



BOARDS AND COMMISSIONS 

A ELAN OF ORGANIZATION 

FOR 

SAN FRANCISCO 



Reports of the 
Task Forces 






REPORT 
WITH EECOm-IEKElATIONS 
CONG S ACTIVITIES 
OF 
BOARDS AND COMMISSIONS 

IN 
THE CITY AND COUNTT 
OF 
SAI 



WE 
JS AND C( 
OF 






BOARDS & 013S 



LLTOER OF SUBMITTAL 

May 1261 



Marshall Go Mustain, Project Director 
Mayor's Committee for Municipal Management 
San Francisco, California 

Dear Mr liustain: 

The attached recommendations concerning the activities of 
Boards and Commissions are based on visits to meetings of 
various boards and commissions,, analysis of their minutes, 
conversations with department heads and others affected 
by board and commission activities, and objective consid- 
eration of the basic reasons why boards and cosranissions 
should exist o 

You will note that our recommendations arc, for the most 
part, general rather than specific,, Development in detail 
would involve additional study at such time as charter 
change language is drafted. 



A Mo Chanbliss 
Chairman 



TABLE OF coin 



Operations of Bosrds and Coiaoissions 

SSEaBBSBga^gnBjtegpl^ng Charter Chgnggs 

Executive Functions 
Legislative Functions 
Quasi- judicial Functions 
Membership of Boards and Lons 









' 



There are 26 Boards and Commissions, and considerable dii" 
exist as to the scope of their activities and the mar.:: 
operate. However j they all 
tionss 

1 . Executive 

(a) Selection c -ent 

(b) Review of administrative actions 

(c) Direct participation in administration 

2„ Qjiasi^le ^isla tive 

(a) Establishment of policy or formulation of 

recommendations on policy 

(b) Control of revenues and expenditures 

3o Quasi°.1udicial 

(a) Hearing appeals from administrat 

decisions 

(b) Sitting as &. court in disciplinary a 

(c) Interpretation o; tion as appli 

to Rpscific CUS< 



RECOMMENDATIONS INVOLVING CHAHTEit CHAIJGL 



*• ^gCUTIVF, FUIICTIONS 

The exercise of executive fxmetions b 
effect of signific;-n oning the author:. 

and accountability or -.rfcrasnt heads and 

to uhom they X'aporto Mazy commie, 
departments under them a thus interpose 
tween the dej 
inento 

Recommen d at ion fflt All commissions shoulc 

their executive functions,, s 
department heads 
to the city's top rsa: 
lengthening the org 

ive managemej 



II. LEGISLATIVE FUNCTIONS 

The activities of commissions in considering questional of public 
policy have the advantages of; (a) fostering greater public interest 
in and understanding of these questions $ (b) bringing a variety of 
viewpoints to bear on such problems j ani (c) assuring greater con™ 
si deration' to many policy matters than uld he feasible if policy 
formulation were limited to the Mayor and the Board of Supervisors- 
However,, there is no ef > ,ond©ncy of individ- 

ual commissions to "promote" their own sp af interest,, 

Also* several commisaioriS have areas of overlapping jurisdiction, 
resulting in occasional conflicts., 

Jtec pmme ndation #1? Some consolidation of commissions should be 
effected in order to: 

(a) Provide for integrated development of 
h&sic policy in closely* related areas 
of operation,, 

(b) Reduce the number of areas of special 
interest „ 

(c) Establish bu orities for related 
activities e 

(d) Reduce the number of levels of appeal 
which now result in waste of time, 
effort and moneys 

Recommen dation #2; In the area of policy-makings the commissions' 
acti should be alined st developing broad 

policy recommendations which would bo passed 
on to the Mayor and the Board of Supervi?, 

Ilia QUASI- JUDICIAL, FEI.'CTIOKS 

Commissions provide a very useful channel of appeal from adfitij 
istratiir? ons 9 thus providing protection for both city employees 

and the without the necessity of carrying all appeals to the 

Board of Supervisors or to the courts » The scope of appeals handled 
by each scmwission should correspond to the activities covered by t 
commission in the policy area,, 

jte comraendatios $1 % I function of coEsrassi'. 

y changes in scope resu? 
from the consolidation recommended in the 
precedi:! : i XI 



regard to th 
is appropriate to point out that defic._ tave bean noted in 
of the rooms in which commission meetings are held, Ihere is over-' 
crowding, particularly at the meetings of the Art and Planning Com- 
missions held at 100 Larkin Street, and seating for the public is 
often inadequate and poorly arranged . No facilities are available 
for properly displa3 r ir plans, photographs, etc, so that both 
the commission members and the public can view them clearly* 



jfecomroandation 4'2 ; 



Meeting rooms should provide adequate 
seating,, with physical separation of 
seating areas between the commission 
and the public Reflex projectors 
and screens should be provided so that 
exhibits can be better viewed by be 
the board and the public „ 3he number 
of rooms so equipped should b 
to the frequency of comraLsi itings 
and scheduling requiremer/ 



IV „ MU-IBERSHIP OF BOARDS AND COTMESSICNS 



The effectiveness of any board obviously depends to a large de| 
on the manner in which its members are chosen . The following recomi 
tions are aimed at avoiding potential sources of weakness: 



Recommendation f'',l 



Provide for staggered terms of office 
in order to insure continuity of p- 
and maintain a nucleus of experienced 
members of each board, and ds«eiupibs 
the political complexion which can 
suit from a "clean broom" policy of a 
new 



Recommendation #2: 



Provide that corn:. 

ombre: t sliced field s 

legale artistic, etc.) have r 

all) of their members drawn frc 

fields, 



A ELAN OF ORGANIZATION 
FOR 
SAN FRANCISCO 



':HL 
MAYOR'S COMMI ! MUNICIPAL HI 



May 



Kay 1961 



Mr. Carl F. Wente, Chairman 

Mayor's Committee for Municipal Management 

San Francisco, California 

Bear Mr, Wente: 

We transmit herewith our plan for modernization of the governmental 
structure, developed in response to our finding, expressed in our 
Memorandum of Transmittal, that a complete overhaul was long past 
due* It was obvious early in our work that a resolution of the 
problems inherent in the basic plan of organisation was a condition 
precedent to an effective and lasting solution to the problems in 
other areas. 

This plan of organization was developed in accordance with sound 
menagenssnt principles and without regard for po3.itical considera- 
tions. We recognize that differences of opinion can, do, and 
will exist but we feel the esssct method used to accomplish the 
goal of modernisation is not nearly as important as creating 
general public understanding of the need for such modernisation 

In our opinion, this plan will serve that purpose, and therein 
lies its primary value » '.therefore, we submit this proposal as 
being one way »«• and admittedly there are other ways — cf 
achieving the goal of modernisation. The responsibility for the 
plan is ours, and should not be considered to reflect the poir 
or points, of view held by members of the Advisory Coitirnittees. 



Marshall G. Mustain, 
Project Director 






TABLE OF CONTENTS 

P ag e 

Findings 3 

Recoxoniendstions (Bsquire Charter Revision) 5 

Summary 9 

Present Organization BIT I 
Proposed Organisation 



PLAN OF ORGANIZATION 
FOR SAN FRANCISCO 



Findings 



Thirty years have elapsed sines the 1? t major reviei »n of the govern- 
ment's plan of organisation in San Francise • » The pr-esen-i charter 
adopted in 2931. Population increase, techao] gical advar as, changes in 
the nature of the population and changing publ .c attitudes toward local 
government have resulted in the need for ; ajor changes in he City-County 
managemont nAchinery. 

San Francisco ? s population has increased from 63^-000 in 1931 
?lt2,000 in 1961, an increase of 17$. The number of City-County employeac 
has increased from 12,000 in 1931 to 21,000 in 1961, an increase of 7S%* 
The annual budget has increased frcM 060,000,000 to £269.-000,000, an in- 
crease of 35>0$. The City-County government has become an enterprise of 
major proportions . 

The present 30 year old structure of City-County organisation 
(Exhibit I) seriously impedes the job of management. It tends to c: 
inefficiency and increased costs, instead of increased efficiency and 
decreased costs. 

The principal aspects of this problem are as follows: 

1, The office of X j Iayor is not only the chief executive office: 
the city as per the charter, but is also by tradition, practice, and 
public desire the political leader of the community. The attention re- 
quired 'bo properly handle these functions is enormous, and beyond the 
capacity and time of a single individual* thus the chief executive f 
tions of managing the city government suffer. The committee belicr 

the Mayor should be assisted in government* s managejasnt functions and 
that these functions should be assigned a 1 1 position direc 

responsible to the Mayor, 

2. The office of Mayor has been weakened by diffusion of power :. 
authority among twenty-six different boards and commissions. These boa: 
and commissions, many of whose members are appointed by the Mayor. 
powered by the charter to exercise broad authority and influence c 
their respective government activities „ Many of these boards and 
missions in practice exercise administrative control, of to: 

f rustrating to policy established by the Board of Super" 

In some cases boards and commissions have become more clear. 
with the clientele groups they are supposed to z'egulat 
public interest they are supposed to protect. 

The committee believes that the number of boards and commissions should 
be reduced and should be used primarily for advisory, counseling s 
quasi- judicial purposes* Ihay should not operate as administrat 
bodies. Effective administration requires definite placer ■ 
ibility and commensurate authority together with accountability for 
suits. The boards and commissions tend to shield and obscure identific 
tion of incompetent management. 



3. Dent. risen t heads and boards and commissions a: .e to cor. 
adequately with "the Mayor, There are two principal reasons for 
are too many line departments, staff agencies, boards and commissions, report- 
ing directly to him, and his duties other then those of city management re- 
quire an enormous amount of his time and attention. If the Mayor is to 
establish proper and efficient communications with the city's management heads, 
the present outdated cumbersome organisation structure must be overhauled. 

I4. Departments, boards end commissions do not have adequate communica- 
tion with each other. The proliferation of City-County agencies, each some- 
what insulated from the others, results in problems of interdepartme 
communications, and lack of overall coordination,, This also has caused much 
unnecessary duplication of work* 

The City-Country government does not function as a cohesive integrated whole s 
This not only creates costly interns! management problems but also creates 
confusion and ill will on the part of the employees and the public Sxpl.:.:- 
tions based on internal organization problems ?re little comfox- 
payer with his increasing tax bill. 

5a The existing management structure and operating procedures contain 
no incentives for management to bo offieieni, progress : 

Dedicated and serious effort is made by the Board of Supervisors an 
and others to hold down costs by ., and some oconc: 

accomplished. The present budget and procedures for its use however fall far 
short of providing a positive management tool for cost control. E: 
based on items of expenditure, is so voluminous, and unwieldy, tha 
possibly indicate where economies can intelligently be brought about, 
vides no means to test the essentiality of all work being performed, 
challenge the need for itea3 approved in previous budgets. (See section on 
bidget elsewhere in this report.) 

Its usefulness as 3 tool of management control is largely to centre 

able new items, which usually comprise less than 10 percent of 

Much annual cost increase is caused " 

indebtedness over which the present Board of Superviso: 

6 C There is a lack of overall plannir 
sonnel administration matters throughout the Ci 
in impaired employee morale and discourages manage 
inequities in treatment of both employees and annuitants. It c: 
of work and extra cost to the city. (See section on wages and 
where in this report.) 

The success of an enterprise depends upon the caliber, industry, and 1.. 
enthusiasm of its personnel. Its continuity depends upon its abil 
attract and generate these qualities on a continuing basis. 

A government enterprise has an added characteristic of being conduc: 
climate of politics. This imposes additional requirements of high i • 
and fairness upon its personnel administration. This makes it iner 
important that personnel administration matters be competently 
directed and ccordinatodc.